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Toward the end of his life, Russell H. Conwell (1843-1925) observed, "I am astonished that so many people should care to hear this story over again. Indeed, this lecture has become a study in psychology; it often breaks all rules of oratory, departs from the precepts of rhetoric, and yet remains the most popular of any lecture I have delivered in the fifty-seven years of my public life. I have sometimes studied for a year upon a lecture and made careful research, and then presented the lecture just once -- never delivered it again. I put too much work on it. But this had no work on it -- thrown together perfectly at random, spoken offhand without any special preparation, and it succeeds when the thing we study, work over, adjust to a plan, is an entire failure." He then went on to explain to each audience that "acres of diamonds are to be found in this city, and you are to find them. Many have found them. And what man has done, man can do. [They are] are not in far-away mountains or in distant seas; they are in your own back yard if you will but dig for them." These comments provide an excellent introduction to Conwell's book. As I read it, I thought about Dorothy in L. Frank Baum's The Wizard of Oz. Only after a series of adventures far from Kansas did she realize that "there's no place like home." What Conwell has in mind involves far more than such appreciation, however. The tale he shares in this book, concerning a wealthy Persian named Ali Hafed, demonstrates that almost everything we may seek elsewhere is already in our lives and available to us.
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on June 20, 2002
Whoever said that great things come in small packages, must have had this book in mind. Conwell tells the story of a man who looked for diamonds and travelled the whole world to find them. After years of searching he came back home empty handed. His wife remarried and he was destitute. By accident one day he found the diamonds in his own backyard. The moral is obvious: Examine all the evidence to find truth. Most of the time its right under your nose. Although conwell uses this story to illustrate some matters of business, the message can be applied to anything. The smartest people in the world use the principles in this book whether they know it or not. The smart and succesful are usually in the minority and probably always will be. Others may not grasp the genius in this book, but the principles of success are here.
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on May 19, 2002
This book is small, eloquent, and easy to understand. It is about life, success, money, and priorities, what these things are and aren't, and will continue to challenge the way most of us choose to live our lives for years. Read this one instead of "Who Moved My Cheese."
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on February 1, 2001
As a child my father gave me this book to read and I didn't quite understand it all. 15 years later I pulled it out and decided to read it again. I'm so glad I did. My copy is battered, so I'm buying a new one to have to give to my children in the future. This book is incredibly inspirational while remaining logical and lighthearted. An excellent book for a young adult who is on the verge of having to make lifelong decisions. Short and simple to read.
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on October 5, 2003
Acres of Diamonds is a lecture that Russell Conwell, founder of Temple University, delivered more than 6,000 times across the country. Through this lecture, Conwell debunks the idea that it is noble to be poor, an idea that far too many Christians share. He illustrates that it is our duty as Christians to use our gifts to honestly earn riches, because you can do more good with riches than without.
Conwell successfully illustrates the difference between the popular expression "money is the root of all evil" and the complete Biblical passage which states "the love of money is the root of all evil". The love of money is idolatry, but money itself is neither good nor evil. It is simply a tool which may be used for either good or evil.
In these pages we learn the virtues of earning money through honest, hard work. We learn to look for opportunities to serve others in our own back yard by simply finding a need and filling it. If you wish to be great, begin with who you are right now, where you are right now. Follow these principles, and you will uncover your own acres of diamonds.
Larry Hehn, Author of Get the Prize: Nine Keys for a Life of Victory
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on February 12, 2000
A simple story, yet within is one of the most inspirational messages on achievement - that everything one needs for success is probably right in their vicinity, and all one has to do is to recognise it. Someone once stated that people learn more through a story than from a lecture or cold hard information - here is proof of the validity of that statement.
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on February 19, 1999
Really enjoyed this little gem. Abe Lincoln's success formula and others are filled with common sense tactics to leading a rich life. Looking forward to using some of these pearls and passing this book on to those I care about.
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on August 2, 1999
I loved the book and looked forward to hearing the tape--it's the kind of book you can gain fresh insights from each time you read it.
But the audiobook, specifically Billy Nash's narration, is so hokey and overdramatic that the effect is spoiled. Stick with the book!
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on August 1, 2013
This product is a poor rendition of the speech given by Russell Conwell in a printing filled with errors of all kinds. It appears to be a "second" and has no introduction or any other elements found in other versions of this fine story. Look around; I found copies of the "full" version of the book in paperback at half the cost of this disaster of a product. Amazon should take it off the market.
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on September 4, 1998
So much business wisdom in so little space. There are a number of short stories in this book, which will give anyone reading them excellent business advice. A lot these ideas are now being rediscovered by modern management.This book is also the seminal book for many of our modern "How to" succeed in business books. Mr Conwell's personal story is also extremely interesting and of merit. The funds from the lectures on which this book is based were used to found Temple University in Philadelphia. .
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