Programming Books C Java PHP Python Learn more Browse Programming Books
Java EE 5 Development using GlassFish Application Server and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $49.99
  • Save: $5.00 (10%)
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by Super Sales 365
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Book is like new condition. Fulfilled and Delivered by Amazon. Eligible for *FREE* super saver shipping on products over $35. No highlighting or writing. Corners are in excellent shape. Artwork is bright. CD or access code comes with the book if required. Stored, Sold + Shipped by Amazon. Hassle free returns!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Java EE 5 Development using GlassFish Application Server: The complete guide to installing and configuring the GlassFish Application Server and ... 5 applications to be deployed to this server Paperback – October 11, 2007


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$44.99
$9.97 $0.88
Best%20Books%20of%202014
If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $2.99 (Save 84%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


Shop the New Digital Design Bookstore
Check out the Digital Design Bookstore, a new hub for photographers, art directors, illustrators, web developers, and other creative individuals to find highly rated and highly relevant career resources. Shop books on web development and graphic design, or check out blog posts by authors and thought-leaders in the design industry. Shop now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 424 pages
  • Publisher: Packt Publishing; 1st Ed. edition (October 11, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1847192602
  • ISBN-13: 978-1847192608
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 1 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,679,997 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

David Heffelfinger

David Heffelfinger is the Chief Technology Officer of Ensode Technology, LLC, a software consulting firm based in the greater Washington DC area. He has been architecting, designing and developing software professionally since 1995, he has been using Java as his primary programming language since 1996. He has worked on many large scale projects for several clients including the US Department of Homeland Security, Freddie Mac, Fannie Mae and the US Department of Defense. He has a Masters degree in Software Engineering from Southern Methodist University. David is editor in chief of Ensode.


More About the Author

David Heffelfinger is the Chief Technology Officer of Ensode Technology, LLC, a software consulting firm based in the greater Washington DC area. He has been architecting, designing and developing software professionally since 1995 and has been using Java as his primary programming language since 1996. He has worked on many large scale projects for several clients including the US Department of Homeland Security, Freddie Mac, Fannie Mae, and the US Department of Defense. He has a Masters degree in Software Engineering from Southern Methodist University.

Customer Reviews

I wouldn't recommend this book to anyone other than really early beginners.
Royce
The author does not assume that the reader is an advanced Java developer - but does expect that you have some familiarity with the language.
Kelvin Meeks
I wish the author would have covered this very important topic in more detail.
John Yeary

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By John Yeary on February 10, 2008
Format: Paperback
My overall opinion of the book is good. The book is very well written, and the code examples in the book work. Working code examples are the number one criteria for me. The code examples start with some examples in Chapter 2 that are used throughout the remainder of the book. This provides a coherent flow through the book. You may also download the code examples from the Packt Publishing support site.

I would recommend it as a book to have on your development bookshelf.

The book claims to be the complete guide to installing and configuring GlassFish. I would not give it that much credit. There is room for more extensive books on GlassFish. There are a number of topics that are very general and have nothing to do with the actual configuration of the server. A better book summary would be a guide to installing, configuring, and developing applications for the Glassfish server. It is really a Java EE 5 tutorial which features Glassfish.

As a book on GlassFish, it is very light in its coverage. As a tutorial for developers acquainting themselves with Java EE 5 and deployment on Glassfish it is very good. In my opinion it is targeted at developers familiar with J2EE who want to switch to JEE5, or junior developers trying to get a better comprehension of the EE environment. It is not for novice programmers.

Chapter 1

Getting Started with GlassFish

This chapter covers getting and installing GlassFish. It is very basic, but will get you up and running. It also includes how to set up your JNDI database connections. The majority of this information can be readily found on the GlassFish site on Java.net. There is a good example of how to set up multiple domains on GlassFish which is not easily gleaned from the site.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Anthony C. Mcclay on December 13, 2007
Format: Paperback
To get right to the issue, if you are new to Glassfish and Java EE than this book is for you. It does a great job of covering all the major topics of the J2EE Server, JPA, EJB 3.0, JMS, WebServices, and Security.

I was not too happy to see the Glassfish apptool used throughout the book, since that is not a part of the J2EE Standard toolset. Also the discussions of jsp, and the JavaServer Pages Standard Tag Library is overkill, and not used as much in preference for Java Server Faces, and AJAX related technology.

Where the book lacks is in detail hints, and configuration setup. Such as Glassfish Clustering, JMS Queue Management, Management, Monitoring, Logging or connecting to Load Balancers or Web Servers.

It is also hard to write a book on Glassfish without including Netbeans, which works so well with Glassfish services. I think the upcomming Netbeans 6.0 Book, should also be required to close the development circle to being productive with this tool set. The Pair of tools Netbeans 6.0 and Glassfish, is as powerful of a combination I have found. The best of the Opensource free development tools, because of the close tie to the Java Enterprise Edition Standard.

I think the Author and reviewers did a great job in presenting the information. It just seams like another book for detailed Glassfish Implementations should be created. The Sun Manuals are dry even by my Sun Certified Web/Bus/Service standards. They were not meant the explain why you need to set the options or why should you care about it, whereas books like this gives you a reason to care.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By W Boudville HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 18, 2008
Format: Paperback
I do have to agree with others who remarked that the book is not a comprehensive discussion of GlassFish. In this respect, it is somewhat of a downer. But, perhaps albeit inadvertantly, its best merit is elsewhere.

Over the years, the Java world has grown hugely from just the Java language. Roughly, the latter is more or less J2SE. But in the J2EE field, or what Sun seems to just be calling EE, many extra layers of code and packages have been added. Entire books have been written on each of the topics of servlets, Java Server Pages, Enterprise Java Beans, Java Server Faces, Java Messaging Service, JDBC, Web Services and Ajax. Where do you start, if you don't know any of these? One answer is right here. This book. Heffelfinger gives a concise overview of each topic. Enough technical details that a programmer can understand and appreciate. More to the point, you can see how these tie into each other.

Frankly, you'll still need those other books, to do serious coding in a given topic, or between topics. But the understanding and top level view here is valuable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By D. SALTER on December 11, 2007
Format: Paperback
The book assumes that the reader has experience of Java but no previous knowledge of Java EE or J2EE. As such, this is a great book for developers who are new to this arena.

The book starts with an overview of what GlassFish is, what its competitors are and why we should use GlassFish. The introduction continues to provide details of how to download, install and verify GlassFish and finishes by exploring some of the management tasks associated with GlassFish such as managing domains, creating connection pools and configuring datasources.

Several sections of the book cover web development, including chapters on Servlets, JSPs, the JSP standard tag library and JSF. These chapters take the reader from initial concepts "What is a servlet?" and gradually build up on their knowledge by describing how to build JSF applications.

Database connectivity is covered in the book, however this assumes that the reader has some experience of SQL. The book starts by covering JDBC and how this can be used from within Java EE applications, and continues to discuss the Java Persistence API (JPA). This includes details on how to configure entity relationships with JPA, such as one-to-one and many-to-many relationships. After details and examples on how to use JPA, the reader is shown how to integrate JSF and JPA.

Moving away from web development, the book describes the Java Message Service (JMS) and how queues and topics can be defined within GlassFish and then accessed via Java code. This is taken further in the section on enterprise beans where the book discusses Message Driven Beans and how they interact with the application server. This section on enterprise beans also includes details about session beans and discusses life cycles, transactions and security.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews