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20 of 27 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Let them eat cake Pts. 1 and 2
Do they really have this much contempt for their fans? That stupid bonus guitar solo, a horrible hiccup (thanks other reviewers for pointing that out, so it wasn't me hearing things), a totally unnecessary low frequency boost-the original was ingenious in how it pulled your ears into the mix, this modern beat down really takes alot of the nuance and art out of the...
Published 20 months ago by S. Mehaffey

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64 of 71 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Unnecessary Revisit
There are alot of negative reviews for this disc which was rumoured to be a double disc event. For a 35th Anniversary reissue, this is not at all worthy of that moniker. It is a disappointing revist to say the least. Bob Ezrin approached KISS about this remix because he wanted to do something for its 35th. But the thing about Ezrin's recording is that so much of it was...
Published 20 months ago by Mr Freeze


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64 of 71 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Unnecessary Revisit, August 25, 2012
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This review is from: Destroyer- Resurrected (Audio CD)
There are alot of negative reviews for this disc which was rumoured to be a double disc event. For a 35th Anniversary reissue, this is not at all worthy of that moniker. It is a disappointing revist to say the least. Bob Ezrin approached KISS about this remix because he wanted to do something for its 35th. But the thing about Ezrin's recording is that so much of it was premixed during the making of it and many of the tracks were recorded "wet" (meaning that there was no way to EVER alter its effects, etc). So, from the get-go, this project had many limitations, as he notes in the cd booklet. There are differences, however. For examples, an omitted background vocal from the archived tape of "Detroit Rock City" makes its debut along with an added effect to the end of the last verse. Also, Ace's stinging feedback intro to "King..." isn't as prominent. The piano is more upfront in "Great Expectations" . And there are other such differences throughout. Then there is "Sweet Pain" with a different solo (I, myself, was hoping that the different solo was going to be an Ace Frehley outtake) and louder harmonized gang vocals folowing the guitar part. Overall, the mix is more present. The piano agumentations on some songs is not as noticable (eg, Detroit...) and in the process it sounds more "band" like because it sounds more like just the four guys. The opposite approach could have produced a KISS Symphony version . The drum sound (as noticed in the beginning of "Shout...") is tighter, with less air.

With all of the differences, however, this release is "nothing new" and the lack of fanfare is most distressing. Diehard fans will notice the differences but those who are just coming to the band will not even be able to appreciate them. So, for a 35th Anniversary, this really is targeted at diehards. If this present disc had been accompanied with a second disc of demos and outtakes, then there would hardly have been any negative reviews. The Remix is great for what it is. The packaging is good (although they SHOULD HAVE altered the color of the back to match the front artwork). The black disc even has a faux record label. There is so much that is good about this issue. But the complaints are valid. The bonus track is the original solo to "Sweet Pain"? THAT doesn't qualify for an Anniversary acknowledgement. KISS has just rejoined Universal Music Group. They have nearly all of KISS' recorded stuff. There is plenty that they could have included. A live DVD or cd would have been SOMETHING. A stripped bonus disc would have been SOMETHING. A symphony remix as a bonus disc would have been SOMETHING. But what they have issued--great as it may be sonically--is unremarkable in value. I have bought this album in several formats numerous times. I don't regret buying this version, either. BUT all of it was unnecessary. Want to revisit something? How about a remix and remaster of Hot In The Shade? Some of the 80s percussive things on that disc, particularly "Read My Body" need an exit. How about a guitar-dominant remix of Unmasked? What if you release a version of The Elder with Ace's guitar parts present? There's a lot that could be remixed and remastered in the KISS World. BUT--and it's a big one--do it with determination. I'm not knocking Ezrin's remix. The disapointment is not with this issue's sonics. It's with its packaging, what it does not do because of what it does not include.

