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Dial H Vol. 1: Into You (The New 52) Paperback – April 23, 2013


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Product Details

  • Series: Dial H
  • Paperback: 168 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics; First Edition edition (April 23, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401237754
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401237752
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 0.3 x 10.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #206,318 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

DC takes its most delightfully naïve Silver Age concept—a device that turns the operator into a new superhero each time he or she dials the letters H-E-R-O—and puts it in the hands of an auteur of dark fantasy, novelist China Miéville (Railsea, 2012). Miéville gives the dial to a hapless, out-of shape schlub, plunging him into battle in such darkly comic guises as Captain Lachrymose, Boy Chimney, and Iron Snail. Miéville also gives the dial a mysterious past that winds through not only the history of telephony but also into alternate universes and the depths of the abyss itself. Indeed, while he creates a cast of supporting heroes and enemies in the surrealist vein of Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol, the story comes most alive when the novelist is on comfortably weird ground, exploring the nebulous clues and dire nature of the object. Santalouco provides grim cityscapes and gritty characters for the opening chapters, while David Lapham plays counterpoint with a clean, bright style that serves the slightly lighter-hearted closing chapters well. --Jesse Karp

Review

Praise for Mieville's Dial H:

"Dial H is a terrific tale of an ordinary schlub raised to hero status by accident. It’s an old trope but, as detailed vividly by Mieville, Dial H is full of cleverness and narrative energy."—EW.com's Shelf Life

"Miéville, a mystery/horror novelist, brings raw energy and intelligence to Dial H and it's amazing just how refreshing and invigorating that is."—MTV.com

"Mieville and Burchielli have turned a strange concept into something even more wonderful in "Dial H." Don't pass it up..."—Comicbookresources.com

"Wild, crazy fun. Miéville's ideas are golden from the get-go, and we can only imagine how much zanier they're going to be as the series wears on."—Craveonline.com

"Although Dial H is shorter on visceral horror, it goes longer on comedy, resulting in one of the best of DC Comics’ uneven New 52 relaunches."—Wired.com

Customer Reviews

It doesn’t help that the main character, Nelse, is just too broadly written.
Sam Quixote
It's like a mash-up between characters one could find in The Tick and a Grant Morrison comic.
Anthony W Kocur
I really enjoyed this quite a bit and will definitely look for further volumes in the series.
Craig Larson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Slim Cat on April 30, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This collects issues 1-6 and the 0 issue of DC's New 52.

Nothing much happens in Littleville, CO, especially not to overweight unemployed Nelson Jent. Then on a night just like any other Nelson tries to chase down a friend to find him being beaten by a gang. Nelson's powers of reason do not work so he finds himself in a telephone both (the first sign something is not right) trying to dial for help but he instead dials himself into the help. Some super help at that. And then things get really weird.

Whoa. After reading this book I understood the fans excited to have China Mieville on a comic series. DC is pretty proud to hang their hat on that as well as his name is huge and above the title on the cover unlike any of the other New 52 series graphic novel collections I have seen. Even Geoff Johns and Grant Morrison have their names at the bottom. Mieville does bring a unique voice to this world and the characters that separates it vastly from other writers of the medium. It is quite a dense read that almost frustrated me in the first few issues and had me constantly turning back to see if I had misread or missed something. At about 3-4 issues in the madness of this book finally had sunk in on me and I began to comprehend what was happening. Or Mieville, for lack of a better phrase, learned to "dumb it down" so as not to lose the reader.

For the first five issues, the book follows the heroics of Nelson Jent; an obese, smoking, slightly middle aged, slowwitted, but good hearted protagonist (very against type for a mainstream comic) who finds himself with a powerful tool that can transform him into a wide and bizarre range of superheros.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Craig Larson VINE VOICE on April 30, 2013
Format: Paperback
This is a pretty complicated comic and writer China Mieville just sort of throws his audience in the deep end without much by way of explanation, piling weirdness on weirdness. Just about the point where I couldn't take it any more, things slowed down a bit, got just a bit less weird, and some explanation was proffered, at which point, I decided, "Hey, I kind of like this!" The closest comparison I have is to the series Xombi, which had a couple of short-lived runs under the DC mantle, and was similarly weird and similarly short on explanations for its weirdness--and I loved that title. Basically, the story follows a young, out-of-shape guy who stumbles across an H-Dial (basically the dial off an old rotary telephone), which, when a certain number is dialed, grants the user the temporary use of the powers of some random superhero. Some of the heroes that make appearances include: Kid Chimney, the Iron Snail, Captain Lachrymose, and Bumper Carla. Nelson, our main character, decides to use these powers to help out a friend of his, in debt to a local hood, and inadvertently stumbles onto something much larger than the local criminal underground. The book is very strange and, at times, quite funny, with a standalone issue that flashes back to the ancient world to show us that these dials have been present in one form or another throughout history (in this case, it's basically a giant stone sundial). I really enjoyed this quite a bit and will definitely look for further volumes in the series. **ARC provided by Net Galley.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John Platt on July 22, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Dial H contains more ideas per panel than most comics have in an entire issue. The problem, though, is the panel-to-panel transitions. The storytelling here is rather muddy and convoluted. The story doesn't flow and the dialog feels choppy. I have also read the issues that follow this collection and things improve dramatically, so the weaknesses may lie more on the shoulders of the artist, who is good, but maybe not good enough quite yet.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy on May 1, 2013
Format: Paperback
When DC first rebooted it's entire line I was interested and read a good deal of the books. As titles came and went this is one I looked into and is currently the only book I still get from the ten to twelve or so I was first interested in. It's remarkably interesting, smart, and often hilarious. I hope DC is in for the long haul with Dial H because I know that I am.
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Format: Paperback
Nelson Jent is an out-of-shape, unemployed schlub who discovers a mysterious phone booth with a rotary dial in an alley near his flat. When he dials a specific number – H-E-R-O (the letters are underneath the numbers) – he transforms into… well, any number of random whacky “superheroes” for a short time before reverting back to his normal self! With his new powers he’s going to get revenge on the bad guys who killed his buddy.

Dial H isn’t a very good comic but I didn’t hate it. One of my issues with DC’s New 52 has been a lack of variety in the cast and if there’s one thing Dial H has plenty to spare, it’s variety. I liked the gothic Boy Chimney, the ultimate emo Captain Lachrymose, the utterly brilliant Iron Snail, and Tugboat – a dude with tugboats for hands! Those are great characters – it’s just a shame they were poorly written so the only memorable thing about them were their appearances.

The Brian Bolland covers are amazing and I liked the David Lapham-drawn issue where casual racism in older comics is addressed after Nelse transforms into Chief Mighty Arrow, who looks and sounds heap big exactly as you’d expect (also I would’ve loved to have seen David Lapham script a New 52 book – missed a trick, DC, unless he turned you down).

China Mieville is also an award-winning sci-fi novelist whose stories are set in, and are about, the modern urban environment, which is where this comic takes place – the dingy, forgotten parts of cities – so it seems like a good fit. But here’s the thing I’ve noticed: novelists do not make good comics writers (and vice versa – I dare you to try and read some of Alan Moore’s prose!) with very rare exceptions – arguably Neil Gaiman is the best example of this though Warren Ellis’ novels are pretty good too.
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Dial H Vol. 1: Into You (The New 52)
This item: Dial H Vol. 1: Into You (The New 52)
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