Qty:1
  • List Price: $39.95
  • Save: $3.99 (10%)
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by OldBeachBooks
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: some writing
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $11.75
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Difference and Givenness: Deleuze's Transcendental Empiricism and the Ontology of Immanence (Topics in Historical Philosophy) Paperback – April 2, 2008


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$35.96
$35.44 $30.19
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

Difference and Givenness: Deleuze's Transcendental Empiricism and the Ontology of Immanence (Topics in Historical Philosophy) + The Democracy of Objects
Price for both: $52.24

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Northwestern University Press; 1 edition (April 2, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0810124548
  • ISBN-13: 978-0810124547
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #884,215 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"It is high time that we had a book like this: not only does Bryant read Deleuze as a philosopher; his is a reading done by a philosopher. . . . Bryant proposes an original interpretation of Deleuze's philosophical work, concentrating on Deleuze's magnum opus, Difference and Repetition, and using the theme of 'transcendental empiricism' as his guiding thread. . . . The result is a persuasive and nuanced interpretation of the ontology that lies at the core of Deleuze's philosophical work."

—Daniel W. Smith, Purdue University
--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Levi R. Bryant is a professor at Collin College in Frisco, Texas. His work focuses on the contemporary theory, Freudian-Lacanian psychoanalysis, and the history of philosophy.


More About the Author

Levi R. Bryant is a professor of philosophy at Collin College outside of Dallas in Texas. His work focuses heavily on questions of ontology and he defends a realist conception of being that argues that the world is composed of objects that exist at a variety of different levels of scale. He has published widely on Deleuze, Lacan, Badiou, and a variety of other thinkers, and is heavily influenced by developmental systems theory, sociological systems theory, autopoietic theory, as well as thinkers such as Bruno Latour, Graham Harman, Isabella Stengers, Niklas Luhmann, and Roy Bhaskar. He is especially interested in science and technology studies, media studies, and digital humanities. Bryant can be reached at larval_subjects@yahoo.com.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Justin Evans on July 15, 2008
Format: Paperback
Many, many silly things have been written by and about Gilles Deleuze; by comparison Bryant's book stands out as a beacon of sense, clarity, youth truth beauty and all the other great things there are. Just buy it.

If you need to be further convinced: he reads Deleuze in the light of Kant, rather than as a Nietzschean 'everything-is-power-and-we-must- fight-the-forces-of-ressentiment' type. He takes the philosophy of difference given in 'Difference and Repetition' and 'The Logic of Sense' to be an answer to the problem of the Kantian passivity of reception. For Deleuze, Kant gives up on the critical project by not asking what makes the given of receptivity possible. Although Kant shows the transcendental conditions for the possibility of experience (being the conceptual determination of intuitions) he doesn't show the transcendental conditions for *real* experience: to do so would be to give the conditions for intuitions, or receptivity. Deleuze's answer to this question, what allows the given to be given, is Difference, which is located in a constellation of terms: Idea, structure, problems and so on.

Bryant reads 'experience' primarily in terms of the individuation of objects, it is individuation that difference explains (that is, how object x can be said to differ from object y). Deleuze takes previous philosophies to be incoherent with regard to individuation, because they take the individuation of an object to be dependent upon something external to it. Empiricists can only say 'this x is this red because it isn't that slightly different red;' Kantians can only say 'we can say this is this because our concept and intuition match up here.' Both are cases of 'representation,' according to which individuation is an effect of the subject rather than the object.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Brian C. on March 31, 2012
Format: Paperback
This is, in my opinion, the best book on Deleuze in English. It is certainly a challenging book, and I do not feel entirely qualified to summarize its contents. Luckily, the previous reviewer did an excellent job summarizing the contents of this work, so my review will merely be an attempt to reinforce some of the points made in the previous review.

Bryant's book is one of the few books I have read that really attempts to treat Deleuze as a serious philosopher. Deleuze has a reputation for being an affirmer of difference, a critic of representation, and a Dionysian reveler. That reputation is not entirely unfounded but a problem arises when we imagine that Deleuze's critiques of representation and his affirmations of becoming absolve us from the task of justifying those positions in a rigorous way through argumentation.

Levi Bryant takes many Deleuze interpreters to task for beginning from a normative standpoint and critiquing representation, the subject, morality, and the State from that standpoint, without actually providing any justification for that standpoint. It is simply assumed that representation, the subject, morality, and the State are "bad" without explaining why. Contrary to the commentators who follow this method Bryant argues, "One does not adopt the position of transcendental empiricism because it is against representation.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
Beautiful and systematic summation of the work of G Deleuze. Ought to have drawn more attention from analytic readers. Hope it does.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?