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Diaper Free: The Gentle Wisdom of Natural Infant Hygiene Paperback – Bargain Price, August 29, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Plume (August 29, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0452287774
  • ASIN: B000NJMMQS
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (66 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,709,980 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"...bolstered by Bauer's exhaustive research... Success stories and detailed practical advice make it seem possible. An interesting read." -- Susan Spicer, Today's Parent, Pregnancy and Birth Special Edition, Fall 2001

"I highly recommend this warm enjoyable book, packed with information, examples and support to any pregnant woman or new mother" -- Teresa Pitman, co-author of "Pregancy and Birth: The Best Evidence" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover

"The true solution to the diaper dilemma. . . . Packed with information, examples, and support. A valuable addition to the library of any pregnant or new mother."
—Teresa Pitman, La Leche League International --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Still, it's a great book, I gave it 5 stars.
Irit Levhar Gabay
I work in a daycare and parents are constantly asking me about how I got my baby to use a potty so early!
cellarstella
Its a really good book with a lot of interesting information.
BlueChica

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

118 of 122 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Sarah J. Buckley on June 20, 2007
Format: Paperback
As a family physician, writer on pregnancy, birth and parenting; and mother of four (my last baby raised 'diaper-free'), I found this book practical as well as inspiring.
I know it can be hard to believe that babies can be raised without diapers (and it is certainly not what I was taught at medical school), but after seeing it with my own eyes, I know that babies really do have the innate ability to communicate their elimination needs.
I also know that it is a gentle and baby-centered approach that enhances and deepens the relationship between mother and baby, and does not involved training, coercion, or distraction from normal activities such as play and learning.
As a mother and MD, I believe that this method (which is also how most babies around the world are raised) is healthier and more hygienic than putting babies in what has been called a `walking toilet', not to mention the financial benefits for the family and environmental benefits for the Earth.
I would highly recommend this book and this method, with the proviso that it requires a lot of physical closeness and also dedication from at least one carer. (In traditional cultures, the grandmother may be the main person to do this) I think this is especially true in our culture because we are usually parenting in isolation and don't have this method as part of our parenting lore.
For these reasons, it is probably easier for those who use (or plan to use) attachment parenting approaches which emphasize closeness and parental responsiveness such as baby wearing, co-sleeping and breastfeeding.
If you are interested in this style of parenting, you will particularly enjoy the gentle philosophy in this book, and Ingrid's sharing of her own experiences.
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72 of 75 people found the following review helpful By cellarstella on January 12, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My mom alerted me to the phenomenon of raising babies without diapers, and before deciding she was crazy, I ventured on some research into the subject. After having quickly read through this book, I thought to myself, "I bought a book on this?" It's a good book, it's just very... common sense. Ingrid Bauer explains how she came to the conclusion that she didn't want her baby stuck in diapers in such a way you'd think that any mother would come to the same conclusion. Of course, they don't, because we live in a diaper culture. We just don't see it much in the US, but it is actually widely practiced throughout the world. I plan to start with diapers, practice the "Natural Infant Hygiene" Ms Bauer recommends, and see what happens. Her philosophy is that kids naturally know when they are going to eliminate, and they'd rather communicate to you that they have to go than go in their diapers and wait uncomfortably for you to get them a clean one. She also hypothesizes that babies will forget how to control their elimination if you don't start communicating with them earlier on than 2 years, when most parents potty train their kids. Thus, they have to learn it all over again and it's a big pain that can be embarrassing for both of you.

Even if you aren't home with your kid 24 hours a day, it's still possible to use the techniques when you are around. It's not an all-or-nothing solution. You can diaper part of the time, and communicate with your child about eliminating when you are around. One cool thing is that most kids who have learned to control their elimination from birth have very little trouble with bed-wetting. 10% of 10 year olds still have bed-wetting episodes! That means 10% of 10 year olds are self conscious about and not fully in control of their elimination.
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34 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Crimsoncascade on May 7, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Using this book as a guide, we have been practicing EC with our daughter since week 6. It was great until recently (month 5) when she now can't sleep well (we have come to the conclusion) because she often wakes up and needs to go to the bathroom. After reading Elizabeth Pantley's no-cry sleep books, we now know the science behind baby sleep which has revealed that babies briefly wake up many times (between sleep cycles) throughout the night and then have to fall back to sleep either with help or on their own. The problem with EC for us is our baby will sleep for 40 minutes (typical sleep cycle lasts 40-60 minutes long) and then wake up, have the sudden awareness of a very full bladder (because this awareness has grown through the use of EC) and then cry out to go to the bathroom. She goes from deeply asleep to lightly awake and then fully awake after she senses her full bladder and has to be held over the potty. This fully wakes up the family and starts an hour long process of getting her back to sleep. When other babies of her age are sleeping 5 hours (our baby used to do this prior to developing great bladder and bowel awareness through the use of EC) now she rarely goes beyond 2 hours. Of course, different babies with different personalities will have different experiences, but this is what is happening in our family, and though EC has positives (it was great when she was suffering from gas and colic because it provided relief), I'd have to say I regret choosing to do EC now that I know it seriously disturbs our daughter's and our sleep. It also disturbs her day time naps which (based on sleep research) should be around a hour and a half, and are only around 40 minutes long (she wakes up needing to go to the bathroom between cycles because of EC and can't go back to sleep after going).Read more ›
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