Need to Return Your Textbook Rental?
Design Driven Testing: Test Smarter, Not Harder and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering
Sell Us Your Item
For a $7.71 Gift Card
Trade in
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading Design Driven Testing: Test Smarter, Not Harder on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Design Driven Testing: Test Smarter, Not Harder [Paperback]

Matt Stephens , Doug Rosenberg
3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)

List Price: $59.99
Price: $38.78 & FREE Shipping. Details
You Save: $21.21 (35%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Monday, July 14? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition $27.49  
Paperback $38.78  
Books for Pragmatic Programmers
Find resources for various programming needs, including agile teams, programming languages, and the life of a programmer, in the Pragmatic Bookshelf.

Book Description

September 15, 2010 1430229438 978-1430229438 1

The groundbreaking book Design Driven Testing brings sanity back to the software development process by flipping around the concept of Test Driven Development (TDD)—restoring the concept of using testing to verify a design instead of pretending that unit tests are a replacement for design. Anyone who feels that TDD is “Too Damn Difficult” will appreciate this book.

Design Driven Testing shows that, by combining a forward-thinking development process with cutting-edge automation, testing can be a finely targeted, business-driven, rewarding effort. In other words, you’ll learn how to test smarter, not harder.

  • Applies a feedback-driven approach to each stage of the project lifecycle.
  • Illustrates a lightweight and effective approach using a core subset of UML.
  • Follows a real-life example project using Java and Flex/ActionScript.
  • Presents bonus chapters for advanced DDTers covering unit-test antipatterns (and their opposite, “test-conscious” design patterns), and showing how to create your own test transformation templates in Enterprise Architect.

What you’ll learn

  • Create unit and behavioral tests using JUnit, NUnit, FlexUnit.
  • Generate acceptance tests for all usage paths through use case thread expansion.
  • Generate requirement tests for functional requirements.
  • Run complex acceptance tests across the enterprise.
  • Isolate individual control points for self-contained unit/behavioral tests.
  • Apply behavior-driven development frameworks like JBehave and NBehave

Who this book is for

Design Driven Testing should appeal to developers, project managers, testers, business analysts, architects—in fact, anyone who builds software that needs to be tested. While equally applicable on both large and small projects, Design Driven Testing is especially helpful to those developers who need to verify their software against formal requirements. Such developers will benefit greatly from the rational and disciplined approach espoused by the authors.

Table of Contents

  1. Somebody Has It Backwards
  2. TDD Using Hello World
  3. “Hello World!” Using DDT
  4. Introducing the Mapplet Project
  5. Detailed Design and Unit Testing
  6. Conceptual Design and Controller Testing
  7. Acceptance Testing: Expanding Use Case Scenarios
  8. Acceptance Testing: Business Requirements
  9. Unit Testing Antipatterns (The “Don’ts”)
  10. Design for Easier Testing
  11. Automated Integration Testing
  12. Unit Testing Algorithms
  13. Alice in Use-Case Land
  14. ’Twas Brillig and the Slithy Tests

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Matt Stephens is a Java developer, project leader, and technical architect with a financial organization based in central London. He's been developing software commercially for over 15 years, and has led many agile projects through successive customer releases. He has spoken at a number of software conferences on�object-oriented development topics, and his writing appears regularly in a variety of software journals and websites, including The Register and ObjectiveView.

Matt is the co-author of Extreme Programming Refactored: The Case Against XP (Apress, 2003) with Doug Rosenberg, Agile Development with ICONIX Process (Apress, 2005) with Doug Rosenberg and Mark Collins-Cope, and Use Case Driven Object Modeling with UML: Theory and Practice with Doug Rosenberg (Apress, 2007).

Catch Matt online at www.softwarereality.com.



Doug Rosenberg is�founder and president of ICONIX Software Engineering, Inc. (www.iconixsw.com). Doug spent the first 15 years of his career writing code for a living before moving on to managing programmers, developing software design tools, and teaching object-oriented analysis and design.

