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Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human-Computer Interaction (5th Edition) Hardcover – March 8, 2009

ISBN-13: 978-0321537355 ISBN-10: 0321537351 Edition: 5th

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 624 pages
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall; 5 edition (March 8, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0321537351
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321537355
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 1.1 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #318,087 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

[Software Engineering / User Interface]

Ben Shneiderman & Catherine Plaisant
written in collaboration with Maxine Cohen & Steve Jacobs


Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human-Computer Interaction provides a comprehensive introduction to the dynamic field of human-computer interaction (HCI). An expanded author team brings unparalleled industry and academic experience to this latest edition. Practical techniques, research-supported design guidelines, and a multitude of current examples and figures illustrate good design principles and practices, effectively guiding readers through their first HCI design projects.

The Fifth Edition addresses the profound changes engendered by user-generated content and social media participation, which increase the need for compelling user experiences. Topics covered include:

•    Current HCI issues, with balanced emphasis on mobile devices, the Web, and desktop platforms
•    Innovations in social media and social networking
•    Strategies for enhancing quality of user-generated content
•    Universal usability, sustainable design, and societal transformation
•    Spam, privacy, security, and other contemporary challenges
•    Internationalization issues and customization of consumer electronics
•    Recent research results and innovative commercial products

The Companion Website (www.aw.com/DTUI) includes quizzes, links, discussion questions, additional practice opportunities, and resources for both students and professors.

Visit www.pearsonhighered.com/cs for more information about Addison-Wesley computing books. To order any of our products, contact our customer service department at (800) 824-7799 or (201) 767-5021 outside of the U.S., or visit your campus bookstore.

Addison-Wesley
is an imprint of
PEARSON

Addison-Wesley Computing
Leading Authors • Quality Products

ISBN-10:  0-321-53735-1
ISBN-13:  978-0-32153735-5

About the Author

Ben Shneiderman is a Professor in the Department of Computer Science, Founding Director (1983—2000) of the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory (http://www.cs.umd.edu/hcil), and Member of the Institute for Advanced Computer Studies and the Institute for Systems Research, all at the University of Maryland at College Park. He is a Fellow of the ACM and AAAS and received the ACM CHI (Computer Human Interaction) Lifetime Achievement Award. His books, research papers, and frequent lectures have made him an international leader in this emerging discipline. For relaxation he likes biking, hiking, skiing, and travel.


Catherine Plaisant is Associate Research Scientist at the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory of the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies. She earned a Doctorat d’Ingénieur degree in France in 1982 and has been conducting research in the field of human-computer interaction since then. In 1987, she joined Professor Shneiderman at the University of Maryland, where she has worked with students and members of the lab, throughout the growth of the field of human-computer interaction. Her research contributions range from focused interaction techniques to innovative visualizations validated with user studies to practical applications developed with industrial partners.

 

Maxine S. Cohen is a Professor in the Graduate School of Computer and Information Sciences at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Florida where she teaches graduate courses in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). Before joining NSU, she worked at IBM in the User Centered Design department. Prior to IBM, she was a faculty member in the Computer Science department, in the Watson School of Engineering at the State University of New York at Binghamton. She has been teaching and working in the HCI field for over 20 years. She received a B.A. in Mathematics from the University of Vermont, a M.S. (specialization Computer Science) and a Ph.D. (specialization Systems Science) from the State University of New York at Binghamton.

 

Steven M. Jacobs recently retired from the aerospace industry and is now a lecturer at Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona. He was formerly with Northrop Grumman Mission Systems in Carson, California. Mr. Jacobs managed engineers developing user interface and web applications software for various government and commercial applications. He was also Adjunct Assistant Professor at the University of Southern California for 17 years, where he developed and taught their graduate computer science courses in user interface design and human performance engineering. He has also taught short courses in similar topics for UCLA Extension and ACM.  He received his M.S.C.S. from UCLA, B.A. in Mathematics from Monmouth University (N.J.). 

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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It reads more like a reference book than a textbook.
crystallized
The book explains the core issues in designing usable, useful, efficient and appealing user interfaces.
B. Bederson
I strongly recommend this book for academic and professional HCI courses.
Jaime Sanchez

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jaime Sanchez on September 12, 2009
Format: Hardcover
As a Human-Computer Interaction University Associate Professor I was delighted with the new edition of Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human-Computer Interaction (5th Edition).

