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Descriptive Inorganic, Coordination, and Solid State Chemistry 3rd Edition

3.5 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0840068460
ISBN-10: 0840068468
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Dr. Glen E. Rodgers is a Professor Emeritus of Chemistry at Allegheny College in Meadville, PA. Educated at Tufts University (BS, 1966) and Cornell University (PhD, 1971), he taught for five years at Muskingum College in Ohio before moving to Allegheny where he taught from 1975 to 2005. He taught introductory chemistry on several levels, chemistry for nurses, chemistry for non-science majors, a "First Seminar" entitled "The Making of the Atomic Bomb: More Bang for Your Buck", a "Sophomore Seminar" entitled "Communicating Chemistry," inorganic chemistry (on both the sophomore and advanced undergraduate levels), and numerous interdisciplinary courses with colleagues in history, education, English, philosophy, psychology, and economics. He has received a variety of teaching honors including the 1993 Julian Ross Award, presented by Allegheny College "for singular accomplishments and contributions through excellence in teaching." He and his wife have led or co-led several Allegheny travel seminars to places such as England, Scotland, Paris, Switzerland, Germany, Norway, Sweden, the Czech Republic, Poland and Russia. Now a full time writer, his current and future projects include a book with the working title "Traveling with the Atom." He lives with his wife Kathleen in southern New Hampshire. They are the parents of three daughters, Jennifer, Emily, and Rebecca.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 656 pages
  • Publisher: Brooks Cole; 3 edition (January 19, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0840068468
  • ISBN-13: 978-0840068460
  • Product Dimensions: 10.1 x 8.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #412,624 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I used this book for a one semester course in which we covered every chapter. The book is divided into 3 sections which can be read in any order, our class started with the descriptive inorganic section; this section of the book covers all the elements, not counting the transition or La/Ac series elements and offers a story behind each element (where, when, how it was discovered, the scientist who discovered it, etc) as well as what the specific element is used for. This section also covers basic trends in the periodic table which gives you a greater appreciation for the periodic table as well as a better understanding of reactions involving certain elements. For me, these 8 chapters were very entertaining as well as informative; it was a genuine page turner (hard to believe, but it really was). The other sections deal with coordination chemistry and solid state chemistry; each of these topics was covered in an easy to understand manner, although not necessarily as interesting as the inorganic section mentioned above. The problems in the back of the book are great and help you understand the material in covered in the chapters.
Overall, one of my favorite books I've ever read, highly recommended even if its not a required text in your course!
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Format: Hardcover
Currently taking (fall 07) inorganic chemistry and we are using this book. It is divided into three sections ( you can see that from the title) which can be read independently. Very good book so far, easy reading, problems are easy. All you need to read this book is general chemistry, it is the only prereq that the author recomends that you have before you take a class that uses this book.
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Format: Hardcover
We've used Rodgers for a few years now. My largest problem with the text is that it reads like a novel.

Pros:
1. Excellent review questions at the end of each chapter. Better than Messler and Tarr.
2. The author seems quite passionate about the subject matter, which might be infectious to students. From my understanding Rodgers took a year-long sabbatical to write this textbook.
3. The author does a great job breaking down the mathematics behind inorganic chemistry.
4. Rodgers presents fairly clear diagrams (in black and white) which help support what he is trying to communicate in the text.
5. Decent teaching materials are available through the publisher. These include an art library and solutions manual (there is no test bank included).
6. The writing is a bit more lively than traditionally-used inorganic textbooks (e.g., MacKay et al; Douglas et al.)

Cons:
1. It reads like a novel; makes locating information (quickly) a headache.
2. The price is too unreasonable. I feel horrible asking my students to purchase a textbook for $200.
3. Content begins with coordination chemistry, which is contrary to an "atoms first" approach adopted by many general chemistry textbooks. I my mind, inorganic should start with quantum mechanics, move onto atoms, molecules, and then blossom into coordination compounds.
4. Instrumental methods presented in the textbook are quite vague. Many content on most standardized subject tests include instrumental knowledge (e.g., FT-IR, NMR).
5. The lack of color makes the content unappetizing to my students. In future editions, I'd like to see Rodgers published in color.
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Format: Hardcover
Glen Rodgers, the author, is clearly very passionate about chemistry and that shows through in this book. He makes an admirable effort to provide a strong historical foundation for inorganic chemistry and with a relaxed, approachable writing style he does a great job at this. He does a less stellar job, however, at actually talking about chemistry. This is a short textbook and it shows; tricky concepts as fundamental as effective nuclear charge and primary and secondary oxidation states are explained in very roundabout, indirect ways; he fails to build a foundation and go off of it. Instead the book ambles along and one has to hope to pick up the concepts as they come. When he focuses his writing the concepts become clearer; if he showed this focus throughout the length of the book it would be five stars; as it is I think three stars is a fair rating. It is a decent book but not great (and very overpriced at nearly $200).
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I bought this book because I lost my other one--a finder-keeper situation.

The book is a gentle introduction into the realms of inorganic chemistry. If physical chemistry, organic chemistry, analytical (also known as quantum) chemistry, and biochemistry are sister disciplines that can be said to deal with a limited portions of the periodic table (organic chemistry and biochemistry) or the abstract concepts not directly related to the periodic table (physical chemistry and quantum chemistry), inorganic chemistry attempts to deals with everything else. As the reader might expect, that is a huge goal. This book is but the first step toward accomplishing that goal. My professor started at Chapter 9 after Chapter 1, which I think is an easier place to start, because you gain an overview of Groups I to VIII elements, what a reader coming with a general and organic chemistry background is likely already more familiar with, before starting in the transitions metal elements chapters, where one must learn unfamiliar nomenclature for ligand coordination chemistry, and ending with chapters on solid-state chemistry (dealing with crystal arrangement and doping).

The problems aren't heavy on the technical aspects. You will not be pulled into difficult calculations characteristic of physical and analytical chemistry. Instead, the title describes the book aptly, it is a book focused on describing inorganic chemistry, not on going into details of orbital chemistry, calculations, and experiments. It is a good review book, a reference book, and an introductory course to the less popular, yet still fascinating aspects of the periodic table of which most people have only a passing understanding.
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