Bottom line is that completists and die hards will buy it. New fans won't appreciate the differences. And most will feel cheated.
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135 of 168 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Another KI$$ Ca$h-Grab, August 21, 2012
This review is from: Destroyer- Resurrected (Audio CD)
This is garbage. Gene and Paul had nothing to do with it because they don't own the masters of their original studio albums anymore, so this was done totally by Ezrin. Yes everything is remixed marginally, so if you've been listening to Destroyer for decades you will notice slight differences. But where is the bonus stuff? This was originally advertised as a two disc set with demos, live stuff etc. None of that made it, not even the already-released demos that appeared on the 2001 KISS Box set, let alone stuff like "None of Your Business" (sung by Peter) that was demoed at the time. Where is all the live stuff? There are countless Destroyer-era concerts professionally recorded. Also, the blurb about this cover being the original 1975 Ken Kelly painting is bogus. The original 1975 rough image that was rejected by Casablanca for being "too violent" is available on the web, it's the one that is seen in KISStory and on the KISS My A## DVD. This version is a modern repainting of that, done by Ken Kelly in the last ten years. It's signed "1975" which is another fabrication. Seems that nothing KISS does these days isn't surrounded by lies and false advertising? To sum it up, this is a massive wasted opportunity. See the excellent "Deluxe Edition" series for how this SHOULD have been done - a second disc full of live stuff, rare demos, working mixes etc. Not this ca$h-grab that ultimately, with the exception of one previously-unheard guitar solo, offers nothing. Also : there are glitches in the mastering of this, there are several pops and clicks and errors which have been discussed in length on the KISS forums. There is a glaringly obvious bad edit in the intro to "Flaming Youth" that makes the whole song skip a beat. This is garbage.
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22 of 27 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Pretty unneccesary, BUT, August 23, 2012
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This review is from: Destroyer- Resurrected (Audio CD)
It is cool to see this CD get some kind of treatment after all these years. Granted, there is not a heck of a lot to hold your hopes on. The remix is not bad, but it does take away a lot of the mysticism and allure from the original. The Original version was kind of dark and had a muddy sound that was really different for its time. When I was a kid i would stare at the cover all day and just listen in awe to the darker vibe of Kiss. Very, very different from the straight, clean sounding 'Dressed to Kill' which was their prior studio effort. These songs were longer, more adventurous and the album as a whole had a great flow to it. A lot of that (in fact most of that) can be attributed to Bob Ezrin and his more artistic approach to producing. The layers he created, the effects, the orchestration and slower songs all made this album the perfect showcase to go with the bands image and show. What an album for its time. A true classic.

Then there is this. It isnt over the top different, but just enough to make it slide more to the 'rock' style of Kiss. Some of that darkness is lost a little but it really doesn't do it much harm either. I still would prefer the Original version easily over this. BUT be forewarned that myself and most others writing negative stuff grew up on this album. We worshiped it. Knew all the words to all the songs, had posters on our walls and this album was the reason for that. We probably have all heard this 1000+ times. So a bias is definitely there. Why change a masterpiece that holds so many memories? Well, really, after 35 years why not.

My biggest disappointment is that it didnt go a little further with content. As with many others, we have probably all bought this album 15 times since 76 on 4 different formats, so adding some unique and unheard tracks or takes would have been nice. They know all the diehards will buy it anyway but we hate just completing our collections. We want, and deserve a bit more than this after so many years. It fact, this just feels like they are sticking their toes in the water. Surely a double CD, Limited, w/DVD would have been more of a celebration of this classic, than this single CD w/o even a bonus track. A previous song with a different solo hardly gets the heart beating for diehards. There is plenty of space on the CD that could have been used and made us feel a little better about the whole thing. Face it, not many new fans are coming to the table at this point and most will buy the original. For us, who spend another 10 bucks on a CD we have heard 1000 times, its light. Plus, that hiccup before 'Sweet Pain', as others stated, is inexcusable. Major oversight.

