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Different Flags Paperback – February 1, 2002


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Editorial Reviews

Review

" Good understanding of the hopes and dreams of young women. Charming view of the Argentina of the 1980s." -- Bea Sheftel, Reviewer, compulsivereader.com

" Readers will find Eugenia Renskoff's book to be insightful entertainment." -- Harriet Klausner, harstan@ix.netcom.com

"A remarkable story of a young lady trying to discover a passion for life by conquering life's most difficult tribulations." -- kimgaona, reviewer, kimgaona.com

"Eugenia Renskoff has produced an absorbing book." -- Molly Martin, reviewer, scribesworld.com

As Ani matures through the life experiences of work,travel and grieving, a threee-dimensional character emerges. -- knowbetter.com, 2002

Different Flags is a novel of unrequited love, friendship, family, loneliness and nostalgia for the people left behind. -- MultiCultural Review, September 2002

Eugenia Renskoff captures the essence of South American Catholicism and its powerful imprint upon Argentinian life." -- Julie Sandland, Reviewer, knowbetter.com

From the Author

I have enjoyed writing Different Flags, and I think the experiences of Ani, the protagonist, are universal and something that many women can relate to. She goes through changes in her life without guidance from anyone, and she survives them all to become a stronger, better person.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: Denlingers Pub Ltd (February 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0877142572
  • ISBN-13: 978-0877142577
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.5 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,731,263 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 7, 2002
Format: Paperback
Different Flags, by Eugenia Renskoff, is an entertaining book. It begins in San Francisco when Ani, 26, receives a telegram. She sells a few pieces of jewelry to go to Argentina. As Ani comforts her widowed Aunt Esther, she falls for the young parish priest. This is a very absorbing novel, showing the heroine's changing feelings as she travels from inmature to adult.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By juanita fogliati on August 9, 2003
Format: Paperback
I enjoyed reading Different Flags. The story and events thoughout the book were most interesting and informative to one who has never lived in Buenos Aires. I liked the descriptions of the characters, the story teller, her Aunt and the Priest and the neighbors. The development of their relationship and interaction with each other was skillfully done. At times I had a real vision of their home, their neighborhood and daily routines. The only criticism I have with the book is the syntax. Some of the sentences end with a preposition. Perhaps the author meant to show us how the characters would talk if this were real life. My sister has also enjoyed Different Flags, and we just passed it on to another friend.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By NYC Reader on December 8, 2004
Format: Paperback
Ani is a 26 year-old San Franciscan whose life is stuck in a rut. She is lonely, unfulfilled and longing for an independent life.

After her uncle passes away, she heads for Buenos Aires (where she spent her early childhood before her family emigrated to the U.S.) to care for her widowed tia, Esther.

The balance of the novel chronicles Ani's personal growth and self-discovery as she negotiates with her tia's heartless landlord, cares for the elderly through her local church and copes with her feelings for Padre Luis, her parish priest.

The prose and story have a relaxed pace that reflects the lives of Ani and Esther as they go about their daily routines, which invariably includes a daily dose of mortadella and café con leche.

The author does a great job in conveying a sense of local life and in character development. Ani and Esther are genuine people with whom the reader can empathize. I particularly felt for the stubborn and likeable Esther, who had a hard life and, at an advanced age, must deal with the uprooting of a life she had known for decades.

The novel's core strength lies in how Ani deals with loneliness, depression and a desire for a happier, more fulfilling life. Anyone who has felt similarly will relate to Ani and, at the novel's conclusion, will wish her the best.

As for criticisms, I would have liked a little background as to how Ani, at the age of 27 and having grown up in San Francisco, came to be so naïve. She seems quite sheltered, with no profession, close friends or relationship experience. Like Sandy in Grease, she is a prime candidate for a makeover, and at one point I wished I could have bought her a Long Island iced tea, a pack of cigarettes and a gift certificate to some trendy clothing store.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By "webmaster4419" on October 10, 2003
Format: Paperback
Ana a 27 year old woman lives with her parents in San Francisco. An Argentinian by birth Ani opts to go stay with her mother's sister for a time following the aunties' becoming a widow. Ani learns her Tia is being evicted from the home where she and Tio Jose lived for so many years. Ani stays with her aunt for a year during which time she begins to work with one of the charitable groups at her Tia's church and finds she is drawn to the young priest. Ani returns to San Francisco when she learns her father is dying. Not long after her Russian born Father's death Ani returns to Argentina in time to help her auntie find a suitable new home.
This was an interesting book written in first person style. The format is one which finds a good bit of author information listed first, suggestion move to the back of the book. The particular format for this book is a little different than many I have read a list of 41 chapters allow the reader to click on and find the particular place where he may have stopped reading.
Writer Renkoff has produced an absorbing book filled with entertaining and mostly believable characters. I did find Ani a bit too naïve for an American girl, while born in Argentina, Ani has been raised in California since childhood. Even in the most sheltered of homes it is hard for this California gal to be convinced so innocent a 27 year old would come from that state.
The book is a pleasant read touching on the day to day lives of rather average people trying to live and make sense of the world around them. Entertaining, recommended for those who are not into graphic sex and profanity.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Linda Beed, D.R.E. on January 14, 2004
Format: Paperback
If you're looking to stretch the boundaries of your literary intellect, Different Flags is a read that will assist you.

Ms. Renskoff has crafted a tale of forbidden love rarely spoken or written of. Her writing style, though simplistic, paints an indelible picture for the readers. So descriptive are the scenes that you feel you have a connection to the country and its inhabitants. It is the presentation of the character's thoughts and interaction, that draws you into this tale.

Ani, a native Argentine finds herself returning to her homeland to care for an elderly aunt. Upon arrival she is faced with her aunt's possible eviction. Remaining in Buenos Aires for a year, Ani involves herself with care of her aunt and charity work. This involvement places her in a precarious position, due to development of affection for the parish priest. Her emotions are those experienced by many. Her story is unique due to the object of her affection.

Different Flags, a refreshing step away from the norm. It challenges while entertaining and teaching.
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