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Diaper Free: The Gentle Wisdom of Natural Infant Hygiene Paperback – Bargain Price, August 29, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Plume (August 29, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0452287774
  • ASIN: B000NJMMQS
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (62 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,113,456 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"...bolstered by Bauer's exhaustive research... Success stories and detailed practical advice make it seem possible. An interesting read." -- Susan Spicer, Today's Parent, Pregnancy and Birth Special Edition, Fall 2001

"I highly recommend this warm enjoyable book, packed with information, examples and support to any pregnant woman or new mother" -- Teresa Pitman, co-author of "Pregancy and Birth: The Best Evidence" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover

"The true solution to the diaper dilemma. . . . Packed with information, examples, and support. A valuable addition to the library of any pregnant or new mother."
—Teresa Pitman, La Leche League International --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Its a really good book with a lot of interesting information.
BlueChica
Jam packed with information and pictures, this book can help you and your baby go diaperless, or at the very least communicate better.
Suzanne E. Dillinger
Ingrid Bauer does a wonderful job of painting a picture of what it's like to go diaper free with a baby.
Lisa

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

113 of 117 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Sarah J. Buckley on June 20, 2007
Format: Paperback
As a family physician, writer on pregnancy, birth and parenting; and mother of four (my last baby raised 'diaper-free'), I found this book practical as well as inspiring.
I know it can be hard to believe that babies can be raised without diapers (and it is certainly not what I was taught at medical school), but after seeing it with my own eyes, I know that babies really do have the innate ability to communicate their elimination needs.
I also know that it is a gentle and baby-centered approach that enhances and deepens the relationship between mother and baby, and does not involved training, coercion, or distraction from normal activities such as play and learning.
As a mother and MD, I believe that this method (which is also how most babies around the world are raised) is healthier and more hygienic than putting babies in what has been called a `walking toilet', not to mention the financial benefits for the family and environmental benefits for the Earth.
I would highly recommend this book and this method, with the proviso that it requires a lot of physical closeness and also dedication from at least one carer. (In traditional cultures, the grandmother may be the main person to do this) I think this is especially true in our culture because we are usually parenting in isolation and don't have this method as part of our parenting lore.
For these reasons, it is probably easier for those who use (or plan to use) attachment parenting approaches which emphasize closeness and parental responsiveness such as baby wearing, co-sleeping and breastfeeding.
If you are interested in this style of parenting, you will particularly enjoy the gentle philosophy in this book, and Ingrid's sharing of her own experiences.
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70 of 73 people found the following review helpful By cellarstella on January 12, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My mom alerted me to the phenomenon of raising babies without diapers, and before deciding she was crazy, I ventured on some research into the subject. After having quickly read through this book, I thought to myself, "I bought a book on this?" It's a good book, it's just very... common sense. Ingrid Bauer explains how she came to the conclusion that she didn't want her baby stuck in diapers in such a way you'd think that any mother would come to the same conclusion. Of course, they don't, because we live in a diaper culture. We just don't see it much in the US, but it is actually widely practiced throughout the world. I plan to start with diapers, practice the "Natural Infant Hygiene" Ms Bauer recommends, and see what happens. Her philosophy is that kids naturally know when they are going to eliminate, and they'd rather communicate to you that they have to go than go in their diapers and wait uncomfortably for you to get them a clean one. She also hypothesizes that babies will forget how to control their elimination if you don't start communicating with them earlier on than 2 years, when most parents potty train their kids. Thus, they have to learn it all over again and it's a big pain that can be embarrassing for both of you.

Even if you aren't home with your kid 24 hours a day, it's still possible to use the techniques when you are around. It's not an all-or-nothing solution. You can diaper part of the time, and communicate with your child about eliminating when you are around. One cool thing is that most kids who have learned to control their elimination from birth have very little trouble with bed-wetting. 10% of 10 year olds still have bed-wetting episodes! That means 10% of 10 year olds are self conscious about and not fully in control of their elimination.
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50 of 55 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca Allen on March 22, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
But this is nevertheless a worthwhile read. Bauer is definitely the crunchiest of the three authors of early-potty-training/elimination communicating books. Boucke has more cross-cultural information. While I have not yet read Sonna, it looks like she has the most historical/research based information.

Bauer spends a lot of time describing ways to increase the bond between mother (parent, caregiver . . .) and baby, including, obviously, natural infant hygiene/elimination communication, but also including baby wearing next to the skin and, in general, lots of skin to skin contact. She is, in her own quirky way, an inspiring mother.
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58 of 66 people found the following review helpful By Nathan Rawling on January 28, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My wife and I bought this book, which was recommended to us by a friend who has successfully used Natural Infant Hygiene with their child. I finished reading it the other day, and my wife and I are talking about trying it.

Perhaps others have had different impressions after reading the book, but I think that only about 10-20% of the total text was actually helpful. The rest seemed more like marketing material. Over half the book is more focused on why you should practice Natural Infant Hygiene rather than how to actually do so.

I'm not sure I would buy it again.
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43 of 48 people found the following review helpful By K. Scott on October 12, 2002
Format: Paperback
I can't recommend this book highly enough... any loving parent wanting to increase the communication between themselves and their child should buy this book. But be warned, you'll end up lending it out to all of your friends, so maybe you should buy two! :-)
Ingrid's own experiences helped encourage me to try this with our own son, with astounding success... our son is out of diapers, but more importantly we are continually communicating about his needs and providing response to his inborn instinct not to soil himself. This is a great gift for an expectant mom, as Natural Infant Hygiene is best approached with an infant, although older babies and their parents can adapt the principles. A treasured book on my parenting shelf.
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