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Dialogues With the Devil Hardcover – June, 1967


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Hardcover, June, 1967
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 198 pages
  • Publisher: Doubleday; 1st edition (June 1967)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385045735
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385045735
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,182,593 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
82%
4 star
15%
3 star
0%
2 star
3%
1 star
0%
See all 33 customer reviews
Not a long book, nor is it casual reading.
Jacob Cartwright
I read this book 35 years ago and I've been searching for it for several years.
Kate
Most people have their own ideas about good and evil, God and the Devil.
D. Carter

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

63 of 64 people found the following review helpful By David Rasquinha on October 20, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This is one of those books where the author is almost incidental; the protagonists (Michael and Lucifer) have taken over the book completely. I thought when I began the book that this was just another cute idea, but soon found myself lost in the power of the debate within the first few pages. This is an unsettling book. It manages to challenge just about every idea and comes up with some real insights. For instance the genuine love of Lucifer for the Creator! Not at all what one would expect from scriptures! The fatal antagonism springs from Lucifer's near indignation over the imperfections of humankind, which in his distorted perception are an affront to the Creator and his works, and hence must be wiped out. Mercy has no place in Lucifer's Weltanschaung; a jealous pride dominates all other emotions. Yet he is not a figure of evil per se; his motivation is to vindicate himself before the Creator, and to that end he is prepared to lay waste to all. By contrast Michael, despite the classical illustrations of a stern visage with a flaming sword, is painted as a personage of deep empathy, rather than vengeance. Each time I have re-read this book it has left me shaken and humbled, and I have learned new insights each time. When first published this book must have raised a storm. Today, it is still a prize, even though many of its gender and other stereotypes, now outdated, can be annoying at times. Try to read it in the context of its times. Also the Judeo-Christian theological context makes for a restricted readership. For all that however, this has a firm place on my shelf of favorites. Well worth a try.
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30 of 30 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 29, 2000
Format: Hardcover
First published in 1967, it's a moving piece of work. Lucifer is presented in the old Hebrew/Christian tradition ... not totally fallen ... not beyond redemption until he tempts mankind into complete destruction. The book is a series of letters between Michael the Arch Angel, and his brother. They each present humanity's case from their respective points of view ... Lucifer's as God's great mistake, giving us immortal souls ... Michael is our defender. It is well worth the read. And make sure you check out the prologue.
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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Beverly DeForde on March 18, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This book is very topical today. The world is in a state of chaos that this book describes all too well. Janet sees through other eyes, as always and keeps your interest until the last word. St. Michael can nearly make you pity poor Luciel, but in the final analysis, it is God's will being done. I have read it many times and will read it many more times. I believe anyone would benefit from reading it. I am thankful that there have been writers like Janet Taylor Caldwell. She has never written a bad book. Now all I am looking for is a hardbound copy. My old paperback is falling apart!
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By K. Leal on January 8, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I would like to give this book more of a "4.5 stars" rather than flat 4, only for a little bit of slowness midway through the novel. Really 'Dialogues With The Devil' was supremely intriguing and thought-provoking and can rather knock the reader back at first. The author is well-disguised under the personas of Lucifer and Michael, with both archangels offering up their own ideas of humanity and the reasons for its downfall.
One of the most interesting ideas Caldwell explores is the idea of multiple races in the universe. Even though there is the distinct Christian influence (even though the author says herself he never thought of herself as especially religious) there is a nice bit of science fiction thrown in that takes this novel out of the realm of strict religious fiction. In the realm of Caldwell's Lucifer and Michael, God has created not just one but thousands of 'earths' and placed different types of humans on each one, subjecting all to tests similar in nature to the garden of Eden from the bible. Lucifer is also taken from a more...agreeable...perspective than most religious writing. His fall in this novel resulted from Lucifer's rejection of humans rather than hatred or jealousy of God. So Lucifer still loves God and the other angels; this entire book is a giant conversation between Michael and Lucifer, who refer to each other as brothers.
Overall I found it very interesting and unique, and the ideas presented to be worth thinking over long after the book is finished.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Rob Shamas on February 15, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book gives flavour to one of the greatest stories ever told in human history. The fall from heaven and grace is portrayed not onely as romantic and violent, but political as well. This book details the arguments for therebellion in such clarity and passion that one cannot help but be moved. For anyone who is interested in this story, I would recomend the screwtape letters. There is also an amazing muslim rendition of the story of the fall in a qaurterly magizine called "banned poetry"
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 2, 1999
Format: Hardcover
What *is* human nature ? The format of this book is reminiscent of the "Screwtape Letters" by CS Lewis, but it's much better. With each letter (chapter) you read your opinions about the nature of Man will sway by the lure of good argument. The result of this is that by the end of the book you've had to think through each of their points and ultimately come to your *own* conclusion about what is inherent in us and what is learned. You do NOT have to be a christian to read this book! I am not and it is one of me very favorite books. Though I have never read anything else by Taylor Caldwell (as I understand it it's all much different), I hold a high degree of respect for the author by the sheer brilliance of this one book.
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