I do, however, believe that the booklet and notes by Ezrin are nice, and I do believe blowing the dust of this classic doesn't hurt as a teaser for the new CD coming out in the fall. Ezrin deserves another paycheck from this CD as he made it great to begin with. He did not ruin this by any means and in fact, some of the tracks do have an element of added energy from the boost in technology. I just still have to stay true to the original.

Hey, at least its not another best of. It has its qualities and isn't a terrible reissue. It just is not essential and not a proper homage to such a classic release.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Happy to have vinyl, not happy to have it so limited, August 21, 2012
By 
Scott R. Harding (St. Johns, MI USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Destroyer- Resurrected (Vinyl)
I'm in agreement with earlier reviewers who lament the lack of bonus materials on this release. Sure, having "Sweet Pain" with a different solo is nice, but there were LOTS of additional songs recorded for "Destroyer" that could have been - and were originally rumored to be - included on this package. A "Deluxe Edition" a la recent Def Leppard releases would have been a truly spectacular 5-star item. I'll enjoy the vinyl version of "Destroyer," especially with the original artwork, but this will be the fifth time I've purchased this album now: 1976 vinyl, 1982 cassette, 1986 CD, and 1998 remastered CD. *sigh* Fool me once, shame on you, fool me five times...well, you get the picture. Still a classic album by the hottest band in the world...but it could have been REALLY special, and this just isn't.

ETA: I can confirm that 1) the vinyl DOES include the "skip" at measure 4, beat 1 of "Flaming Youth" (and wow, what a numbskull mistake to have on the final mastered copy!), and 2) the vinyl DOES NOT include the second version of "Sweet Pain." Beautiful, 180 gram LP, nice liner notes, but the track listing is for the CD only! That, combined with the unforgivable mistake at the beginning of "Flaming Youth," makes me really shake my head with regret.
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20 of 27 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Let them eat cake Pts. 1 and 2, August 22, 2012
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This review is from: Destroyer- Resurrected (Audio CD)
Do they really have this much contempt for their fans? That stupid bonus guitar solo, a horrible hiccup (thanks other reviewers for pointing that out, so it wasn't me hearing things), a totally unnecessary low frequency boost-the original was ingenious in how it pulled your ears into the mix, this modern beat down really takes alot of the nuance and art out of the material. Guys, if there was ever a record that did not need to be revamped it is this one. Fàctor in the famine of the absolute bare bones, dried well of any bonus tracks and this is another kick in the stomach to the folks. Comes close to chicanery.

Three days later:

Taking into account now how badly this was marketed, it overpromised and underdelivered, it's supposed to be the other way around.....

This Destroyer on steroids grew on me. What I really like is how this could be played on modern rock radio and it would obliterate the other songs; this material is just too superior to anything coming out of rock radio for decades; and now, with this reboot really showcasing that, hey if this was a new release, run for cover kiddies; the modern touches of guitars and effects popping out of the mix makes this sound totally contemporary. I like how this gives Kiss a new weightiness they could never capture in the studio in the 70s (until side 4 of Alive II); finally the marriage of The Beatles and Led Zeppelin. Like now maybe people will stop babbling about how great "Creatures" is. "Great Expectations" actually works now, although "Do You Love Me?" suffers most from this new treatment. And as much nonsense Paul and Gene spew about Ace and Peter, yes Peter did get himself thrown out of Kiss there is no disputing that, but don't rewrite history guys; it's great to hear Peter's stellar performance like this. And about that guitar solo: trust me Ace was sitting in a chair slumped over during a long day of recording, that was probably his first stab at it. Finally, I do wish to let my fist impression stand, the original being so stealth like as to only call it art; the clubbing about the head here, a sign of the times..but again, Kiss resurrected...how cool is that?
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Far and away their best album, June 26, 2011
By 
B. S. Marlay (Sydney, Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Destroyer (Audio CD)
After `Alive' broke them commercially with the smash hit anthem, `Rock and Roll All Nite', expectations would, I imagine, have been extremely high. So what better idea than to team up with the stratospherically successful producer of another theatrical rock act for their next studio album? It was clearly a master stroke. Bob Ezrin was behind the ongoing success of Alice Cooper (`School's Out', `Billion Dollar Babies', `Welcome To My Nightmare') and he delivered wholesale with `Destroyer', both wiping the band's earlier albums off the map and setting a creative benchmark that they would never ever reach again.