It was entirely renewed and fully updated.

I have shared this textbook with my HCI undergraduate and graduate HCI students this semester and they liked it a lot and found it touches well and thoroughly current HCI issues!

Ben Shneiderman and Catherine Plaisant present and discuss timely most key HCI theories, concepts, ideas and applications.

I strongly recommend this book for academic and professional HCI courses.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Lisa Shea HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 14, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've been writing computer code since the 1970s and have seen a wide variety of user interfaces - thermal paper rather than a screen, single-color displays, full color displays, mice, pens, keyboards, and other options. User interfaces are always changing and updating and being tweaked. With that in mind, I find it admirable that a book tries to document exactly what the current state of interfaces is - and not too surprising that the book can become obsolete the moment it comes off the presses.

So a portion of the book is common sense that can apply to creating interfaces in any decade. Your interface needs to be easy for a brand new user to use. It should provide "training wheels" for those new to the system, and then ease them into full use. A well done design should account for both elderly users and disabled users.

Various concepts are covered, like:

gulf of execution - mismatch between user's intentions and allowable actions
gulf of evaluation - mismatch systems representation and user's expectations

On one hand you could say these are good foundations for any designer to understand. You want to create icons that users understand without a thick manual. You want users to be able to quickly get the hang of your system and enjoy using it. But on the other hand, the book almost seems to assume that the user has never seen a keyboard or mouse before starting in to the topic. Surely readers know what a menu is, and how to navigate it. I'm all for books covering the basics and then going on to more complex topics, but the book wallows a little too much in those basics.

Also, the language tends to sway between incredibly simple and incredibly dense.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Potential buyer # 2001395 on March 14, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I loved the older versions of the book, and all those reviews are obsolete since there is a new edition now in March 2009. Would love to see new reviews.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Alfred Inselberg on December 5, 2009
Format: Hardcover
The 5th edition thoroughly updates and improves this valuable resource for students, professionals, and researchers interested in human-computer interaction. The presentation's coherent depth and breadth clarify how the interface mediates our access to information, and the need to match its design to our cognitive and perceptual capabilities. I was especially pleased that my colleagues Shneiderman and Plaisant included a chapter on information visualization also providing a rich list of references on this and other related fields. They make a convincing case for development of new information visualization evaluation tools. The 5th symphony, I meant edition, made me better aware of how mobile devices are changing our world and of the increasing power of YouTube, flickr and other social media. This is a great book!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By HCI faculty on March 29, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I've used this series of books in the classroom and as a reference for years and am delighted to see a new edition!
Strengths are the depth and breadth of coverage, rich reference list and great pictures/images.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Philip Schielke on November 9, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I'm writing this as a computer science instructor, that had very LITTLE familiarity with this field before picking up this book.
The good: It's clear that the authors have a wealth of experience in the field. I actually like the bibliography at the end of each chapter. I'm making my students read some of the journal articles from there. Book covers a broad range of topics.
The bad: This book seems like less of a textbook and more of a survey of the entire breadth of the field. As a computer scientist I often found myself wanting more data, or more details on certain topics. Many of the "findings" of researchers are simply mentioned in passing, as in so-and-so discovered this. Many times I was yearning for more details. Other areas where I didn't want a lot of detail I got more than I wanted. As a die-hard computer scientist I found the book a bit touchy-feely and wishy-washy for my tastes. There seemed to be a lot of subjective statements, and opinions stated without accurately representing the other side. For example the author comes out very strongly against anthropomorphic design (which I tend to agree with), and makes sweeping statements about how users always prefer to NOT have this sort of design. Yet, research in using anthropomorphic interfaces in healthcare has shown that most users prefer such a design (at least in the limited domains of the research.) Many of the revolutionary discoveries in the book my students saw as common sense. (Granted it's hard to see that someone had to invent or discover certain design concepts that we take for granted now.) The students felt they were being talked down to by the author's and longed for more CS heavy material.
I've read journal articles by the first author and they read much better than most of the book.
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