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Design Driven Testing: Test Smarter, Not Harder 2010th Edition

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ISBN-13: 978-1430229438
ISBN-10: 1430229438
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Matt Stephens is a Java developer, project leader, and technical architect with a financial organization based in central London. He's been developing software commercially for over 15 years, and has led many agile projects through successive customer releases. He has spoken at a number of software conferences on object-oriented development topics, and his writing appears regularly in a variety of software journals and websites, including The Register and ObjectiveView.

Matt is the co-author of Extreme Programming Refactored: The Case Against XP (Apress, 2003) with Doug Rosenberg, Agile Development with ICONIX Process (Apress, 2005) with Doug Rosenberg and Mark Collins-Cope, and Use Case Driven Object Modeling with UML: Theory and Practice with Doug Rosenberg (Apress, 2007).

Catch Matt online at www.softwarereality.com.



Doug Rosenberg is founder and president of ICONIX Software Engineering, Inc. (www.iconixsw.com). Doug spent the first 15 years of his career writing code for a living before moving on to managing programmers, developing software design tools, and teaching object-oriented analysis and design.

Doug has been providing system development tools and training for nearly two decades, with particular emphasis on object-oriented methods. He developed a unified Booch/Rumbaugh/Jacobson design method in 1993 that preceded Rational's UML by several years. He has produced more than a dozen multimedia tutorials on object technology, including COMPREHENSIVE COM and Enterprise Architect for Power Users, and is the coauthor of Use Case Driven Object Modeling with UML (Addison-Wesley, 1999) and Applying Use Case Driven Object Modeling with UML (Addison-Wesley, 2001), both with Kendall Scott, as well as Extreme Programming Refactored: The Case Against XP (Apress, 2003) with Matt Stephens, Agile Development with ICONIX Process (Apress, 2005) with Matt Stephens and Mark Collins-Cope, and Use Case Driven Object Modeling with UML: Theory and Practice with Matt Stephens (Apress, 2007).

A few years ago, Doug started a second business, an online travel website (www.VResorts.com) that features his virtual reality photography and some innovative mapping software.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Apress; 2010 edition (September 17, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1430229438
  • ISBN-13: 978-1430229438
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 0.8 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,933,912 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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More About the Author

Matt Stephens is a software consultant with a financial organization based in Central London. He's been developing software commercially for 20 years, and has led many agile projects through successive customer releases. He has spoken at a number of software conferences on OO development topics, and his writing appears regularly in a variety of journals and websites, including The Register and ObjectiveView.

Matt is also the founder of independent book publisher Fingerpress: www.fingerpress.co.uk

Catch Matt online at: http://articles.softwarereality.com

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By I. Chishty on September 22, 2010
Format: Paperback
'Design Driven Testing: Test Smarter, Not Harder' is the second book that I've read by authors Doug Rosenberg and Matt Stephens, the other being 'Use Case Driven
Object Modelling with UML Theory and Practice'. Once again I've been impressed, not only by the content but also, by the manner in which concepts are presented. I have a technical background and spend a considerable amount of time reading journals, blogs, articles and books and I especially enjoy it when the author screams out with passion for his/her subject, as in this case.

Before reading this book I'd not heard too much about DDT and even now it doesn't seem to be generating a huge amount of noise. I think this is maybe because a lot of people and organisations have spent vast amounts of time, money and hard effort investing in TDD.

I've been fortunate to have used TDD on many projects and it never surprises me the number of times when 'TDD' projects are not actually 'TDD'. From a high-level it seems really simple but then again simple things are not always what they seem.
By reading the accounts of Rosenberg and Stephens it's amazing how much one can learn not just about DDT but also TDD. It was also fascinating to learn that a lot of things I've done in the past have been very compatible with the DDT approach, such as robustness analysis and testing `hot-spots'.
I'm not sure if I'll be making the move to a pure DDT approach, but nonetheless it's shown flaws in past TDD projects that I've been part of (e.g. chasing code coverage, lack of design and not thinking deeply about acceptance testing).
The book is a good read and I appreciated the examples and simple concepts such as top 10's. I highly recommend the book even if you're not likely to use DDT because, like me, it's made me think long and hard about TDD and how to get the most out of it.
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20 of 26 people found the following review helpful By R. Wenner on February 26, 2012
Format: Paperback
Chapters 1 and 2 have many misconceptions about TDD. The authors have not seen proper TDD and from that they deduct that TDD is bad. Here are just a handful of the gems:

- "TDD produces a lot of [unneeded] tests." -- How so?

- "the sheer hard work of refactoring your way to a finished product, rewriting both code and tests as you go." Yes, that's right, the authors apparently don't even understand the difference between refactoring and rewriting.

- Their TDD code has an AccountingValidatorFactory without a single test for it, much less the need for it.

On the one hand the authors acknowledge that TDD is only part of some agile practices like XP, on the other hand they complain that TDD does not do design documentation (that would be a specific task in XP), does not include acceptance testing, and does not cook breakfast. They are comparing apples to oranges and are proud of it.

The above makes the book irritating to read. If your DDT is so great, just explain it and let me draw my own conclusions. I do not need your trash talking. It would also help to show TDD of the same quality as the TDD code. Instead the tests in chapter 2 are poorly named, do too much too fast, have unneeded code, and generally look like beginner's work. Of course, this does
not happen to the counter examples for DDT that follow.

Some DDT ideas sound promising, but the authors don't live up to their claims:

- Generating acceptance and unit tests from designs: DDT / the book cannot fulfill these promises, it only generates (crappy) code skeletons. Eighties CASE tools, anybody?

- Test smarter, not harder: the number of tests explodes with DDT!
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By R S Shaffer on June 30, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
According to the Apress Roadmap on the back cover of this book, this book should be read after the books Use Case Driven Object Modeling with UML, and Agile Development with ICONIX Process. To take advantage of this book you'll probably need to do that. The book assumes the ICONIX Process and a CASE tool (EA Architect).

I was hoping to find a book containing useful testing techniques, design driven or otherwise. What I got instead was an uninformed screed against TDD, XP, and other Agile practices. The needless potshots at TDD were exacerbated by the fact that the authors appeared to know little or nothing about what they were attacking. Some of their misrepresentations are downright laughable.

Portions of the book were flat-out missing. The text would refer to some other section that wasn't even there. The authors repeatedly push their other books when they should have been more concerned about making this one worth purchasing.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Al on October 3, 2010
Format: Paperback
Summary:
In software development there is no shortage of methodologies. A seasoned software development team will be careful not to plunge headlong into a particular methodology without properly understanding its strengths and weaknesses. As the proverb says "A person seems right until someone comes forward and questions him." This book provides insight into challenges you may face with a bottom up approach (TDD in particular) and offers a top down approach (the reverse of TDD, or DDT).

Audience:
This book will prove useful to several audiences - managers, architects, analysts, developers and testers. Software development isn't about one role (for example testing) dominating the life cycle - instead it is an ongoing collaborative approach. This is where design and modeling can help to transfer the right requirements to classes and into code. The design drives test cases naturally.

Likes and Dislikes:
The conversational style of writing pulls the reader into the discussion around challenges with proper testing of a real application. If you already understand the benefits of software modeling, you will quickly appreciate how your knowledge can help with smarter software testing. The authors are not advocating an either/or approach between TDD and DDT. Both can coexist but TDD has some blind spots to be aware of. Those who use Enterprise Architect as their modeling tool will be pleased to find several useful screenshots and examples included.

Those who have read and benefited from previous books by the authors will find some of the earlier information repetitive. Thankfully the authors point readers to their other references and quickly move on.
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