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Diego Hardcover – January 9, 2007


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Hardcover, January 9, 2007
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 - 7 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 2
  • Hardcover: 40 pages
  • Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers (January 9, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679819878
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679819875
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 7.4 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,015,422 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 1-4-- An accessible picture book about the life and work of Diego Rivera sounds like an oxymoron, but Winter and Winter succeed beyond belief. His early life is the focus; the text in Spanish and English captions the paintings. It does a journeyman's job of conveying facts in well-condensed sentences; the Spanish translation is clear and easy to follow even for those readers without fluency in the language. Each picture is bordered with Mexican folk-art designs done in vivid, resonant, tropical tones. The paintings themselves are done in Rivera's own colossal style, even though they actually measure only a few inches square. Winter displays her clear knowledge of and love for her subject. Frida Kahlo appears in one scene without any identification other than her distinctive eyebrows; this subtle allusion is the only mention of Rivera's tempestuous personal life. The last pictures show him as a young man, perched on his scaffolding, brushes in hand, beckoning viewers on with his ardent glance. Readers will wish they could follow. --Ruth Semrau, Lovejoy School, Allen, TX
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Kirkus Reviews

A bilingual life of the great Mexican muralist Diego Rivera, weighted toward his early life (he was a poor scholar whose sympathetic parents provided plenty of artistic materials and sent him to art school quite young) and his pride in his heritage. Winter's small, bordered paintings, in rich, intense colors, nicely evoke folk motifs and other themes in Rivera's work, including his concern for ``poor people'' and their ``war for equality.'' An excellent beginning biography. (Biography/Picture book. 6-10) -- Copyright ©1991, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 17 customer reviews
One of the best children's books I have ever read.
kar
The illustrations by Jeanette Winter are beautiful, richly colored accompaniments to the colorful life of Diego Rivera.
ofdaleys
I only wish it was a larger book (like the Frida book by the same author).
ayalar

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 20, 2003
Format: Paperback
I love this book and bought it for a nephew a few years ago. The 4 stars are for the hardcover edition. I ordered the paperback version for my son and was very disappointed. The illustrations are very small--the words in English and Spanish take up much of the space, and the colors are completely washed out. Only the colors on the cover are true to the original version--and they make you see what you're missing inside the book. Do not waste your money on this version. It doesn't do the book justice; the gorgeous illustrations and their glorious colors are not at all evident in this cheapo paperback.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 15, 1998
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent bi-lingual text about Diego Rivera's childhood. This book not only introduces children from 4 to 9 years old to an important Mexican artist, but it also presents wonderful, colorful pictures that will excite children. The text is written in both English and Spanish. This book is a good way to get children interested in the Spanish language. It also is a good seque to discussing Diego Rivera, Mexican art, and muralists. My son has enjoyed it immensely.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By ofdaleys on March 26, 2006
Format: Paperback
Diego Rivera's biography is told in this superbly illustrated text. The story begins as he is born, and ends many years later after Rivera has become a famous Mexican muralist, however much of the text focuses on Rivera's childhood. The text is written in both English and Spanish on every page. Both languages are written in concise sentences that clearly convey information about Rivera's life and work. Each page also has a brightly colored picture that reinforces the text's message.The illustrations by Jeanette Winter are beautiful, richly colored accompaniments to the colorful life of Diego Rivera. The motifs in them are those typically found in Mexican folk art and include appropriate colors and subjects, often echoing those found in Rivera's work. This is a delightful and age appropriate introduction to an artist whose tempestuous personal life sometimes overshadows his outstanding artistic accomplishments both inside and outside of Mexico. Students who are interested in art or Mexican history will find this book to be a treasure. Native Spanish speakers could use this text in the classroom to share their knowledge of the Spanish language and Mexican culture.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 20, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is a wonderful bilingual book to introduce young children to the incredible work of Diego Rivera. It has an interesting focus on the earlier years of Diego's life, allowing children to relate to him easier. The illustrations are vibrant and colorful and reflect Rivera's style of painting.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Medievalist in Dallas on September 2, 2001
Format: Paperback
My kids, who are 2 and 5, really enjoyed this book. It makes a fantastic gift for children, and I keep coming back to buy more copies to have on hand for birthday parties and the like. The illustrations are in the style of Rivera's own work, and the story is accessible for young readers.
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Format: Paperback
Told in simple, straightforward text, this small children's book relates the story of Diego Rivera, a famous Mexican artist who loved his art and the people of his country. Diego spent his whole life painting, drawn to the vibrant colors and magical rituals of Mexico as well as the troubles of the people as they fought for equality and better working conditions.

At birth, Diego was not a strong child. He had a twin bother, Carlos, who died before he reached the age of two. Diego's parents, fearing their other son would die from the same illness as his small brother, sent him to a nurse, Antonia, who was also an Indian healer and lived in the mountains. Her cozy hut fragrant with burning candles and healing herbs, Antonia's mountain home was filled with fresh air and the natural plants necessary to make the boy well. Diego entertained himself with the animals around him; he even had a pet parrot and was soon well enough to return home to his parents.

Upon Diego's homecoming, his imagination already infused with the brilliant colors of nature, the boy began to draw and paint on very surface. He had difficulty in school, constantly distracted by the paintings he was dreaming of creating, unable to concentrate on anything but the wonderful world his mind inhabited. Finally Diego attended art school, but even that failed to stimulate the artist, for he felt constrained by the rules and the life drawings the teachers expected from their students. The paintings Diego imagined were of the bright fiestas, the celebration of the Day of the Dead and the struggles of the people confronting soldiers in the streets. Holding nothing back, it was Diego's plan was to show it all, the many faces of his beloved land.
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Format: Hardcover
This is a concise little biography about the artist, Diego Rivera. Winter (The Librarian of Basra, 2005) begins Rivera's story with his birth. He was a sickly infant who survived because of the devoted care of an Indian healer. His twin brother did not live. He was a daydreamer in school but his parents encouraged his artistic abilities. He studied art in Europe but was inspired by his memories of life in Mexico. Winter ends the book as Rivera's career as a painter whose "murals told the story of the Mexican people" is just beginning.

The text is in English and Spanish. Each of Winter's illustrations is edged in a unique painted frame. I wish they had chosen to feature the illustrations in a larger format. The paintings are colorful and engaging and deserve more page space.
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