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Dictionary for Theological Interpretation of the Bible Hardcover – November 1, 2005


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 896 pages
  • Publisher: Baker Academic; First Edition edition (November 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801026946
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801026942
  • Product Dimensions: 10.4 x 7.3 x 2.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #102,120 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Kevin J. Vanhoozer (Ph.D., University of Cambridge) is research professor of systematic theology at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. He is the author of several books, including Is There a Meaning in This Text?

Craig G. Bartholomew (Ph.D., University of Bristol) holds the H. Evan Runner Chair in Philosophy at Redeemer University College in Ontario. He is the coauthor of The Drama of Scripture.

Daniel J. Treier (Ph.D., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School) is assistant professor of theology at Wheaton College.

N. T. Wright (D.Phil., University of Oxford) is bishop of Durham and author of over forty books, including Jesus and the Victory of God, The Resurrection of the Son of God, and a popular series of guides to the New Testament.

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Customer Reviews

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This has been an excellent resource for my biblical studies.
Amazon Customer
The dictionary provides definitions of hermeneutical methods, theological themes, doctrinal terms, historical criticism, and biblical explanations of each Bible book.
rj_mccauley
This book is an enchiridion that stands as a great testament to the vast learning of the many scholars who contributed.
Derrick A. Peterson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

82 of 87 people found the following review helpful By Derrick A. Peterson on January 14, 2006
Format: Hardcover
This book is an enchiridion that stands as a great testament to the vast learning of the many scholars who contributed.
The Book itself is simply fantastic, and all of the articles are suprisingly in-depth despite the vast array of territory covered. The list of contributors is a virtual whos-who of thinkers in the field of theology today (besides Kevin Vanhoozer, NT Wright and the other two editors, Craig Bartholomew of Bristol and D. Treier of of Wheaton, contributors include I. Howard Marshall, Grant Osborne, Anthony Thistleton, Stanley Grenz, Merold Westphal, Nancy Murphy, and Alistair McGrath, just to name a few) though, of course, this should not be an automatic criteria for sucess, it is nonetheless an impressive and well rounded display of expertise.

This dictionary is particularly quite helpful when it comes to outlining contemporary theories of interpretation, and has very thourough expositions on Post-structuralism, Deconstructionism, Reader-Response Criticism, Speech-Act theory, Feminist, Liberationist, and the so called "Yale" school of Narrative Post-Liberal Theologians like Lindbeck and Frei, to mention a few. Also, there are detailed commentaries/interpretive principles and exposition on particular areas of traditional and contemporary thought regarding every book of the bible, and there are even entries on particular authors (most prominantly, of course, seems to be writings on Paul, where there is an interesting description of how schools of thought have interpreted his writings, e.g.
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38 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Michael Dalton VINE VOICE on January 25, 2007
Format: Hardcover
It would be a mistake to think of this as a Bible Dictionary. This dictionary seeks to do much more. As Kevin J. Vanhoozen states in his informative introduction, "DTIB aims to provide clarification, analysis, and evaluation of the various approaches to biblical interpretation currently in the marketplace, with a view to assessing their theological significance--in particular, their value for reading Scripture in and for the community of the faithful." Without advocating any one particular approach to interpretation--the contributors represent diverse theological backgrounds, denominations, and interpretative approaches--the essays provide a framework for not only discovering what the Bible means, but also how to read it.

The opening article on the Book of Acts starts with an overview of its historical interpretation. It includes the mention of John Chrysostom composing the first full commentary on the book to comment on more recent studies focusing on the form of the texts.

The next section is a summary of the themes and meaning of Acts. A short paragraph at the end touches on a topic debated today. Is the Holy Spirit received in all his fullness at conversion, or is there a subsequent experience called the "baptism in the Holy Spirit"?

The last two sections highlight the place of Acts in relation to the rest of Scripture, and most importantly, its practical significance for believers today.

One of the concluding thoughts highlights the value of this resource: "The evangelistic speeches in Acts focus on the resurrection of Jesus, suggestive of a corrective to today's evangelistic message and preaching," which spend more time on the death of Jesus.

Each of the books of the Bible is covered in a similar fashion.
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Format: Hardcover
Dictionary for Theological Interpretation of the Bible is an exhaustive resource offering in-depth definitions of terms commonly encountered when engaged in theologic study of the Bible. From allegory as a device for interpreting Biblical passages that fell into disfavor since the eighteenth century but is occasionally still used at the popular level, to a brief history of the interpretation of the Book of Zechariah, Dictionary for Theological Interpretation of the Bible is filled with thoughtful, well-reasoned discourse and is highly accessible to readers of all backgrounds. A valuable resource for amateur and professional theologians, and especially recommended for beginning theologians or others new to the study of Biblical passages.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Mason Slater on December 12, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This is a great piece of scholarship with a great format, has been a very influential resource for me, and is in my opinion the best work to come out of the Theological Interpretation camp thus far.
Throughout my studies I rarely fail to turn to the articles of this Dictionary to illuminate anything from the book of Ephesians, to the relationship between the Church and Israel, to the nuances of Christianities interaction with postmodernism.
It features an all-star cast of contributers, such as Kevin VanHoozer, Darrell Bock, Daniel Trier, N.T. Wright, and R.T. France, as well as many more each commenting on their individual area of expertise.

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By rj_mccauley on January 3, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
There are several Christian dictionaries on the market today, but nothing compares to this new resource overseen by evangelical scholar Kevin Vanhoozer. This book works just like any other dictionary, yet it updates biblical definitions with extensive academic research in a concise manner. The dictionary provides definitions of hermeneutical methods, theological themes, doctrinal terms, historical criticism, and biblical explanations of each Bible book.

I highly recommend this outstanding resource for every library. Get this book!
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