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4.6 out of 5 stars
Destination Moon (The Adventures of Tintin)
Format: HardcoverChange
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on October 16, 1998
Format: Paperback
Along with its sequel, Explorers on the Moon, Destination Moon is the most fully realised of Tintin's adventures. Published over a decade before the lunar landing of 1969, Herge's vision of space travel is a convincing one. Brilliantly illustrated with Herge's unique cinematic style and featuring some excellent villains, as well as hilarious antics from the Thompson Twins, Destination Moon is a must read.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on June 27, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Although this book is geared toward children, it can be enjoyed by adults too. Destination Moon was the first book I read by Herge, and I immediately went on to read the others. The storylines are wonderful - you really get caught up in them! And the pictures are great! That is one thing I really enjoyed about this book - the pictures! You also have to pay attention to Snowy's antics! What a character! This book is a must-read!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on September 2, 1998
Format: Paperback
Herge is the greatest comic drawer in the world. Tintin's adventures are good for both children and adults, maybe even better for adults that children. I am just sorry that Americans don't know these books better, I wish Tintin and Asterix were popular in America the same as they are in Europe and other parts of the world.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on February 14, 2010
Format: Paperback
Cuthbert Calculus disappears; no, he has not been kidnapped as you might have thought (this is a Tintin book, after all, and Calculus is easy prey to kidnappers - see The Seven Crystal Balls and The Calculus Affair), he has gone off to Syldavia to help the scientists there build a rocket to explore the moon. The notion that the scientific genius can invite his friends to join him on a space crew, and they will all function in scientific roles, is of course preposterous, but it makes for a fun story. To spice up a relatively dull tale of scientific development there is a bit of mystery: who's the spy? What are Thomson and Thompson doing in Greek national costumes if they're not in Greece? And what use is it to take Snowy to the moon anyway?

Lots of great physical comedy, like when Haddock inadvertently tears apart the chair that Baxter is sitting in, or Snowy's, or the detectives' arresting a skeleton. Calculus with his hearing aid, or pulling his hair out when his radio-controlled rocket gets taken over, is pretty hilarious too. Of course, the classic is when Haddock tells Calculus he's "acting the goat" - Calculus erupts with a furious temper tantrum, showing a withering sarcasm and superhuman strength, all the while chiding Haddock for his clumsiness. Just as funny is Haddock's scared, wide-eyed reaction to his friend's fury - he's totally tongue-tied; nothing like our favourite characters acting out of character. There's also the detectives using reverse psychology on Haddock when it seems like he wants out of the mission (Tintin often uses the same method, usually with the help of a bottle of whiskey as in Tintin in Tibet, but it's interesting to see the detectives be clever in spite of themselves). Of course, the ever-present amnesia episode is interesting enough, but ultimately nothing can delay the inevitable: the moon must be launched into space. So it is, leading to the inevitable part 2: "Explorers on the Moon"!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Format: Paperback
The first Tintin book I ever owned, and along with the second part (Explorers on the moon) is still the one I love the best. A witty, clever tale with suprise twists and turns, great characters and all those fantastic drawings of the spacecraft itself. These two books played a huge part in starting my love affair with SF, and I'd even say they influenced my decision to write novels of my own (now happily published)

If you want to see how a true master does it, buy this book. Just make sure you pick up Explorers on the Moon at the same time.
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on September 25, 2013
Format: Paperback
It is easy to like Tintin every time. Whether in America, Scotland or Peru, Tintin, affable and loyal Snowy, Captain Haddock and cohorts are an adventurous lot who do well as they get embroiled in treks, troubles and trysts the world over. Very often the smart reporter-hero relies on circumstance and luck, not only to succeed, but also to become involved in thrilling affairs in the first place. This is nowhere more true than in Destination Moon. In this volume Tintin, Snowy, Haddock et al are off to the moon and for no known reason why. Their selection is entirely owing to their personal relationship with the brains behind the mission - never mind capability, capacity, training or any other qualification. This is just plain never explained away. Tintin is fast cured and cured enough to become an astronaut, Calculus the same and more.
Nonetheless, the story is a ton of fun. Space exploration, travel, intrigue and murder are afoot. The technology is exciting and impressive - especially so given how it came some twenty years before man actually landed on the moon. The choice of Syldavia (the same country depicted in King Ottokar's Sceptre) is curious, but at least Herge does not submit to the clichéd American manifest destiny stereotype. The country, if the rocket's trajectory is anything to go by is either at modern day Slovakia or Hungary.
As a side note, the goofy non-brother detectives are Thomson and Thompson, but Snowy calls them "the Thomson twins." The illustrations are as expressive and precise as always. Twenty years after beginning the series revolving around his Belgian boy reporter Herge's hand as adept as ever.
The story comes to a conclusion in Explorers on the Moon (The Adventures of Tintin)
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on June 30, 2012
Format: Hardcover
A trip to the moon? At the time "Destination Moon" was written, it had not been done. The planning of a trip to the moon is the apotheosis of Professor Calculus's scientific abilities. Readers of "Destination Moon" also have the rare privilege of seeing normally near-deaf Professor Calculus understand and respond to the spoken word, thanks to a hearing aid; after all, this is necessary if you are building a moon rocket.