`Destroyer' is an epic - darker, more energetic, more theatrical, beautifully crafted, cleverly written and grand at every turn - a soaring hard rock musical vision that befitted and delivered on the physical image and stage show the band had created for themselves. Though it sports radio play introductions, strings and choirs on various tracks, these features are never allowed to overwhelm the group, ensuring that the end product is whole-heartedly hard rock. It has the feel of a concept album, but it isn't.

Beginning with a news report about a youth killed in a head-on collision against what sounds like the crash scene, complete with Kiss playing on the car radio, `Detroit Rock City' is the dramatic opener which literally crashes into `King of the Night Time World' followed by the cacophonous `God of Thunder'. Elsewhere a children's choir embellishes Gene Simmons on `Great Expectations' and a string section backs Peter Criss on the band's first and best ballad, `Beth'.

One of the album's great strengths is the creative involvement of the entire band. Again Paul Stanley's fingerprints are all over it, writing or co-writing 6 of the 9 songs. Gene Simmons even sings Stanley's `God of Thunder' completely making it his own, and writes or co-writes 4 of the other songs. `Flaming Youth' sounds like Ace Frehley had a heavy hand in it as co-writer and Bob Ezrin's compositional involvement in 7 of the 9 tracks clearly elevates the material. Though Kiss would resort unsuccessfully to trying to emulate the success of `Rock and Roll All Nite' throughout their career, the anthemic `Flaming Youth' and `Shout It Out Loud' never feel like poor cousins to that hit, nor are they remotely corny (the trap of later attempts). In fact there is not a weak moment on this album. It is quite literally a masterpiece. And the 1997 remaster sounds fantastic.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Shout could have been louder..., August 21, 2012
By 
ShanghaiSally02 (Atlanta, GA, USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Destroyer- Resurrected (Audio CD)
So here it is...
I've been waiting, (like so many others out there) for Destroyer to come out once more!
What hit me first, while listening to the songs was the much louder, cleaner and airier feel to the tracks.
A lot of small stuff comes through, like Peter's bass drum kicking on "Detroit Rock City", enormous bass sound on "God Of Thunder", and in my opinion a nice suprise...the acoustic guitar on "Beth", which you can here throughout the entire song! Nice one! Bob Ezrin did a very professional job on Destroyer, and sort of brought the album to our technological era, without polishing it too much or taking away the organic feel. A '76 version ready for the next years...so to speak. The '75 cover has a bigger impact than the original painting, and looks amazing as LP. Happy that amazon was selling Resurrected also in vinyl form. Bless the black circe!
The CD booklet is thick, very informative with an old stylish layout. Photos are interesting, but nothing really new.
Very unfortunately is the fact that, the "lost treasures" were kept to a ridiculously BARE minumum. "Sweet Pain" with lost guitar solo/harmonies was included as track 6, making the only real musical goodie here part of the original set. I don't think there was need to then add "Sweet Pain" (original version) as a bonus(???)track. The lost "Beth" vocals (hahaha), which I'm sure many of us including me, thought/hoped to be an entire verse, bridge or at least some more words, turned out to be a second ahaaaaaaaa harmony, which was mixed into the middle of the song - piano part following the second chorus.
Really?? Probably the same ahaaaaaaaa Peter sang at the end, just copied.
Well, I am giving Resurrected 4 stars. Four members that changed the musical landscape, an album that belongs into the annals of hardrock music, and one of the best album covers of all time! Besides that the price, at least for the CD is fair enough.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Noble Effort from One of Rock's Greatest Producers, December 1, 2012
By 
D. Levy (Detroit, MI USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Destroyer- Resurrected (Audio CD)
Some famous albums that have received the remix treatment can come off great. I think about Iggy and the Stooges' "Raw Power," which got even more power on the 1997 Iggy remix, and even if there was a fair amount of clipping, it was really an occupational hazard in making the album deservedly heavier. The Beatles' catalog that got an upgrade in 2009 made us rediscover the music all over again, because it all sounded so fresh and vibrant. And Derek and the Dominoes' "Layla" didn't lose any of its integrity when it got remixed in 1990.

