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Designing Multi-Device Experiences: An Ecosystem Approach to User Experiences across Devices Paperback – February 28, 2014

ISBN-13: 978-1449340384 ISBN-10: 1449340385 Edition: 1st

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Designing Multi-Device Experiences: An Ecosystem Approach to User Experiences across Devices + Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (3rd Edition) (Voices That Matter) + 100 Things Every Designer Needs to Know About People (Voices That Matter)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 322 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (February 28, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1449340385
  • ISBN-13: 978-1449340384
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (62 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #60,148 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Book Description

An Ecosystem Approach to User Experiences across Devices

About the Author

Michal Levin, Senior User Experience Designer at Google, has extensive practice in UX design for web, mobile, and TV. Since joining Google in 2009, Michal has been responsible for the UX design of a variety of product areas including data analytics, data visualization, search, and business applications. She has presented at leading international UX conferences on the concept of ecosystem design, as well as designing for different screen sizes. Prior to Google, Michal worked as Senior UX expert at TZUR, a leading UX design consultancy in Israel, and as UX specialist at Modu, a start-up company that developed an innovative type of mobile eco-system. She holds two bachelor degrees from Tel Aviv University in Psychology and Communication & Business Management.


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Customer Reviews

Additionally, the book is a delight to read, clever, clear and practical.
Ido Levran
Also addressed are the many new not typical interfaces entering the fray as well: Smart devices, such as watches, thermostats, etc. that we will also need to consider.
atmj
This book is a must-read for entrepreneurs, UX designers, interaction designers, app developers and product managers.
Lior Gonnen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Bradley on March 10, 2014
Format: Paperback
It's here at last! The go-to guide for academics, practitioners, and start-ups facing an emerging challenge: designing multi-device experiences.

Michal applies her substantial domain expertise to helping designers and others bridge the chasm between legacy design approaches and the principles needed for designing in the increasing complex ecosystem of wearables, mobile, and smart devices. Her applicable methodology enables an approach product teams can use today, as well as a framework entrepreneurs can use to tackle the design challenges of tomorrow. In addition to that, the digestible chapters and ample real-life illustrations make for an enjoyable, highly recallable read! This book is destined to become a staple for those in user experience design.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Grimmy VINE VOICE on May 2, 2014
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Your first reaction is probably to chuckle when reading the back cover. The author is a "senior user experience designer at Google", after all - probably not the best track record for learning anything about user experience design. (Not to excuse Apple or Microsoft for their own considerable gaffes.) But, we think, we should give her a chance. There's always something to learn, right?

The first chapter introduces the idea of the three C's framework: consistence, continuous, and complementary design. Includes a brief history of computing devices such as portable computers, smart phones, tablets, and App stores. You'll probably flip through these to get to the second chapter, although you might be interested in her comparison tables: differences between tactile and touch devices, and differences between native, web, and hybrid apps.

The next chapter talks about consistent design, which is about providing the user the same essential experience across devices. There's a short discussion about optimizing for layout, touch, and form factor. Google search, Hulu plus and Trulia are analyzed to see how consistency is maintained across devices, even though the content provided and layout may be optimized for different screen sizes.

The next chapter addresses continuous design. This is about end to end user experience distributed across devices, a "passing the baton" approach. For example, Kindle syncs your reading experience automatically across your devices. Google drive lets you edit documents across devices as well, in a continuous manner. Another kind of continuous experience, sequenced activities, is discussed, with Allrecipes as an example; a bigger screen device to browse and choose recipes, then a smart phone shopping list grouped by aisle.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By French Julien on August 10, 2014
Format: Paperback
I decided to read this book because I will soon help redesign the digital architecture of a large bank, and in particular their multi-device strategy.

This book is rich in examples and the proposed framework (the so-called "3C": Consistency, Continuity, Complementarity) is rather simple to understand and yet quite holistic.

However, I believe it is insufficiently structured: even though the chapters are divided correctly, each of them contains a myriad of ideas and principles which are not necessarily presented in a logical fashion (the author often jumps from one idea to the other without any strong rational reason). I also find that this book covers several tautologies and could be trimmed down to be made easier to absorb.
Another weakness in my opinion might be the lack of a technical discussion - even though the technology-agnostic approach is warranted, companies need to make technological (and technical) choices and these may be key considerations in the "real world" (especially if the company is a very large, inflexible behemoth: not every company is or aspires to become Google).

Therefore, I find that this book is most suitable to those who are looking to spend a lot of time studying a large number of UX ideas and examples in details, as opposed to those who are looking to gain a structured understanding of this emerging topic through all of the organizational layers - technology, strategy, organisation / human resources, operations, finance ...

To be fair to the author, I still find this a good addition to your library if you are interested in this topic, especially from a UX designer's viewpoint.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Thomas B. Gross VINE VOICE on May 1, 2014
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
If you've done any kind of user-interface work recently you are aware that whatever your primary target platform is, at some point you may want to port your application to another device. Thus for example, if you are controlling a high-speed camera through a web-based design running on a laptop, you know that eventually you will want to control the camera from a tablet and probably from a cellphone. This book goes well beyond a discussion of responsive website design to present a framework describing three different ecology of devices supporting the same application.

About half of the book is devoted to a discussion of what the author calls the "three Cs". Each of the "C"s is an ecology of devices supporting an application.

The first "C" is a "consistent design" where the application appears basically the same on all devices. For example, a google search is pretty much the same thing whether you do it on a PC, an iPad, or a cellphone (although as the author points out, on a cellphone you are more likely to enter your search terms with your voice than with a simulated keyboard).

The second "C" refers to "continuous design" where you can access content, particularly linear content, seemlessly from different devices. A great example of this is an Amazon Kindle which can track the same content whether you are reading it on your Kindle or listening to the audiobook version on your cellphone.

The third "C" are complementary designs where the devices work together to support the same application or user experience but in fundamentally different ways. TV shows that support "second screen" applications on tablets, where the user can read about the show on their iPad while they watch the show on their TV are examples of this kind of user experience.
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