Doug has been providing system development tools and training for nearly two decades, with particular emphasis on object-oriented methods. He developed a unified Booch/Rumbaugh/Jacobson design method in 1993 that preceded Rational's UML by several years. He has produced more than a dozen multimedia tutorials on object technology, including COMPREHENSIVE COM and Enterprise Architect for Power Users, and is the coauthor of Use Case Driven Object Modeling with UML (Addison-Wesley, 1999) and Applying Use Case Driven Object Modeling with UML (Addison-Wesley, 2001), both with Kendall Scott, as well as Extreme Programming Refactored: The Case Against XP (Apress, 2003) with Matt Stephens, Agile Development with ICONIX Process (Apress, 2005) with Matt Stephens and Mark Collins-Cope, and Use Case Driven Object Modeling with UML: Theory and Practice with Matt Stephens (Apress, 2007).

A few years ago, Doug started a second business, an online travel website (www.VResorts.com) that features his virtual reality photography and some innovative mapping software.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Apress; 1 edition (September 15, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1430229438
  • ISBN-13: 978-1430229438
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 7.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,547,848 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Matt Stephens is a software consultant with a financial organization based in Central London. He's been developing software commercially for 20 years, and has led many agile projects through successive customer releases. He has spoken at a number of software conferences on OO development topics, and his writing appears regularly in a variety of journals and websites, including The Register and ObjectiveView.

Matt is also the founder of independent book publisher Fingerpress: www.fingerpress.co.uk

Catch Matt online at: http://articles.softwarereality.com


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Eye opener September 22, 2010
Format:Paperback
'Design Driven Testing: Test Smarter, Not Harder' is the second book that I've read by authors Doug Rosenberg and Matt Stephens, the other being 'Use Case Driven
Object Modelling with UML Theory and Practice'. Once again I've been impressed, not only by the content but also, by the manner in which concepts are presented. I have a technical background and spend a considerable amount of time reading journals, blogs, articles and books and I especially enjoy it when the author screams out with passion for his/her subject, as in this case.

Before reading this book I'd not heard too much about DDT and even now it doesn't seem to be generating a huge amount of noise. I think this is maybe because a lot of people and organisations have spent vast amounts of time, money and hard effort investing in TDD.

I've been fortunate to have used TDD on many projects and it never surprises me the number of times when 'TDD' projects are not actually 'TDD'. From a high-level it seems really simple but then again simple things are not always what they seem.
By reading the accounts of Rosenberg and Stephens it's amazing how much one can learn not just about DDT but also TDD. It was also fascinating to learn that a lot of things I've done in the past have been very compatible with the DDT approach, such as robustness analysis and testing `hot-spots'.
I'm not sure if I'll be making the move to a pure DDT approach, but nonetheless it's shown flaws in past TDD projects that I've been part of (e.g. chasing code coverage, lack of design and not thinking deeply about acceptance testing).
The book is a good read and I appreciated the examples and simple concepts such as top 10's. I highly recommend the book even if you're not likely to use DDT because, like me, it's made me think long and hard about TDD and how to get the most out of it.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A happier existence February 7, 2011
By Duncan
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I have been driven crazy in the past by over-engineered projects that end up costing more than they should simply because the methodology calls for it. The 'Test smarter, not harder' approach in this book is a breath of fresh air.

We build systems to a business-driven design, so it makes perfect sense to test software from the point of view of that design, not the point of view of the language.

The examples given in this book show a blow-by-blow account of the internal flaws in test-driven design. I am a fan of testing, but an elegant test with appropriate coverage will always be better than a thousand arbitrary tests which prove the internal consistency of a method or class.

Buy this book and change your thinking.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great resource, clear and concise January 11, 2011
Format:Paperback
I'm very glad I came across this book. I'm new to the space of Test Driven Development(TDD) and was having a hard time wrapping my head around the concepts. It seemed to me that the goal of TDD was to unit test every function written by the application and seemed to be getting away from the purpose of the application itself. To me, it appeared as if there was little emphasis on the customers goals for the application and acceptance criteria. Just making sure all your code works does not necessarily mean the application has achieved the criteria set out by the client. The tests driving the design also didn't make much sense to me, because it doesn't really address the needs of the users for whom the application is intended and suggests a design geared to functionality and not usability.

