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The Design and Implementation of the FreeBSD Operating System (2nd Edition) Hardcover – September 15, 2014

ISBN-13: 978-0321968975 ISBN-10: 0321968972 Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 928 pages
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional; 2 edition (September 15, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0321968972
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321968975
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.6 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #18,638 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Marshall Kirk McKusick writes books and articles, consults, and teaches classes on UNIX- and BSD-related subjects. While at the University of California at Berkeley, he implemented the 4.2BSD fast filesystem and was the Research Computer Scientist at the Berkeley Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG), overseeing the development and release of 4.3BSD and 4.4BSD. His particular areas of interest are the virtual-memory system and the filesystem. He earned his undergraduate degree in electrical engineering from Cornell University and did his graduate work at the University of California at Berkeley, where he received master’s degrees in computer science and business administration, and a doctoral degree in computer science. He has twice been president of the board of the Usenix Association, is currently a member of the FreeBSD Foundation Board of Directors, a member of the editorial board of ACM’s Queue magazine, a senior member of the IEEE, and a member of the Usenix Association, ACM, and AAAS. In his spare time, he enjoys swimming, scuba diving, and wine collecting. The wine is stored in a specially constructed wine cellar (accessible from the Web at http://www.McKusick.com/cgi-bin/readhouse) in the basement of the house that he shares with Eric Allman, his partner of 35-and-some-odd years and husband since 2013.

 

George V. Neville-Neil hacks, writes, teaches, and consults in the areas of Security, Networking, and Operating Systems. Other areas of interest include embedded and real-time systems, network time protocols, and code spelunking. In 2007, he helped start the AsiaBSDCon series of conferences in Tokyo, Japan, and has served on the program committee every year since then. He is a member of the FreeBSD Foundation Board of Directors, and was a member of the FreeBSD Core Team for 4 years. Contributing broadly to open source, he is the lead developer on the Precision Time Protocol project (http://ptpd.sf.net) and the developer of the Packet Construction Set (http://pcs.sf.net). Since 2004, he has written a monthly column, ‘‘Kode Vicious,’’ that appears both in ACM’s Queue and Communications of the ACM. He serves on the editorial board of ACM’s Queue magazine, is vice-chair of ACM’s Practitioner Board, and is a member of the Usenix Association, ACM, IEEE, and AAAS. He earned his bachelor’s degree in computer science at Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts. He is an avid bicyclist, hiker, and traveler who has lived in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and Tokyo, Japan. He is currently based in Brooklyn, New York, where he lives with his husband, Kaz Senju.

 

Robert N.M. Watson is a University Lecturer in Systems, Security, and Architecture in the Security Research Group at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory. He supervises doctoral students and postdoctoral researchers in cross-layer research projects spanning computer architecture, compilers, program analysis, program transformation, operating systems, networking, and security. Dr. Watson is a member of the FreeBSD Foundation Board of Directors, was a member of the FreeBSD Core Team for 10 years, and has been a FreeBSD committer for 15 years. His open-source contributions include work on FreeBSD networking, security, and multiprocessing. Having grown up in Washington, D. C., he earned his undergraduate degree in Logic and Computation, with a double major in Computer Science, at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and then worked at a series of industrial research labs investigating computer security. He earned his doctoral degree at the University of Cambridge, where his graduate research was in extensible operating system access control. Dr. Watson and his wife Dr. Leigh Denault have lived in Cambridge, England, for 10 years.


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By brad on September 17, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Loved the first edition and so far this is not disappointing. The topic coverage includes a lot of fundamental details that might be useful for understanding any free unix-like kernel, but most of the good stuff focuses on details that are FreeBSD-specific. I'm glad that this isn't just republishing material that is freely available in the FreeBSD handbook, which is also a fantastic resource but you'll need this book to understand the motivations for various design choices.

Its worth noting that this book is not a generic OS design book. The focus of the book relates to FreeBSD-specific details. This book is also not really an exploration of POSIX or any other attempt to standardize system interfaces. This book is definitely not a programming guide....for that, I recommend "Advanced Programming in the Unix Environment" (aka APUE) which has coverage of BSD apis (as well as linux)...which is an excellent companion for this work.

I would like to see a perpetual electronic version of this book...on the back cover there was only a reference to free 45 day access. That is disappointing in 2014.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By D. Leimbach on September 16, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I love the organization of this book! It feels like something you could really read cover to cover if you wanted to, but you can definitely skip around too.

If you're thinking about doing FreeBSD development, this is a must-have resource! So glad it's been updated!

If there's a kindle version made available I'll buy that too.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robert M. Koretsky on September 20, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is beautifully done! Bravo!
The way I see it, the kernel has two faces- one close to the hardware, and the other close to the person writing an application using system calls. And a big chunk in between. Here's the ? If FreeBSD and it's beautiful sister PC-BSD boot up into zfs, zfs is in the kernel, it's the mounted filesystem, why only 30-something pages in this edition on zfs ? This is a kernel book. If someone is writing system calls to work on or with the file system, they're working on the face of the kernel close to them, isn't that the face zfs presents itself via system calls to a programmer? Or is zfs on the face closest to the hardware? Not clear on this myself.

I am still trying to understand what is being said in Chapter 7, but do see that excellent kernel diagram at the start of Chapter 7! I was hoping there would be more of a description of how zfs actually stitched into the kernel, on both faces and in the big chunk in the middle. It's probably closer to the hardware than I imagine. As I posted on the PC-BSD forums, the on-disk specification of zfs is complex. I don't see how the system calls you make have anything to do with zfs, unless I guess you are writing extensions to it.
I would appreciate someone clarifying this issue for me, someone that does that kind of programming.

***It doesn't seem as if the entire chapter, Chapter 9 on the Fast File System, is applicable any more to the two current BSD's. Perhaps historically. Too bad they didn't add those pages to zfs explication.***

Just as a postscript, the only two UNIX systems that ship with zfs in the kernel that I know of are FreeBSD/PCBSD and Oracle Solaris/ OpenIndie. I know you can build it from openzfs source, into a Steve, Linus, or probably even Bill machine.
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By Rich Turner on October 14, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It took 10 years, but its finally here: Great update to the definitive text describing the internal workings of FreeBSD. Highly recommended.
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