Then there are the clunkers. Remember when Ozzy's "Blizzard of Ozz" and "Diary of a Madman" had their drums and bass parts re-recorded? Yeah, I heard a collective "Blecch" when those came out.

This year, it was learned that Bob Ezrin was going to remix "Destroyer," which is on my top five list of greatest albums ever made (two other Kiss albums -- "Alive!" and "Kiss" -- are on the list, too), and I was apprehensive. Do you really want to tinker with greatness, even if you're one of the greatest producers in rock history? And after 35 years of listening to the same mix, was I going to be disappointed?

But I was happy to give this a listen, and I liked what I heard. While it doesn't replace the 1976 classic, it definitely complements it.

Here, you'll find significant differences. A lot of things have been cleaned up, little touches and nuances that will become evident to those who have listened to the original "Destroyer" religiously. They include boosted and/or added vocals from the original sessions (most apparent on the chorus to "King of the Night Time World"), and more elements that either haven't been noticed or were otherwise buried sonically. On "Beth," for instance, you hear more of the acoustic guitar in the intro, and on "Detroit Rock City" and "King of the Night Time World," the vocals seem more layered. Also, on "Great Expectations," the part where Gene Simmons sings "I'm a million miles away" has been fixed.

Some things I didn't like, though, such as the "You gotta lose your life in Detroit Rock City" line that's been added to "Detroit Rock City" here, and the "Get down!" line on the final chorus (you heard them on the "Double Platinum" version, too). An alternate guitar solo is put onto "Sweet Pain," and it doesn't have the same fluidity as the Dick Wagner solo on the original mix (that mix is included here as a bonus track). The intro to "Flaming Youth" has a bit of a tempo gaffe. And the boosted boom in the car crash at the end of "DRC" really wasn't necessary, as the impact on the original was lurid enough.

What's kinda cool here is the restored cover. It was considered too graphic for its time -- the burning city in the background apparently got the brass at the record company antsy -- but is more notable for the members' "Alive!" costumes, and the "blue" cover is presented in the booklet so you can compare. (That is, unless you got the MP3 version, which I'd advise against, because Ezrin penned the liner notes; there are rare photos including Ezrin in a top hat and tux with the Kiss members in the studio; and they made the CD look like an actual LP, with the original Casablanca label and both sides of the disc in black.)

The thing about Ezrin's productions is that he brings an atmospheric element to them all. Listen to Alice Cooper's "Alice Cooper Goes to Hell," and you'll best experience the ominous, doomy vibe that became Ezrin's signature sound. Then there's Lou Reed's "Berlin," Peter Gabriel's first album, Pink Floyd's "The Wall" and even Kiss' ill-fated "Music from the Elder," all of which had an ethereal quality to them, an other-worldly vibe that both comforted and scared you. That was especially true of "Destroyer," which brought Kiss' image to superhero (maybe even demigod) status based not just on the costumes, but the themes within the music.

I think he did this as a labor of love, to go back and say, "If I could have had the time to do things a little better, what would I have done?" He deserves a pat on the back from me. While it doesn't erase the original from my mind -- nothing ever will -- Ezrin's 2012 remix is something to balance it off, and acts more as something for the die-hard Kiss fan to study and hopefully enjoy.