Design Driven Testing(DDT) is a very neat philosophy that gives equal consideration to the technical folks developing the software and the client for whom it is intended.

Design Driven Testing by Matt Stephens and Doug Rosenberg begins appropriately by comparing and contrasting these two philosophies using a "real world" example. It clearly details where the philosophies diverge and is a great setup for the rest of book, which continues to indicate exactly why and how DDT is so much better. The style of writing is clear, concise and very easy to read. The authors illustrate their point of view by using real world coding examples. The simplicity of the examples themselves is a great advertisement for DDT.

As a consultant, acceptance testing is very important to me and the focus in the latter part of the book on Controller Testing is great. To me, this is where TDD fails and I was very glad to see an emphasis here on the higher level purpose of the application and not just making sure the code doesn't generate an exception.

Overall, this is a great read and a good starting place for anyone getting into Design Driven Testing or even Test Driven Design.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Be smart about your testing October 3, 2010
By Al
Format:Paperback
Summary:
In software development there is no shortage of methodologies. A seasoned software development team will be careful not to plunge headlong into a particular methodology without properly understanding its strengths and weaknesses. As the proverb says "A person seems right until someone comes forward and questions him." This book provides insight into challenges you may face with a bottom up approach (TDD in particular) and offers a top down approach (the reverse of TDD, or DDT).

Audience:
This book will prove useful to several audiences - managers, architects, analysts, developers and testers. Software development isn't about one role (for example testing) dominating the life cycle - instead it is an ongoing collaborative approach. This is where design and modeling can help to transfer the right requirements to classes and into code. The design drives test cases naturally.

Likes and Dislikes:
The conversational style of writing pulls the reader into the discussion around challenges with proper testing of a real application. If you already understand the benefits of software modeling, you will quickly appreciate how your knowledge can help with smarter software testing. The authors are not advocating an either/or approach between TDD and DDT. Both can coexist but TDD has some blind spots to be aware of. Those who use Enterprise Architect as their modeling tool will be pleased to find several useful screenshots and examples included.

Those who have read and benefited from previous books by the authors will find some of the earlier information repetitive. Thankfully the authors point readers to their other references and quickly move on.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars He doesn't even Understand TDD to Begin with
This is the lamest book I've ever started to read. I was looking for more TDD books and somehow landed with this piece of crap in the list of Safari Online results. Read more
Published 3 months ago by na
1.0 out of 5 stars Promotinal material for the author's own product
The term ICONIX is used several times in the book as an alternative to DDT (Design Driven Testing), however DDT is a technology, but ICONIX is the the author's companies product. Read more
Published 22 months ago by The Little mouse
1.0 out of 5 stars A Smear Job and Sales Pitch in One...Don't Bother
As some other reviewers have pointed out, this book is a misrepresentation of TDD. I'll add to that and say its a sales pitch. Read more
Published 22 months ago by Richard Dammkoehler
2.0 out of 5 stars No Need For This Screed
According to the Apress Roadmap on the back cover of this book, this book should be read after the books Use Case Driven Object Modeling with UML, and Agile Development with ICONIX... Read more
Published on June 30, 2012 by R S Shaffer
2.0 out of 5 stars Terrible
Chapters 1 and 2 have many misconceptions about TDD. The authors have not seen proper TDD and from that they deduct that TDD is bad. Read more
Published on February 26, 2012 by R. Wenner
5.0 out of 5 stars Dozen Copies
This is the second class I have asked Doug to teach for me. We are using the book in a development and maintenance environment. Read more
Published on December 17, 2011 by Douglas Infiesto
4.0 out of 5 stars Highly Recommended
For those who couldn't believe that it was possible to have upfront analysis and design in an agile, test driven mindset (acceptance testing included), this book shows exactly how... Read more
Published on September 26, 2010 by Estanqueiro
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 



Look for Similar Items by Category