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Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Reprint edition (September 27, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 014303622X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0143036227
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (77 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #38,371 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Neurologist Damasio's refutation of the Cartesian idea of the human mind as separate from bodily processes draws on neurochemistry to support his claim that emotions play a central role in human decision making.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From Library Journal

The idea that the mind exists as a distinct entity from the body has profoundly influenced Western culture since Descartes proclaimed, "I think, therefore I am." Damasio, head of neurology at the University of Iowa and a prominent researcher on human brain function, challenges this premise in a fascinating and well-reasoned argument on the central role that emotion and feelings play in human rationality. According to Damasio, the same brain structures regulate both human biology and behavior and are indispensable to normal cognitive processes. Damasio demonstrates how patients (his own as well as the 19th-century railroad worker Nicholas Gage) with prefrontal cortical damage can no longer generate the emotions necessary for effective decision-making. A gifted scientist and writer, Damasio combines an Oliver Sack-like reportage with the presentation of complex, theoretical issues in neurobiology. Recommended for wide purchase.
Laurie Bartolini, Legislative Research, Springfield, Ill.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

It is not merely dull, it really obfuscates the issue unnecessarily.
whiteelephant
Dr. Damasio's Descartes' Error is a very readable and important contribution to our understanding of how our brain and body work on concert.
J. Scott Shipman
After reading this book, you will understand that this is very far from the truth.
Guy Denutte

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

144 of 151 people found the following review helpful By magellan HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on June 16, 2002
Format: Paperback
Damasio's book will be somewhat tough sledding for the non-specialist, but it's still a good book and worth sticking with to the end. Using Descartes's famous dictum as a departure point, and through a discussion of current theory and detailed case studies, he demonstrates the intimate relationship between the brain, mind, and body.
The case studies of sensory agnosia were very interesting, especially the one where the patient had apparently lost the functioning of the part of his brain that stored the awareness of one side of the patient's body, to the point where the patient had no awareness or perception of that half at all, and even denied that he even had a problem with it. There can be no clearer demonstration of the fact that our consciousness and awareness depends entirely on that 3-pound, convoluted mass of nerve cells we call the brain.

As someone with a pretty fair background in the area myself (I did a master's and almost completed a Ph.D. in psychobiology) I can vouch for Damasio's command of the scientific and technical issues and details (notwithstanding that fact that Damasio is both an M.D. and a Ph.D.) so he has a good command of the medical issues also. The book is very well written, although not easy, but Damasio does a fine job of explaining the more difficult ideas.
One further comment, I read one review that was critical of Damasio for supposedly misinterpreting Descartes's dictum, "I think, therefore I am," and then spent the whole review discussing Descartes instead of Damasio's book. The reviewer also stated that because of this Damasio lacks scientific objectivity. Since his comment is itself a good starting point for discussing the most important aspect of Damasio's book, I thought I'd write a little more on it here.
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47 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Brad4d VINE VOICE on December 24, 2003
Format: Paperback
Other reviewers have surely summarized and analyzed this modern classic far better than I could, so here are some hints that may help you productively enjoy it:

1.) scan sections of the book before and after you read them. The author's simple expositions are terrific but the book's organization and data blending can be confusing, and the pace often slows uncomfortably. 2.) If you are new to this subject (and any non-professional who hasn't had a CNS course recently is probably a beginner) I'd supplement this book with a good but lighter introduction to brain research (I'd strongly recommend the NYT Book of the Brain). 3.) Consider using a good neuroanatomy text or atlas, like Barr or Hanaway. The author's maps are surprisingly skimpy and I strongly hope he includes a few pages of neuroanatomical diagrams in any future editions. 4.) You may want to underline selected terms and definitions, and note the reference at the back of the book -- the book has no glossary and the index is annoyingly weak. 5.) I thought the most valuable sections were on the Somatic Marker Hypothesis, the Body-Minded Brain, and the Postscriptum -- consider scanning these sections as you begin the book.
Good luck and enjoy. The author's credentials are superb, his perspective complements other authors such as Edelmann and LeDoux, and he brings the unique and empathetic perspective of a neurologist who has specialized in analyzing the changes associated wtih discrete neuropathological conditions. The ideas you may receive from this wonderful book should be well worth the effort, and you should gain some insight into the miracle of how we think/feel/are.
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119 of 140 people found the following review helpful By Richard Parker on October 18, 1999
Format: Paperback
Damasio brings some some fascinating cases to bear on one of the oldest problems in philosophy and psychology. It's a good read and an important subject. It would be a mistake, however, to think that "Descartes' error" was just now being pointed out. In fact, practically no contemporary philosopher worth his or her salt subscribes to the Cartesian two-substance theory of body and mind. In his 1949 masterpiece, The Concept of Mind, Gilbert Ryle argued that Descartes' view was fatally flawed (and he wasn't really the first to point this out, either), and called it the "ghost in the machine" view of the body/mind relationship. If you get right down to it, Descartes himself would agree with Damasio that the emotions are not radically different kinds of things from the reasoning faculties, since he believed that experiencing an emotion was simply another mode of thought, just as drawing an inference is a mode of thought. But Descartes must be used to being a whipping boy by now, 350 years after his death; and the historical perspective aside, Damasio's book is an excellent contribution to scholarship on the effects of emotion on rationality.
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40 of 46 people found the following review helpful By whiteelephant on May 16, 2011
Format: Paperback
This question has been pondered by many, from Descartes to William James to Morrissey, and more recently, Antonio Damasio. As a neuroscientist, I share Damasio's conviction that emotion is absolutely central to understanding the mind. Unfortunately, that is the extent of my sympathy for this book. Damasio takes this starting point, notes the correspondence between emotions and body states, and from it constructs his ill-conceived 'somatic marker hypothesis', casting his lot with the body-ruled mind.

This book fails on a number of levels. To begin with, it is almost unreadable. Such tangled and confused writing would never make it past the editing of any decent journal. It is not merely dull, it really obfuscates the issue unnecessarily. Thus, to the reader interested in Damasio's theory I suggest his published paper "The Somatic Marker Hypothesis and the Possible Functions of the Prefrontal Cortex", 1996, which can be found freely online.

My main objection to the theory is the excessive role that it gives the body in influencing brain states. Undoubtably, the brain is capable of sensing and being influenced by changes in the body state. However, Damasio gives this pathway a primary role in emotion. Presumably Damasio imagines a stimulus activating some part of the brain (e.g. amygdala), which then triggers an emotional body state, which in turn is observed by the brain, creating an emotional 'feeling'. While such feedback loops are possible, they would be incredibly inefficient - why wouldn't the amygdala just communicate the emotional state directly to other brain regions instead of relying on the 'somatic markers' of a body feedback loop? Damasio's view is not parsimonious, nor is it supported by much evidence.
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