Devotion + Doubt

March 11, 1997 | Format: MP3

$4.99
Also available in CD Format
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2:40
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4:32
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2:21
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3:09
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4:15
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1:55
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1:24
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2:46
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4:21

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: March 11, 1997
  • Release Date: March 11, 1997
  • Label: Geffen
  • Copyright: (C) 1997 UMG Recordings, Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 39:07
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000W1XFUY
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #23,327 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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See all 28 customer reviews
I love these songs, and you will, too.
Patty K.
It's the imagery that Buckner pieces together which builds the emotions throughout the songs.
jenglund@worldnet.att.net
If you enjoy honest and unique singer/songwriter style music, give this a shot.
singmebackhome

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By jenglund@worldnet.att.net on May 2, 1998
Format: Audio CD
Debut albums that come out of nowhere are impressive, but a worthy sophomore album can be even more exciting. In most instances, a performer gets geared up for years before making that first album, but the second one can prove to be a disappointment. Only a handful of artists have been able to convincingly improve on that crucial first release. Elvis Costello easily topped My Aim is True with the raging This Year's Model, The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan bettered his self-titled debut because it contained songs that he'd written instead of old blues and folk songs, and The Band was a better album than even the varied Music From Big Pink. But Richard Buckner, someone you've probably never heard of, has done a stunning job with his second release, Devotion + Doubt. I first saw Richard Buckner open for Son Volt, standing alone on the stage with an acoustic guitar and his soft, whispering voice. At first, I was not very excited to hear another earnest folkie and rarely am I impressed with opening acts. They're usually openers because they don't have the talent nor the acquired skill to headline their own shows. But I was very impressed with Buckner, not so much with where he was at the time, but I could tell he seemed to know what he was doing, and that he'd probably only get better. When a song that you've never heard stays with you from an opening act, as "Blue and Wonder" did with me, that shows that something is there. I bought Buckner's first album Bloomed. It was a strong collection of acoustic-folk-country music, but nothing that knocked me off my feet. "Blue and Wonder" is the strongest song of the collection, but "This is Where" and "Gauzy Dress in the Sun" were good songs as well. But a first listen to Devotion + Doubt was a stirring moment.Read more ›
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By TrappedinNC on October 3, 2003
Format: Audio CD
The first time I listened to this record, I felt deflated. Where was the power and anguish that makes Bloomed one of the best records I've ever heard? The songs flowed one into another and seemed more sketches and sighs than actual music. Obviously, judging from the 5 stars above, I didn't throw it away and move on to KC and the Sunshine Band. This is an album I know I'll be listening to decades from now. After multiple playings it opens like an orchid, revealing some of the most heart-wrenching, subtle and beautiful music I've ever heard. Of Buckner's big three releases (Bloomed, this and the brilliant Since), this is my favorite. It's the least accessible, but the most rewarding. Buckner succeeds here through his quiet moments, from the break in his voice in Lil Wallet Picture to the echoing guitar and mandolin interlude in Ed's Song that never fails to bring me to the verge of tears. Buckner is not as accomplished a guitarist as Elliott Smith (who shares Buckner's ability to write the kinds of songs that make you want to drive the car into a ditch), but he uses his skills to perfection, more as another voice than an instrument. In short, I'm obsessed. Buy this record. Buy Bloomed first so you get a feeling for him and then buy this. Buy them all. Sell the house and kids.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 6, 1998
Format: Audio CD
Richard Buckner's second album came my way by my boss, who played this album constantly for several days and then forgot about it. He'd seen Buckner in Chicago and was impressed, then bought the album ... and wasn't so impressed. I, on the other hand, felt as though I had read "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" again for the first time. I was hooked. After purchasing it, and giving it a good, and louder, listening to, I came to cherish it as no other album in recent years. It kind of fits into "alt country", though, if that's your genre of choice, better to try his first, and less daring, first album "Bloomed". But if what you're looking for is a daring and intelligent album, with rewarding lyrics that haunt you long after you hear the song, and melodies you could have sworn you heard in a distant memory, this is the album for you. I agree with the other reviewers that this is a "late night/early morning" album - it's am! bient, quiet, torturously maudlin - but like most sad sounds, it is haunting, beautiful and spiritually fulfilling as well. Rarely have I given such accolades for an album in entirety - but the force of this album relies on its listening as a whole, as a process, as chapters in a book. It was almost as if Raymond Carver had decided to enter the music business. Highly suggested, especially the incredibly brilliant "On Traveling" and "Song of 27", the closing numbers. Like a journal kept during a romantic heartbreak, its hard to begin, even harder to stop listening. I heard that this was Buckner's personal recording of the album, that the mass release edition had been confused, and this was released instead. Usually, I wouldn't believe such a statement, in this case, however, I do. Five stars is not enough.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By singmebackhome on January 6, 2003
Format: Audio CD
I like all the heavy hitters: Neil Young, Dylan, Springsteen, Joni, Beatles, Merle Haggard, Willie Nelson, etc. They've all made records that are in the canon of all-time classics. Desert Island Discs, whatever you want to call them...you have your own list.
This album, Devotion + Doubt, is in that class. This is no lie, no hyperbole, no puffing up some sorta half-deserving underdog record. This is the real deal.
I remember when I first heard this record, I was going over to a friend's house to write some songs. I walked into his house and put my guitar down, ready to get to work. My buddy was just getting in from work and said he'd be ready in a few minutes, but listen to this "new record I just got." He put in Devotion + Doubt.
From the first evocation of "Pull," I knew there would be no songwriting done that night. There was nothing I was capable of saying musically that day that could possibly approach the feeling and vibe I was getting right then and there; it was tangible, almost like I could reach out and touch it. Then "Lil Wallet Picture" and it my fate was sealed. Guitar goes back in the case, I mutter "you ain't comin' out for awhile." Buckner stopped me cold. Hallelujah! How often do you get hit by art like this? Not often enough....
Read up and down this amazon.com comment board, you'll see that I'm not alone. If you enjoy honest and unique singer/songwriter style music, give this a shot. I honestly claim it is one of the finest records of all time.
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