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Diary of an Anorexic Girl Paperback – April 16, 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson (April 16, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0849944058
  • ISBN-13: 978-0849944055
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.5 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #709,685 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Morgan Menzie is a student at Vanderbilt University. She served as general editor for Sisterhood, and Diary of an Anorexic Girl is her first full-length novel. She was valedictorian of her high school class and now she's majoring in English. She has written for The Tennessean, and was editor of yearbook and literary magazine in high school. Morgan lives in Nashville, Tennessee in a cool apartment with some college friends.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

This is ridiculous really. I don't know who I think is going read this, but I feel encouraged when an audience is listening.

Mom always says I have a flare for the dramatics. It's usually derogatory, but in my infinite wisdom I have turned it in to a motto for life. You have to admit-if you were real you'd want me to talk to you directly. I would hate to exclude, so rather than risk hurting feelings real or imaginary, I will include you in my narrative. Mom also says I over-analyze things, but I don't think so at all and since you are my imaginary audience I have decided that you absolutely agree with me.

My grandpa gave me this journal and told me to start it today. Why, I don't know. Old people always have their reasons. He made the leather cover with my initials in the corner-in case you can't see it for yourself. He's from the country, or used to be before he moved to be closer to us, so homemade gifts are his specialty. I can't tell you how many tables and chests and shelves with pegs to hang keys on we've collected over the years. I suppose being from the country or the city for that matter would give your life color-you know that thing they always use in literature classes to analyze novels. (It's the point at which the author gets slammed. You raise your hand to say that you rather like the New England setting of The Cider House Rules only to be bull-dozed by the question of "Yes, but does it have color?" There's no true answer to that question, which I rather like, but which those teachers stubbornly refuse to acknowledge.) All I know is, I would rather be any place in any one of those novels than here in mindless suburbia, growing up then growing old in obscurity.

Mom says I take life too seriously. She says I'm only twelve years old and that I shouldn't worry about such matters. I say I've already had twelve years to warm up and I am ready to go. Pa always understood me. He didn't tell me what to do or remind me of how young I am.

All he said was, "Blythe, I want you to have this to write your life down in."

That's it; that's all he said before he began to whistle some old twangy hymn. For a man who could talk the bark off a tree, this was an abruptly short conversation, and perfectly suited for me.

So left with no guidance, here goes . . .


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Customer Reviews

The title of the book is a little bit misleading.
"jujuann"
To anyone, even if you're not anorexic or never have been, even if you think the disease is stupid, anyone should get this book.
S. Wright
I highly recommend it, especially for the frightening number of young women who are "wannabe" anorexics.
Fruit Loop

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 3, 2003
Format: Paperback
"Diary of an Anorexic Girl" by Morgan Menzie is a novel, but it is based on the author's own life and the journal she kept as she struggled and finally succeeded in beating the addiction. I know the intended audience is young adults, but I think adults will gain a lot of understanding from hearing what anorexia is like from someone who has it. The best part of the story is the strength that Blythe draws from her faith in God and how that faith ultimately leads to her triumph.
If you are anorexic, or have a family member or friend who is, or simply want to know more about what it is like to have this disorder, this book can open your eyes.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By "jenniferravril" on August 7, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book provided amazing insight into the life of a girl struggling with an eating disorder. It not only allows the reader to gain understanding of the complicated issues that are part of an eating disorder, but also portrays the other aspects of the girl's life and how they are affected.
What makes this book truly enjoyable to read, however, is the witty style and the clever prose with which is was written. The young girl's comically melodramatic personality and wisdom beyond her years shine's through in each journal entry.
Through the pages, Morgan Menzie materializes and leads the reader through a tearful,yet laughter-filled journey of her adolescence. This book is definitely one of those books where the reader sits down and reads until she is finished, and even then is somewhat saddened to have reached the last page.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 16, 2003
Format: Paperback
Although the book is fictional, it is based on the wuthor's real-life experiences. This makes it more realistic than quite a lot of fictional books. The story is written in the style of a diary, from the point of view of Blythe. At the outset, she is 13, but gradually gets older as the book progresses. It is set in America. I don't want to give too much away about the plot, but Blythe's problems begin when she starts to compete with Laurie, another girl in her year who has anorexia. It spirals from there. I would recommend this book to both teenagers and adults as it's very good for an afternoon's reading. It's not too heavy, either.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 19, 2004
Format: Paperback
After reading Lori Gottlieb's STICK FIGURE: A DIARY OF MY FORMER SELF, I didn't think I'd find another collection of diaries that spoke about anorexia with such honesty and compassion. I've struggled with anorexia, and both books (STICK FIGURE and this one) have been by my bedside because I find it helpful and comforting to read parts of them over and over. I strongly recommend both books for not just anorexics, but for families and friends who truly want to understand the experience and what they can do to help.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 12, 2003
Format: Paperback
I would disagree wholeheartedly with the reviewer who said that they were hoping for a "traumatic account." This is an honest, moving account that still manages to be humorous at points. No one wants to read a depressing, whiny book like the previous reviewer seemed to want. If you want a thoughtful book that will make you both laugh and cry, this is it. Highly recommended for those who have friends or family battling eating disorders.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By GABBY! on December 1, 2003
Format: Paperback
My friend asked for this book as a birthday present. When I went to buy it, I read the back and wanted to read it for myself. I ended up reading the whole book (after I gave it to my friend) within 2 and a half hours. This book was definantly a page turner. I have known people (my grandma and my mother) that were anorexic, and they have read it as well, and liked it. The story line seems very real. It's a definant must read!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By W. L. Bradley on May 29, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book was great. It tells of the struggles of a girl with anorexia--but not in a cliched sort of way. There is a true, honest voice here, and being anorexic myself, I could relate to many parts it. The competitive side of an anorexic is accurately portrayed, and it gives good insight into the anorexic thought process. Highly recommended.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By S. Wright on April 21, 2006
Format: Paperback
Morgan Menzie's book was the first diary of an eating disorder I read, and is the reason why I continue to read more ED books. She unlike many ED authors talked about things other that just her eating disorder, such as relationships with friends, family and boyfriends. It's not a book that's all about anorexia but does emphasize more so than other subjects in her diary.

In her book, I believe she cover about mmm... three or four years, I really can't remember. Anyway it's a long period of time. One thing that she does that annoys the heck out of me is that she'll skip a whole month of entries but I guess that's the author's way of cutting out insignificant things.

Basically a girl named Blythe, which I think maybe be her middle name, becomes anorexic in middle school because of a friend. On of her friends begins to loose weight and Blythe decides she wants to loose to. But it goes beyond loosing weight it becomes a desire for thinness, and a fear of food.

Another thing I love about this book is Morgan keeps it so real. She said one of the- the truest thing EVER published about our human ways. It's on page 49 and is the...um... 4th paragraph I believe since the book is copy written I don't want to post it without permission. But what she says in that paragraph is so overwhelmingly true that I had to put down the book and think about my life. Although what she says is completely irrelevant to her eating disorder I couldn't write this review without reference to that paragraph.

Would I recommend it? Heck yeah! To anyone, even if you're not anorexic or never have been, even if you think the disease is stupid, anyone should get this book. Recoverees, havebeens, thinking about its and neverwillbees, get the book. You'll understand what it's like to have the disease for this one girl and may have a whole new outlook on anorexia.
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