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Developing E-Business Systems & Architectures: A Manager's Guide Paperback – December 19, 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann; 1st edition (December 19, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1558606653
  • ISBN-13: 978-1558606654
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7.4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,200,731 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Wow-I read the book on the plane last night-it's the book I've always wanted to write. You'll want to keep this book close at hand. It is an eminently readable dissertation on best practices, application architectures, and organizational metamorphoses that every e-business IT manager needs to know."
-Anne Thomas Manes, Director Business Strategy, Sun Microsystems

"A powerful yet easily understandable strategic blueprint for successful transition to e-business augmented with liberal examples showing the application of technology for business advantage. A must read for those tasked with managing the migration to e-business."
-Paul Allen, Principal Component Strategist, Computer Associates

"I was delighted to see a book that talks to the people who need to get us where we are going. Not overly technical and a healthy change from the overly generalized genre of business IT books published."
-Gregory Maciag, President and CEO, ACORD

"This is really a terrific book! In the current rush of books on e-commerce, the treatment is generally too high-level to be of any value, or too low-level to help manage the difficult transition from business to e-business. This book finally bridges the gap, with hands-on details for the manager who has to somehow transition 40 years worth of computing detritus supporting a bricks-and-mortar operation to an online business melding the walk-in customer with the surf-in customer. Congratulations to one and all."
-Richard Mark Soley, Ph.D., Chairman and CEO, Object Management Group, Inc.

"The software architectures that have evolved over the last decade to drive the Internet and the "knowledge economy" are truly complex-they are today's rocket science. The authors have produced a cogent, readable explanation of state-of-the-art thinking about modern e-business software: a useful framework for corporate decision makers. The book gives high-level perspectives and practical guidance for rethinking business processes and retooling applications development to support business in the modern, totally wired age. The inclusion of several case studies is particularly helpful."
-Avron Barr and Shirley Tessler, Stanford Computer Industry Project

From the Back Cover

"Wow-I read the book on the plane last night-it's the book I've always wanted to write. You'll want to keep this book close at hand. It is an eminently readable dissertation on best practices, application architectures, and organizational metamorphoses that every e-business IT manager needs to know."
Anne Thomas Manes, Director Business Strategy, Sun Microsystems

"A powerful yet easily understandable strategic blueprint for successful transition to e-business augmented with liberal examples showing the application of technology for business advantage. A must read for those tasked with managing the migration to e-business."
Paul Allen, Principal Component Strategist, Computer Associates

"I was delighted to see a book that talks to the people who need to get us where we are going. Not overly technical and a healthy change from the overly generalized genre of business IT books published."
Gregory Maciag, President and CEO, ACORD

"This is really a terrific book! In the current rush of books on e-commerce, the treatment is generally too high-level to be of any value, or too low-level to help manage the difficult transition from business to e-business. This book finally bridges the gap, with hands-on details for the manager who has to somehow transition 40 years worth of computing detritus supporting a bricks-and-mortar operation to an online business melding the walk-in customer with the surf-in customer. Congratulations to one and all."
Richard Mark Soley, Ph.D., Chairman and CEO, Object Management Group, Inc.

"The software architectures that have evolved over the last decade to drive the Internet and the "knowledge economy" are truly complex-they are today's rocket science. The authors have produced a cogent, readable explanation of state-of-the-art thinking about modern e-business software: a useful framework for corporate decision makers. The book gives high-level perspectives and practical guidance for rethinking business processes and retooling applications development to support business in the modern, totally wired age. The inclusion of several case studies is particularly helpful."
Avron Barr and Shirley Tessler, Stanford Computer Industry Project

Developing E-Business Systems & Architecturesis not another book on how the Internet is changing business or about the potential of e-commerce. The authors assume that their readers already understand these things. Rather, it is written for executives and managers of medium to large companies who are considering or are already engaged in transforming their companies into e-businesses, and especially for IT managers with responsibilities for designing and developing new corporate software systems.

This book provides managers with a road map to help them develop a strategic plan for their own transition. It also focuses on e-business architectures and software development practices that will need to change, and how the company itself must change to accommodate software development with components. Since all transformation depends upon people, there is also an emphasis on the reorganization of IT teams to support component-based development.

Features:
* Includes many case studies that the authors, all of whom have written best-selling books on e-business, have gathered from years of experience in implementing these systems.
* Focuses on the changes companies must make in their IT groups to support the development of e-business initiatives.
* Fully describes the enterprise component architecture framework for implementing e-business applications with an enterprise class infrastructure.

More About the Author

Education: Earlham College (Richmond Indiana) & Columbia University (NYC)
Spent adult life working as a management consultant.

