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Developing Java Beans Paperback – June 8, 1997

ISBN-13: 063-6920922896 ISBN-10: 1565922891 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1st edition (June 8, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1565922891
  • ISBN-13: 978-1565922891
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,655,714 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

O'Reilly books are rarely for neophytes, but advanced users swear by them, and these will be no exception. Englander covers a hot Java subtopic for students, programmers, and professionals already familar with Java and object-oriented programming. He discusses events, event adapters, properties, persistence, java archive files, the BeanBox tool, property editors, ActiveX, and the java.beans Package. Flanagan's work is the book Java programmers want nearby when they are at the keyboard. A complete ready-reference work, this belongs in all collections supporting programmers. Java is a constantly changing language so Nutshell will be coming out often with new editions; always have the newest one on hand. Reese goes beyond simple applet design to relational databases, SQL, object-oriented database applications, application servers, and remote object manipulation. The examples used throughout the book are based on a banking application designed in Java.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From the Publisher

Java Beans is probably the most important new development in Java this year. Beans is the next generation of Java technology that not only adds features the language lacked, but also lets Java programs interoperate with a number of development environments. The initial release includes a bridge for Microsoft's ActiveX/COM; future releases will include bridges for Netscape's LiveConnect and IBM's OpenDoc. Since it's a "component architecture" for Java, Beans can be used in graphical programming environments, like Borland's Latte or Symantec's Visual Cafe. This means that someone can use a graphical tool to connect a lot of beans together and make an application, without actually writing any Java code -- in fact, without doing any programming at all. Graphical development environments let you configure components by specifying aspects of their visual appearance (like the color or label of a button) in addition to the interactions between components (what happens when you click on a button or select a menu item). One important aspect of Java Beans is that components don't have to be visible. This sounds like a minor distinction, but it's very important: the invisible parts of an application are the parts that do the work. So, for example, in addition to manipulating graphical widgets, like checkboxes and menus, Beans allows you to develop and manipulate components that do database access, perform computations, and so on. You can build entire applications by connecting pre-built components, without writing any code. Developing Java Beans is for people who need to stay up-to-date with the latest developments in programming technology. Minimally, developing Beans means adopting several simple design patterns in your code. However, that's only the beginning. To take full advantage of the Java Beans architecture, you should understand how to write classes that are serializable, use events for communication between classes, know when and how to provide BeanInfo classes that give graphical environments more information about your components, and provide property editors and customizers that let graphical tools work with more complex Beans. The book covers: Events, event listeners, and adapters Properties, indexed properties, bound properties, constrained properties, and vetoable property changes Persistence, serialization, versioning, and object validation Packaging Beans using JAR files The BeanBox, a prototypical development tool Reflection and introspection Property editors and customizers The ActiveX bridge; using Java Beans in Visual Basic programs

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By mgart@netegrity.com on March 23, 1999
Format: Paperback
The writing is pretty good. Reading this book, a Java programmer can understand the Java Beans concepts. But the examples are extremely sloppy: full of errors, some don't compile, some exhibit incompetent Java threads programming concepts.
Corrected examples should be put on the Web site. This is the only O'Reilly book I've read that wasn't very good.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Cees van Barneveldt on January 11, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is not a good tutorial about Java Beans. In order to explain the Java Bean concept you have to start with the Java Beans specifications of Sun. This would answer question about which things are relevant and why they are relevant in JavaBeans development. Now the the reader almost jumps into a long winded explanation about events and adapters, wondering why this is relevant and what the writer wants to explain. To make matters worse: the example contains errors! Basically, after the first three chapters I was utterly confused.
This book also needs a clearer description about the use of Java Beans. In a next update we definitely need a chapter about how JavaBeans are used in Java Server Pages.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Almy on January 28, 2000
Format: Paperback
I bought this book to learn how to write Java Beans, after buying another book that was totally useless. This one did cover all I needed to know in a clear manner.
So why didn't I give it more stars? As others have mentioned, the examples are full of errors. However I also felt the examples were somewhat vacuous. They weren't really that good at explaining the concepts.
The final reason this book now collects dust is that my Java IDE does such a good job of automatically generating the Bean interface that I find the book unnecessary. Perhaps the book has been made obsolete by the advancement of technology?
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 8, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is titled "Developing Java Beans". It spends lots of time to talk about the detailed architecture of Event model and other important topics used in Beans. It is well written and easy to follow. However, may not be the good book for those poeple in a rush just want to how to write a Java Beans.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Joe B on June 1, 2003
Format: Paperback
I've been programming for 10 years, and I have 2 bookcases full of ORA and ADW books. I have to say that this is among the most confusing programming books I've seen.
I'm in the same position as the guy below who's confused after 3 chapters. The first couple of chapters of this book seem to be a tutorial about event handling, and applet creation. Applets? I have no idea where the author is going with this stuff. It's not that I don't understand the concept of event handling, it's just that this guy does not explain what the heck handlers and listeners have to do with beans. I'm sure they do, somehow...
Perhaps if the author provided an an explanation up front about where he's going with the code, I'd stick with the program. Even better, how about an overview of why beans are so great and useful, with some trivial examples. Then progress to the 'real world' stuff.
I'm dissapointed with this book because I need to learn about Beans... fast. 3 chapters of working bean code and good examples would have been enough for my instincts to kick in and take me the rest of the way. I don't have the time to search for answers, I thought that a $30.00 investment in an ORA book would have saved me hours of searching. Well, not this time.
If you can get the applets from chapters 1 and/or 2 working, please post how in this forum. You'd be doing a lot of folks a favor. Good luck figuring out if you should be compiling *.java.1 or *.java.2 examples.
That's enough about this one... Now I have to find a GOOD beans book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. West on March 20, 2000
Format: Paperback
I was disappointed with this book. Almost 300 pages, half are I found worthless. I have programmed in Swing and JDBC, I wanted to start getting into some Java Bean development. The first part of this book is too much of a review for anyone who has done any Java programming before (a review of the Java Event model). The example code is poor. Definitly a rush job.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 29, 1999
Format: Paperback
Very poor book. Lack of working examples and not much more information than is contained in the Beans specification. Mr. Englander pulled the wool over O'Reilly's eyes on this one.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Lily Wu on July 16, 2000
Format: Paperback
Comprehensive and thorough on topics covered. However, examples do not work and even with compilation errors. Nonetheless, the concept and JB feature in discussion is there.
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