Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.99
  • Save: $3.50 (19%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Detective LaRue: Letters from the Investigation Hardcover – September 1, 2004


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$14.49
$2.72 $0.01



Frequently Bought Together

Detective LaRue: Letters from the Investigation + Dear Mrs. LaRue: Letters from Obedience School (LaRue Books)
Price for both: $28.53

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Top 20 Books for Kids
See the books our editors' chose as the Best Children's Books of 2014 So Far or see the lists by age: Baby-2 | Ages 3-5 | Ages 6-8 | Ages 9-12 | Nonfiction

Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Lexile Measure: 950L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic Press; First Edition edition (September 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0439458684
  • ISBN-13: 978-0439458689
  • Product Dimensions: 12.2 x 9.7 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #275,004 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Kindergarten-Grade 3–As in Dear Mrs. LaRue (Scholastic, 2002), "local dog" Ike LaRue tells his story through a series of misleading letters to his owner. When two neighborhood cats disappear, the pup winds up a jailed suspect. A black-and-white illustration depicts his pitiful plight as he would like Mrs. LaRue to imagine it–sadly blowing on a harmonica in jail. The real situation, in which he shares doughnuts and coffee with a friendly police officer, is revealed in a color illustration on the same spread. This type of juxtaposition continues as Ike slips out to track down the cats on his own. Pictures reveal that the tireless legwork he describes to his owner is actually time spent relaxing in a luxury hotel. Despite his life of ease, the pooch finally does find the missing felines, and he becomes a hero. The contrast between the melodrama of Ike's imagined world and the comfort of his true experiences should elicit many smiles. The placement of the color and black-and-white scenes varies with each spread, which helps prevent the pictorial construct from being predictable or repetitive. Teague's visual characterizations of animals and people are also a treat. Ike displays a variety of emotions and attitudes, often subtly conveyed by posture, facial expression, or even just the tilt of an eyebrow. The cat-bashing references in the dog's letters add another touch of humor to this satisfying epistolary tale.–Steven Engelfried, Beaverton City Library, OR
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

K-Gr. 3. In Teague's sequel to Dear Mrs. LaRue (2002), a pair of cats hungry for canary flesh have escaped their apartment and left Ike holding the bag--a bag of incriminating cat treats. "Apparently it is easier for some people to blame a dog than to solve a crime," sniffs the offended Ike in a letter to his vacationing owner. As in the first book, children can tease apart truth from exaggeration by interpolating among the letters, the color scenes of reality, and Ike's gumshoe fantasies, cleverly rendered in black and white. It turns out that the "daring escape" from police custody is really a casual leave-taking ("I'm sure he'll come back when he gets hungry," says the officer in charge); his nighttime investigations are conducted from the comfort of a posh hotel room. The noir-inspired premise drifts farther from doggy reality than the first book's, but children will get a thrill out of piecing together the mystery alongside the wily, self-serving, yet eminently lovable Ike. Jennifer Mattson
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
1
3 star
3
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 13 customer reviews
I recommend this book to anyone because it is funny and good.
Sara B. Richardson
In his Detective LaRue books, Mark Teague tells the story from multiple perspectives in both text and pictures.
My Two Cents
I love the Ike LaRue series, I have 3 of the books, and I really hope he writes more.
Sandra L. Flanagan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By LonestarReader VINE VOICE on September 28, 2004
Format: Hardcover
In Dear Mrs. LaRue: Letters from Obedience School, 2002, Ike the dog wrote plaintive letters describing his life "behind bars." He hopes his owner, Mrs. LaRue, will come to rescue him from obedience school. The wonderful humor came from the clever story and illustrations. The reader can compare colorful reality with Ike's black and white point of view.

In his new book Ike is writing letters to Mrs. LaRue again while she is on vacation in Europe. This time he is a suspect in the disappearance of the Hibbins cats. Feeling completely misjudged, Ike mails his owner pleas and updates from the police station where he has been taken into custody. Forced to flee and on the lam, he attempts to solve the mystery of the cats' disappearance as well as a series of canary burglaries. Once again the detailed illustrations and articles from the Snort City Register/Gazette hold the key to the story and the laughs. This book is a very entertaining sequel. This is a must-read for fans of Ike!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Sara B. Richardson on March 26, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I read this jail breaking book called Detective LaRue. Two cats ran away from their home and a dog named Ike gets blamed. There is a jumbo sized dilemma but I can't tell you. The police are working on another case so Ike takes it into his own hand, I mean paw. You have to read the rest to find out what happens.

I like this book because Ike dreams funny things like that he is in jail when he was with a nice police.

I recommend this book to anyone because it is funny and good.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. Blankenship HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on November 13, 2010
Format: Hardcover
If you are like me, after reading Dear Mrs. La Rue: Letters From Obedience School, where Ike LaRue , our manipulative dog friend keeps his owner, Mrs. LaRue informed of his trials and tribulations while being locked up in obedience school, you had to wonder what happened to this spoiled, bright, and tale telling dog after his return home.

Well in this sequel we find the immediate answer. Ike, the pampered pooch is accused in the disappearance of the two neighbor cats and is arrested as he is found in the local park with an empty bag of cat treats hanging from his mouth.

The author has used the same techniques that he used in his first book; actually a combination of techniques. First the have the most untruthful letters Ike writes to his owner as she is vacationing in Europe. These letters are half truths, full blown exaggerations, and all put Ike's unique "spin" on reality. This is coupled with color paintings along with black and white paintings. Now Ike, in his first letter to Mrs. LaRue tells her to ignore the color pictures as they are false and complete police propaganda to show him in a bad light...she should only judge him by the back and white pictures.

The author then gives us, on each page, Ike's letters, a color painting of reality and a black and white picture of Ike's spin and take as a contrast.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R. Mayflower on April 7, 2006
Format: Paperback
My children 6,5,and 3 love Pigsty, another Mark Teague story, and I love the illustrations. And the illustrations, and original story line are great in this book also, but as I read it to my children, I wondered: what age group is this written for? Sometimes I wonder if childrens publishers every bother reading these manuscripts to a child? By the time my daughter understands what "dire," "intrepid," and "apparent" mean, she will be beyond picture books. And these three words were on just one page. I love when books introduce new vocabulary to children, but I find that often publishers take it too far, and unfortunately, this is the case here.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on January 19, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Detective LaRue should have won the Caldecott award. It had a excellent storyline and perfect illustrations to match the mood. Why it lost to Kittens First Full Moon is quite a mystery to me. I would recommend it for ages 10-12.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By My Two Cents on April 15, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In his Detective LaRue books, Mark Teague tells the story from multiple perspectives in both text and pictures. Ike LaRue is the misunderstood dog who has to investigate the crime that landed him in jail, while others tell their story from an entirely different point of view. These books appear to be written for a 6-year-old, but they have word play that even a 10-year-old may not understand.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The Mark Teague series is perfect for kids. Plus, who doesn't love a naughty dog? We could not find the series in the book stores any longer and were so pleased to find it on Amazon.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?