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Diaspora and the Lost Tribes of Israel Hardcover – November 9, 2004


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 300 pages
  • Publisher: Universe; 1St Edition edition (November 9, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0883636042
  • ISBN-13: 978-0883636046
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 1.4 x 13.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #880,922 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

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His insight into such a unique subject was also very much appreciated by this reader.
Albert Cheng
Through the ages, great empires have risen and fallen, tyrants have come and gone, but the Jewish people have endured.
D. Davis
I took the book because of the awesome pictures, but I love the book because of the story the author has given to us.
T. Zielke

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By T. Zielke on January 9, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I took the book because of the awesome pictures, but I love the book because of the story the author has given to us. I'm a thirty something Catholic woman from the Midwest. I have had very little encounters with Jewish people. But after reading this book, I have a completely new understanding of what it means to be Jewish and the reasons behind the current conflicts in the Middle East.

The book is broken up into several categories that makes it easier to read and understand. I only wish that they had used maps in the book so I could see where the migrations started and ended. I ended up looking at my historical atlas along with reading the book.

After reading this book, no matter who you are, you will get the bigger picture of what life has been like for the Jewish people for the last 2500 years. These are people who truly have had no home where they could feel safe in for any lengthy period of time. Everywhere they went, they faced the cruelty of the local people and governments.

If you are at all interested in learning about the life of the Jewish people, this is a book you'll want to read.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Jay Lefkowitz on March 17, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Coffee-table booksd are usually notable for their pictures, and Amotz Asa-El's "The Diaspora and The Lost Tries of Israel" certainly does not disappoint in this regards, filled as it is by nearly 300 pages of photographs of Jewish life spanning six continents. But the accompanying text has a special claim on our attention. Mr. Asa-El, the executive editor of the Jerusalem Post, vividly captures both the creativity and the nomadic quality of the Jewish people. More important, he offers an engaging history of the Jewish experience by tracing he history of the Jewish Diaspora.

Mr. Asa-El's historical narrative begins with the post-biblical wanderings of the Jews from the first exile in 730 B.C.E., when thousands of Jewish refugees were forcibly relocated by ther Assyrians into what is today northeastern Syria. The second exile, some 150 years later, came in the aftermath of the Babylonian conquest of the First Temple. By the time of the Second Temple's destruction by Rome in C.E. 70 and the final rebellion against the Romans in 135-the dates most frequently cited as the beginning of the Diaspora-a majority of Jews were already residing outside the land of Israel.

Mr. Asa-el devotes most of the book to descriptions of individual Jewish communities in the Diaspora. He describes how, throughout the Middle Ages, Jewish merchants brought their traditions to the farthest corners of the world, establishing communities in the most remote parts of Africa and Asia, and also in major European and Middle Eastern countries. He chronicles the various legends and facts surrounding the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel, whose communities were as far-flung as Kaifeng, China, and Djerba, an island off the Tunisian mainland.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By D. Davis on May 24, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Jerusalem Post / 21 April 2005

Scattered peoples

By DOUGLAS DAVIS

The Diaspora and The Lost Tribes of Israel

By Amotz Asa-El

Hugh Lauter Levin Associates, Inc

300pp., $60

Jews were globalizers a couple of thousand years before the word was invented. Since the dawn of history, they have traversed countries and continents - sometimes willingly, often not - in search of safety, commerce, scholarship or out of simple curiosity.

Wherever they went they learned to juggle identities. They were loyal to their adoptive lands while retaining a transcendental commitment to their ancient homeland, whether notional or actual. With all this, they maintained an unbreakable tribal/national cohesion that derives from a shared history and heritage. The development of the Diaspora, and its persistence against all odds, is one of the great human dramas in the history of mankind.

In The Diaspora and the Lost Tribes of Israel, Amotz Asa-El shines a piercing light on the Diaspora, from its birth to the present. Appropriately, it is a distinguished journalist (the executive editor of this newspaper) who has chosen to chronicle one of the most important stories of all time. And ironically, it is an Israeli who has brought the story of the Diaspora - and the "lost tribes" - to a worldwide audience.

Through the ages, great empires have risen and fallen, tyrants have come and gone, but the Jewish people have endured. Wherever they settled, they brought with them a cultural ecosystem suffused with morality and imbued with an intellectual energy that transmitted its message far and wide.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J.M. Schwartz on December 19, 2005
Format: Hardcover
From Hasaddah Magazine, August-September 2005

By Joan Michel Schwartz

In case you thought the Diaspora started with the Roman conquets of Judea in 70 CE think again. "Jewish communities have for untold centuries been prone to appear, disappear, and reappear almost everyewhere," writes Amotz Asa-El in this magnificent must-have book, "arguably belonging simultaneously everywhere and nowhere."

The intriguing social-political assessment of the Diapsora by the Jerusalem Post's executive editor starts in Israel, goes around the world to the remotest places to track the lost tribes, and returns to Israel, retelling this incredible story.

More than 270 atriking illustrations -- including archival and contemporary photographs -- capture the traditions, rituals anddaily lives of Jews of all colors and shapes in Djerba, Mozambique, Russia, Predborz, Samaria, Tibilisi, Susa, Kaifeng and Uganda, where you see a group of Abudaya Jews in front of a Hadassah infant school.
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