Worked for Geary Rummler in NYC then started Harmon Associates in San Francisco. Wrote newsletters for Cutter Consortium in the 80s and 90s on Expert Systems and Artificial Intelligence, Object Oriented Technology and CASE. Co-founded Business Process Trends - www.bptrends.com - in 2003 and then joined with other to create the BPTrends Associates Methodology for organization and process change.

Have published a series of books on different software technologies that can be used to improve business performance.

Customer Reviews

2.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Curtis Hall on April 9, 2001
Format: Paperback
I bought this book based on the review by Mike Tarrani, read it and thought that Mike's comments were right on. Checking back, I noticed the unsigned review from Pittsburgh. It's one thing to say that a book doesn't meet your specific needs -- and Pittsburgh sounds like an architect wanting an in-depth treatment -- and another to dismiss it out of hand, as Pittsburgh does. This book is great for a manager who wants an introduction to the problems involved in developing e-business systems and planning for a transition. What Pittsburgh thinks are light weight chapters are, in fact, just the kind of overview I wanted. I've looked at other books and this one is the best for a business manager who is just trying to get a feel for how all the elements involved in moving to an Internet-based system need to work together.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Mike Tarrani HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on February 8, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The title of this book is misleading. If you are seeking a book about how to actually develop e-business systems I recommend Enterprise System Architectures or Realizing E-business with Components. However, if you are looking for a book that clearly explains what e-business really means then this book is a gem.
What this book is really about is how to develop an e-business strategy and how to restructure brick and mortar business processes to make the transition to e-business. These topics are often overlooked by those who are bent on jumping on the e-business bandwagon because their competitors are doing it. Therein lies the real value of this book. The approach to developing an e-business strategy will warm the hearts of MBAs who will feel right at home with the basis of the strategy: Micheal Porter's Model of Competition. Good treatment is also given to value propositions and how to effectively craft them in support of an e-business strategy. All in all, great stuff.
Strategy is followed by a realistic look at business process reengineering. Just when you thought Champy and Hammer were old news you see that BPR is very much alive and well in companies that have effectively made the transition to e-business.
The authors next take you on a whirlwind tour of the underlying technologies, and they do it well. MBAs and other management types will feel comfortable with this material. Even technical types will find this to be good reading (and I hope that technical staff will read this business-oriented book because there is much for them to learn from it).
Implementation of an e-business infrastructure and transitioning to it are covered pretty thoroughly considering how few pages are devoted to these subjects.
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By "rwalker@walsh.edu" on May 12, 2001
Format: Paperback
This E-Business "Manager's Guide" proved to be much more than the title promised. It would more aptly be subtitled a "CEO's, CFO's, COO's, CIO's, Strategic Planner's, and Manager's Guide". Following a chapter introducing the challenge at hand, the authors review the Competitive Strategy Model introduced in 1980 by Michael E. Porter of Harvard Business School. This Model - along with variants of the model - becomes a recurring point of reference throughout the book. While predictions are intentionally avoided, care is given to emphasize the difficulty of the several areas of organizational change that must be addressed. The rush to address the growing Internet economy has frequently been met with hastily created web pages, among other efforts to appear to be a part of the information age. The authors do insist that in order to survive upcoming economic changes, organizations must be able to not only change business practices, but also the entire strategic planning processes that form those practices. They look in detail at the many angles of this evident necessity.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Linda Zarate on April 8, 2001
Format: Paperback
I read this book to get up-to-speed in the systems and architectures that provide the underpinnings of e-business. I am neither an e-commerce specialist nor a systems architect, but felt the need to understand the basics. Until this book I searched in vain for one that could do a reasonable job of explaining such an encompassing and potentially complex subject.
What sets this book apart is its business focus and the fact that it was obviously written for managers who need to see the big picture without getting caught up in technical details.
The first four chapters focus strictly on the business issues and provide some good information about how to develop a workable e-business strategy. I like this because the author puts business imperatives and process before technology, which is as it should be.
Chapter 5 steps you through some of the major systems and subsystems that comprise an "e-business" system. Despite the technical nature, the author does not stray far from business issues. This, in my opinion, is big plus.
Architecture is covered thoroughly enough for a solid overview in chapters 6 and 7. I personally gained a good understanding of system architectures in general and e-business architecture considerations in particular. More importantly, although the author went into increasing levels of detain and delved into some areas in the deeper end of the technical pool, I was able to follow the material. This is a tribute to the clear writing, excellent use of illustrations, and the author's personal talent for explaining complex topics in an understandable manner.
The remainder of the book addressed the transition to e-business from business process and technical architecture points of view.
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