Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Development and Social Change: A Global Perspective, 5th Edition (Sociology for a New Century)
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on March 11, 2015
A very straight forward book that does not waste time nor writing space to teach. Written in a very textbook style, McMichael still manages to fill the book with interesting examples and statistics to help readers understand the depth and real world consequences of the subjects he talks about.
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on August 30, 2012
Concise and clear, with many recent case studies. The first two chapters are a historical review of how development was created and implemented. The author mentions many economic writers from around the world. A comprehensive assessment, a multicultural evaluation of how the global community operates today, and what we could face in the near future.
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on November 29, 2014
I needed this book for a class for school, but I actually enjoyed it (and I'm sure a lot of you know how hard it is to like school textbooks). very clear and organized
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on May 15, 2016
Awful. Filled with absurd critiques of all things modern and globalized. The author cherry-picks examples out of context to support his arguments, and flat out ignores counter-evidence and theories that diverge from his own. Highlights include the largest misuse of economics in an "academic" book that you'll ever read, 300 pages of "it's the global North's fault that poverty exists", and a lackluster argument that the IMF and World Bank secretly just want to keep the poor in their place...If you're looking for a dumbed-down communist manifesto for the 21st century, you have found a winner.
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on September 2, 2015
The book us usable but has tons of highlighting, writing, and post-its.
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on August 18, 2015
Interesting content but not the best read. Came to me in great shape!
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on September 2, 2015
Helped very much to understand at the global perspective .
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on September 2, 2014
Heavily loaded presentation. Alarmist treatment of topics. Lopsided theoretical framework.
The chapters I read each had serious problems with liberal/radical/critical overstatement, and poor/misleading use of reference material.
For example, chapter 1 refers to a Wikipedia article which at the time of my reading had nothing to substantiate his simplistic claims about Congo's civil war. The textbox on Detroit is similarly overstated and simplistic. Sociology really needs an alternative book on this subject. This one doesn't cut it. It's completely dominated by critical perspectives. It also refers to "Gaia" mysticism as if it's a cutting-edge scientific subject. Puh-leez!!!
If you can ignore these huge faults and biases, purely as an overview of the critical perspectives on this topic, then the book is serviceable. Then go read a random economics textbook about economic development.
Recommended instead: The older but far superior book "Society, State, and Market" by John Martinussen.
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on March 3, 2016
Great book, great condition.
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on July 14, 2015
As expected.
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