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The Diamond in the Window (The Hall Family Chronicles) Paperback – Box set, December 18, 2001


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 820L (What's this?)
  • Series: Hall Family Chronicles (Book 1)
  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: HarperColl (December 18, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0064400425
  • ISBN-13: 978-0064400428
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 5.2 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (59 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #861,794 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jane Langton studied astronomy at Wellesley College and the University of Michigan and did graduate work in art history at the University of Michigan and Radcliffe College. Ms. Langton is the author of a dozen books for young people, including seven other fantasies about the Hall family of Concord, Massachusetts: The Diamond in the Window, The Swing in the Summerhouse, The Astonishing Stereoscope, the Newbery Honor Book The Fledgling, The Fragile Flag, The Time Bike, and The Mysterious Circus. Also well known for her mystery novels for adults, Ms. Langton lives in Lincoln, Massachusetts.

Customer Reviews

Since that time I have read this book to my children.
MusicLover
I loved this book as a child and have read it to my children...they love it too.
litlartwrk@aol.com
A wonderful story, intriguing mystery, lovable characters, perfect!
S. L. Hodge

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

79 of 80 people found the following review helpful By Linda J. Barrett on May 5, 2001
Format: Paperback
A couple of months ago, my 28 year old son Christopher called me and asked about some long forgotten books of his. He is mentoring some young children who are not book lovers and thought that some of his most beloved books could change their minds about reading. I pulled the box filled with his childhood treasures down from the top shelf of his old closet. Insided, I found not only rusting Hot Wheels and baseball cards, but the book, "Diamond In The Window". I caught my breath, for suddenly I was again a young mother reading to her 9 year old son. I admit to having forgotten about this story through the intervening years, but the moment I looked at the cover, the images came flooding back. Not only did the images come back, but I was immediately compelled to read this book once again. Even after a span of nearly 20 years, between the first time I read this book to now, I can honestly say that this is one of the best children's stories I have ever read. The story revolves around a brother and sister who discover a riddle that mysteriously appears in the attic window of their home. The riddle leads them to another dimension and some long...and very lost relatives. It is up to the children to solve the ever evolving riddle that will bring their relatives back to the present...and in the process, save the entire family from ruin and disgrace.Well, I contacted my son and told him about my "discovery" and mailed him the book. He called the other day to let me know that the book had worked the miracle he was after. After he received it, he began each Saturday morning by reading a portion of the story to the children he mentors.Read more ›
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Ivy on September 1, 2000
Format: Paperback
The Diamond in the Window is the start of Jane Langton's Concord series (for children, unlike much of her writing). It is, without question, one of the true classics of children's literature, fit to stand next to E. Nesbit, Edward Eager, and J.K. Rowling.
In The Diamond in the Window, Eleanor and Edward discover a boarded up room in their attic - and with it, a family mystery. Their Uncle Ned and Aunt Nora disappeared, years ago, from that attic room, and a few days later, so did a houseguest. While investigating the disappearances, they find a poem written on the stained glass window of the attic, which leads them to adventure and treasure.
One of Langton's great strengths is the amount of adult references she can pack into a book without alienating her child audience. Diamond is full of Transcendentalism and the history of Concord, but the information is presented in a way that makes it accessible to readers of all ages. This is an ideal book for reading aloud to an older kid (6 - 10) - sure to promote discussion, and able to hold interest for both adults and children.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 3, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book had a lasting effect on me when I read it 30 years ago. I especially liked the backwards names that Eddy kept doing. I have my name backwards on my license plate because of this book. I learned more about Thoreau and Emerson in this book than anywhere else in my readings. I recommend this to voracious readers of any age.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 30, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A watershed event occured for me this weekend when my daughter asked about this book as I put it securely in a place of honor on a new bookshelf. I was lucky enough to find an older hardbound last year with the classic 'orange' cover. I explained the story in general and told her she could read this copy, just take very good care of it. She has begun to read the book and I am almost envious as she discovers the mystery of the riddle. I recall the summer that I had the good fortune to check this out from the library for the summer reading club. I clearly remember reading it in my back yard on the evening of the summer solstice. Every time I read the poem etched in the window, I still get shivers... 'transcendental treasures, which of them is best?' The whole series! My collection of the Hall books is near complete, with only "The Fledgling" to be added. Jane Langton, you are much loved by this reader's family! OUT KNAHT!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Judy Kasey Houlette on December 27, 2000
Format: Paperback
As a child, I checked this book out of my neighborhood library time after time. When in my twenties, I was determined to find the book again. Though I'd forgotten the exact title and author's name, I returned to that same library, found the librarian I remembered from my childhood, and she recalled the title and author. Now, at the ripe old age of 43, I read "The Diamond in the Window" at least once every year, have given copies as gifts and will continue to read this favorite as long as I'm able. I also had the honor of meeting the author and having her autograph a copy for my daughter, who also loves the book.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By R. M. Fisher TOP 1000 REVIEWER on February 5, 2004
Format: Paperback
Much of Jane Langton's classic Hall Family Chronicles is based on her obvious love for Concord, Massachusetts and its rich literary heritage and historical importance; in particular Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thereau and Louisa May Alcott, all of whom appear in "The Diamond in the Window" in one way or another. Langton was seemingly so greatly inspired by them, it may be a good idea if children reading this book are given a short introduction to exactly who these people are beforehand, to save them being rather puzzled as to who the philosopher, the naturalist and the author actually are.
Edward and Eleanor Hall live in a strange old house with their aunt Lily and their somewhat crazy uncle Freddy, all of whom are put under threat by the grumpy Mr Preek the bank manager, who promises to evict them should Lily not be able to pay her proper dues in time. Meanwhile, the children discover a secret room with a key-hole window at the very top of the house that seems to be just waiting for two children. As it turns out, the room once belonged to children their ages - Nora and Ned, who disappeared into thin air many years ago. Along with the children was Prince Krishna of India, who had stayed with the family and was very great friends with the children and the fiancee of aunt Lily. After Ned and Nora disappeared however, it was only a matter of days before he too was gone.
Beguiled by this strange adventure, Edward and Eleanor decide to investigate further, especially into the part of the story that told of Krishna lavishing expensive gifts upon the children - if they can find the treasure, they can save their home!
Read more ›
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Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

I've written an awful lot of books. There are eleven for middle-aged children, mostly fantasies. The ones that have hung around the longest are "The Diamond in the Window" and "The Fledgling." The seventh in the series called "The Hall Family Chronicles" came out last spring, "The Mysterious Circus," and I've just finished writing an eighth, "The Dragon Tree."

All eighteen mysteries for adults have the same protagonists, Homer and Mary Kelly. Mary is the sensible one, but I confess I like Homer's rhapsodic flights of fancy. Most of their adventures happen in Massachusetts, but I've also sent them to farflung places I wanted to visit myself, like Florence, Oxford and Venice. Most of the novels are illustrated with my own drawings, but "The Escher Twist" has ten prints by the mysterious Dutch artist M. C. Escher, and the two historical mysteries are illustrated with nineteenth-century photographs.

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