Always a master of atmosphere, Herge establishes an aura of secrecy from the start. After Tintin and the Captain arrive in Syldavia, the fictional country introduced in "King Ottokar's Sceptre," they are abruptly whisked upward to a high-up mountain valley by secret police. The setting is the Sprodj Atomic Research Center, where a nuclear rocket is being constructed.

In addition to planning the trip to the moon, Tintin and company battle sabotage and spying in connection with the moon rocket and its planned flight. Not only do the villains penetrate the Center, they manage to gain control of a test rocket that is destroyed to keep it out of their hands. Mixing nuclear science and spying, Herge manufactures a drama with undertones of the most cataclysmic type of danger and also leaves the reader gasping about what might be in store in the sequel.

Herge made tremendous efforts to present an intricately detailed and realistic moon rocket 16 years before Neil Armstrong landed on the moon. In general, he displays technical skill in his design of the rocket and understanding of rocket science, but it has been pointed out that some of the science is flawed.

Captain Haddock, aside from falling victim to his customary slapstick goofs, is embattled by the prospect of what he is being asked to do: "Me, go to the moon?" Indeed, we see the ultimate clash of egos between the Captain and Professor Calculus. When he feels insulted by Captain Haddock, Professor Calculus gets hot-headed. After making an extended tantrum parade, he gets amnesia because of an accident, and how he gets his memory back makes for a great scene.

I give no spoilers by saying the book ends as the rocket proceeds to the moon. The excellent sequel, "Explorers on the Moon," completes the saga. I rate "Destination Moon" four stars, but it is a four and a half, just below round-up to five stars, which I almost gave it.
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Format: Paperback
Belgian artist Herge wrote "Destination Moon" as an adventure for his cartoon hero, the young journalist Tintin, in 1953, sixteen years before Apollo 11 accomplished the real feat. Given that manned space flight itself was still just a concept, "Destination Moon" holds up remarkably well as a well-written tale of science fiction and adventure.

As the story opens, Tintin and his seafaring friend Captain Haddock return to Marlinspike to find that Professor Calculus has been missing for weeks. Calculus sends a timely telegram inviting Tintin and the Captain to the Balkan state of Syldavia, featured in an earlier story. Tintin and the Captain embark on a mysterious trip, sheparded along by unidentified security men to a remote complex deep in the Syldavian mountains. There,they find Professor Calculus, who astounds them by inviting them along on a voyage to the Moon. In an hilarious scene with the nearly deaf Calculus, the two find themselves inadvertantly seconded to the mission.

And what a mission it is. Herge takes the time in this, the first of a two-part story, to imagine the engineering, space suits, and other logistics of a trip to the Moon. He also introduces a sinister plot by outsiders to sabotage the Moon rocket and steal the technology. This plot very nearly costs Tintin and the Captain their lives, and comes close to derailing the whole project. Against this rather grim storyline, the bumbling detectives Thompson and Thomson, and reluctant astronaut Captain Haddock provide more than the usual comic relief. The story ends in a nice cliff-hanger hooking into the concluding portion, "Explorers on the Moon."

"Destination Moon" is very highly recommended to fans of Tintin of all ages.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on June 5, 2012
Format: Paperback
got this for my son for xmas to finish off his set. he really enjoys reading it. and im glad he likes it too. its in comic book form so its easy reading. great thing to buy if your wanting to encourage reading more.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on April 16, 2011
Format: Paperback
We have been reading the TinTin books to my grandson since he was three (he is now five). He loves them. I do believe we have almost all of them. Amazon's prices on new paperbacks are better than Powell's.
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