Destruction and Reconstruction and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.95
  • Save: $1.74 (11%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Destruction and Reconstru... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by happycustomers
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Regular shelf-wear. Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Destruction and Reconstruction: Personal Experiences of the Late War (Southern Classics Series) Paperback – October 6, 1998


See all 66 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, October 6, 1998
$14.21
$10.93 $1.20
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$15.00

Frequently Bought Together

Destruction and Reconstruction: Personal Experiences of the Late War (Southern Classics Series) + North Over South: Northern Nationalism and American Identity in the Antebellum Era
Price for both: $33.15

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Southern Classics Series
  • Paperback: 274 pages
  • Publisher: J.S. Sanders Books (October 6, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 187994121X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1879941212
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,359,262 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Richard Taylor, the only son of President Zachary Taylor, was born at his father’s plantation, Springfield, outside Louisville, Kentucky in 1826. He graduated from Yale in 1845, and spent most of the succeeding years in Mississippi and Louisiana, where he became a sugar planter and earned a reputation as politician, gentleman-scholar and raconteur. A delegate to the Democratic convention in 1860, he worked there to avert the disruption of the Northern and Southern wings.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By William S. Grass on October 2, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
At the time I write this review I am surprised to find there are only two others before me, and they are both from Louisiana, the state in which Richard Taylor resided at the outbreak of the war and which he so tirelessly strove to defend from Union depredations. A complex man, Taylor could be a stern martinet one moment, and then wax eloquent, displaying an artistic appreciation of life the next. Early on we see him ordering the execution of two of Wheat's Tigers for insubordination. Later, we see him transfixed by a flying bluebird the morning of First Winchester.

Taylor's memoir deserves to be preserved not just as an academic curiosity, but because it is the expression of a now extinct class of men who, regardless of their lofty status in society, considered it their personal responsibility to put themselves into harm's way, to lead from the front instead of sending young men out to die while they remain safely at home. As a memoir of war Destruction and Reconstruction is non pareil, due to its flourishes of erudition and vivid accounts of the battles and personalities described therein. The biblical, mythological, historical and literary references are legion and display an education unlike any in the nineteenth century South. Some graduate student should make a project of cataloging and footnoting these references for an expanded edition. Be sure to mention me in the acknowledgements.

I strongly encourage anyone wanting to read Destruction and Reconstruction to first obtain and read Parrish's bio on Taylor, for a broader background in understanding Taylor and where he came from but also for the maps which are absent from the memoir.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Buenoslibros.es on June 3, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The most interesting thing about this book is that you get to read a first hand account of the War between the States, from one of the greatest military heads of either the North or South. And also a very cultured man. His culture comes out prominently, almost too much so. When one just wants to read about how it was, the War and the so-called Reconstruction, it becomes a little tiring to have to take in with it also all the references to European military history, ancient history et al. Those names of old generals and foreign politicians of by-gone times are just a bother to the reader.

And that brings me to -what I think is- the reason for the failing aspect of this book: It was meant for Taylor's contemporaries. It just feels from the start that the man is taking for granted that the reader knows much of the "story", and he is just telling another side to it: his own side. It is a readable book though, and entertaining, if you discount the pretension alluded to. And it is a definite contribution to the South's take on the whole conflict and the times. Elegant, sad, and full of Southern sentiment.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By dive1tom on October 9, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If your needing a really good review of Civil War history this is the book. From the beginning to the end of the Civil War and after. Tell's why the South fought and lost. Personal opinions of other southern generals are expressed by Taylor. Taylor would have taken New Orleans back! Taylor's love of the South and of Louisianan is put together marvelously.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 21 people found the following review helpful By David Caskey on September 17, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is a must read for anyone who desires a true understanding of the war and aftermath before our historical perspectives are forever changed with the new history being written by liberal professors. It clearly accounts for the crimes of the reconstruction which is a topic that is definitely being rewritten by those that desire to protray the US as some type of force for good.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jerry Bowers on November 24, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've always wanted to know more about Richard Taylor, and how he became a Southern General, Can't think of a better way to learn than from his own personal experiences...I highly recommend this book for those interested in the civil war and the behind the scene deals.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Harvey H. Hutchins on December 19, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
General Taylor's surprising written eloquence together with his personal participation in the subject matter of this book is extremely valuable to having a correct understanding of the events.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ipy on November 25, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This memoir by Confederate General Richard Taylor is usually considered one of the best and least biased by a general officer. I can attest that it lives up to this reputation and that it is, overall, an very informative and enjoyable read. Taylor had a gift for writing and, if you tolerate his frequent classical and historical references, your time will not be wasted reading it.

His service began as a brigade commander in the east and this is highlighted by his lengthy account of the Valley campaign. He also wrote very memorable, and often cited, descriptions of his fellow officers, including Ewell and Jackson. Taylor is then promoted to command of the Department of Louisiana west of the Mississippi. This is the best section of the book and is full of excellent details regarding this little known theater, though I recommend consulting a map when reading. Of particular interest are his musings on the vulnerability of Federal gunboats, the material and geographical difficulties of operations in the theater, and the repeated ingenuity shown by his men to overcome them. Taylor brilliantly recounts the battles at Mansfield and Pleasant Hill and is very critical of Kirby Smith for allowing Banks and Porter to escape from the Red River. Taylor later takes command in Alabama and Mississippi during the closing months of the war and surrendered the last major Confederate force east of the Mississippi. His insights on seeing the Confederacy fall from his position in an out of the way theater is fascinating. The last part of the book recounts Reconstruction under both Johnson and Grant. This section is easily the most biased and least valuable, though it does contain some interesting information. I suspect the passions of that period had not cooled like those of the war itself.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?