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Devil May Care [Original recording remastered]

Bob DoroughAudio CD
4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)


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Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
MP3 Music, 13 Songs, 2012 $5.99  
Audio CD, Import, Original recording remastered, 2007 $41.77  
Audio CD, Original recording remastered, 2000 --  
Vinyl --  

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (June 20, 2000)
  • Original Release Date: 1956
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered
  • Label: Bethlehem Records
  • ASIN: B00004TJ8K
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #499,194 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Old Devil Moon
2. It Could Happen To You
3. I Had The Craziest Dream
4. You're The Dangerous Type
5. Ow
6. Polka Dots And Moonbeams
7. Yardbird Suite
8. Baltimore Oriole
9. I Don't Mind
10. Devil May Care
11. Midnight Sun
12. Johnny One Note
13. Yardbird Suite (Alternate Take)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

This 1956 recording was Bob Dorough's debut, an introduction to one of the most unusual talents in jazz. He's a gifted songwriter and a fine pianist, but most of all, he's a unique lyricist and singer, rattling off hyperkinetic vocalese in an almost chirping, high-pitched voice that somehow retains hints of an Arkansas drawl and a conversational intimacy. He's as distinctive on Hoagy Carmichael's beautiful "Baltimore Oriole" as he is on the bop fanfares like Dizzy Gillespie's "Ow!" and Charlie Parker's "Yardbird Suite," with his own memorable lyrics. His boppish piano playing--with all the virtues of crisp articulation and an acute sense of time--is an oddly conventional complement to the vocals, and there are good contributions by Warren Fitzgerald on trumpet and Jack Hitchcock on vibes. Devil May Care's title tune has recently received fine covers by more conventional singers like Diana Krall and Claire Martin, but it's much more distinctive here. While Dorough has influenced generations of jazz singers, from Mose Allison to Kurt Elling, there's nothing quite like the original. --Stuart Broomer

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
(7)
4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still Fresh After All These Years February 25, 2001
Format:Audio CD
I must admit that even though I'm a 50's jazz enthusiast I knew nothing about Bob Dorough before picking up this CD. I did so because most of the other reissues on this label have been very good (Johnny Hartman, Zoot Sims, Betty Roche etc.). Dorough blew me away. He's fresh, inventive and "oh so real" in his own unique way. Pianist, songwriter (title track among others) and singer, Dorough's style is gritty and unpolished but totally cool. Dorough is at the other end of the jazz singer spectrum from the silky smooth crooners that were popular at the time. His somewhat high pitched but wildly flexible pipes make no attempt to mask a southern drawl and his concept of jazz singing is so different from people like Torme or Mark Murphy (but I love those guys too!). Anyway, I'm babbling because I just love this CD. Highly recommended but be advised that some mainstreamers would consider Dorough "offbeat" (and thank God, because they'd be right!).
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars As authentically hip as it gets. March 10, 2002
Format:Audio CD
Not only is this album one of the most influential recordings I've ever owned, but it remains fresh and vital with each new playing. Dorough put me on to lean yet lyric piano lines, wildly inventive arrangements, sophisticated melodic-harmonic material sung "in the vernacular" and, most of all, the value of a good melody complemented by strong lyrics. In fact, this album was my first exposure to many of the "standards" from the American Songbook--from swingers like "It Could Happen to You" to a ballad I still enjoy playing, "Polka Dots and Moonbeams." Dorough may be no Frank Sinatra, but he shares with the "Master Storyteller" a belief in the quality of the material. The point is not to use the songs as mere showcases for his unique musical personality but quite the opposite. His treatments, unorthodox though they may be, invariably end up serving the song, bringing the shape of the melody and straightforward poetry of the words into sharp and unforgettable clarity.
There's not a weak moment let alone a throwaway performance on the entire recording. Even when he takes an apparent side trip, emitting grating sounds ( "hide your heart from spring, don't let churchbells ring" on "It Could Happen to You"), he makes it all come around to the song's very essence. And don't let the "hard bopper" persona fool you. "Polka Dots and Moonbeams" is as intimate and strangely enchanting as it gets. His own tune, "You're the Dangerous Type of Girl," swings with such ease and joy it would make any femme fatale proud. His vocalese on "Yardbird Suite" evokes the soul of Bird far more convincingly than any similar attempts by Eddie Jefferson or John Hendricks. And he grooves Duke Ellington's "I Don't Mind" so infectiously (who else has ever bothered to do the tune?
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A favorite new discovery August 20, 2002
By A Customer
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
As the other reviewers note, Dorough's album is very quirky, and there's not a bad performance or song in the mix.
His improvisations and imitations are engaging. I was playing this in the car for a friend, and he said, "You just can't be sad when listening to this. It's not physically possible." Very true: the whole album is fun.
His voice is also recognizable a couple of generations: he was the voice behind many of the "Schoolhouse Rock" songs, so this album is at once familiar, and yet new and fresh. Best song on the album: "Johnny One Note."
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Devil may be on to something. January 31, 2006
Format:Audio CD
This album was one of the best investments I ever made as a teenager, and it remains fresh and vital with each new playing even today. Dorough put me on to lean yet lyric piano lines, wildly inventive arrangements, sophisticated melodic-harmonic material sung "in the vernacular" and, most of all, the value of a good melody complemented by strong lyrics. In fact, this album was my first exposure to many of the "standards" from the American Songbook--from swingers like "It Could Happen to You" to a ballad I still enjoy playing, "Polka Dots and Moonbeams." Dorough may be no Frank Sinatra, but he shares with the "Master Storyteller" a belief in the quality of the material. The point is not to use the songs as mere showcases for his unique musical personality but quite the opposite. His treatments, unorthodox though they may be, invariably end up serving the song, bringing the shape of the melody and straightforward poetry of the words into sharp and unforgettable clarity.

There's not a weak moment let alone a throwaway performance on the entire recording. Even when he takes an apparent side trip, emitting grating sounds ( "hide your heart from spring, don't let churchbells ring" on "It Could Happen to You"), he makes it all come around to the song's very essence. And don't let the "hard bopper" persona fool you. "Polka Dots and Moonbeams" is as intimate and strangely enchanting as it gets. His own tune, "You're the Dangerous Type of Girl," swings with such ease and joy it would make any femme fatale proud. His vocalese on "Yardbird Suite" evokes the soul of Bird more convincingly than similar attempts by Eddie Jefferson and John Hendricks. And he grooves Duke Ellington's "I Don't Mind" so infectiously (who else has ever bothered to do the tune?
Read more ›
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