I know there are a lot of folks out there who won't like this version, and that's their right. But keep in mind, a lot of Kiss fans didn't like the original album when it originally came out either, and it grew on them as time went on. (Some could say the same about "Music from the Elder," which is less a fiasco in terms of Kisstory but more a curiosity that deserves to be revisited. I leave that for another debate, though.) I'd say give this a listen with an open mind and don't be so quick to judge it by the changes made. It still rocks, and it just might make you want to "Shout It Out Loud" even louder.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential Kiss, March 18, 2004
This review is from: Destroyer (Audio CD)
Destroyer is by many fans rated as their best studio effort.
This was the album where Kiss had to prove that they were more than a live spectacle, and show their best songs. And they did just that.
1. Detroit Rock City - One Kiss' most celebrated songs. High energy. Great guitars, drums & vocals. This was the song that showed straight away that Kiss could come up with some amazing stuff. It has almost never left the setlist since.
2. King Of The Night Time World - Follows DRC like a brother. Criss' galloping drums is a real treat here. There's nothing like this track to get the blood pumping.
3. God Of Thunder - Gene's showcase number. Dark & eerie with one great riff after another. Stanley wrote it. This was a type of song that really hadn't been explored by Kiss before. Heavy indeed.
4. Great Expectations - A laid back beautiful song by Simmons.
Has a part from some classical number. Not a typical Kiss song, but surely just as good.
5. Flaming Youth - Anthem rocker. Didn't quite work out as a classic the way Kiss had hoped, but fits the album well. One of the few forgotten diamonds from this album.
6. Sweet Pain - The only song off the album which hasn't been played in concert. Very cool drum rhythm, and chorus. I like it.
7. Shout It Out Loud - This was The anthem here. Gene & Paul trading vocals with a chorus you'll never forget. Rock'n Roll.
8. Beth - Criss' classic ballad took everybody by surprise, even the band. This was the song that made this album a chart success and put Kiss in the big league. Good song, but I still think it's the weakest on the album.
9. Do You Love Me - I love this one. No song so simple should be this cool. Resurrected for the reunion tour in 96, and have become a standard. Great version on this album.
This album is a safe bet. No weak songs. Cool productions. Great playing. Essential.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More like 4 1/2 stars, but WHAT a 4 1/2 star record!, April 15, 2003
This review is from: Destroyer (Audio CD)
KISS had something to prove after the runaway success of "ALIVE!" and they pulled out all the stops for "Destroyer." First off, they hired Bob Ezrin, who was responsible for forging the chaos of Alice Cooper into a multi-platinum band. They also had never made any bones about the fact that they didn't just want to be stars, they wanted to be MEGA-STARS, so there aren't too many risks involved. (With the exception of recording the strings on "Beth," perhaps.) They were - thanks to "Alive!" - crowned one of the hardest, greatest working live bands in the world, now they wanted to make it clear they could lay it down on record as well.
So into the studio they went, and out popped a semi-conceptual album about each member of the band. There's Paul the Love God ("Do You Love Me?"), Gene the Demon King ("Sweet Pain," and "God Of Thunder"), Ace the rocker ("Detroit Rock City") and Peter as the sentimental love cat ("Beth"). Ezrin's touch is obvious in the opener "Detroit Rock City's" car/radio/crash sound effects, and of course the squealing kids that pop up in "God Of Thunder." Layering the production with keyboards and overdubs also brought out the best in the band's compostional skills.
Between Ezrin and KISS, "Destroyer" finally shows off the band's musical muscle. Criss' playing in "D.R.C." is standout, and the band gets crunchy on "Do You Love Me?" On the other hand, things gets a little too obvious with "Flaming Youth," which sounds cribbed from Alice Cooper's Department of the same territory, and "Shout It Out Loud," tries way too hard to be "Rock And Roll All Night Pt 2." Save those minor missteps and you have one fine rocking album. "Destroyer" was polished enough to give us long suffering fans the dose of KISS we'd always known they were capable of, gave the band some of the critical respect that was due them, and perpetuated the KISS course to rock domination that they had worked so hard to attain.
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