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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Building Bridges?
This book, unfortunately highly controversial in some Protestant circles, is the product of the friendship of Robert Millet, who teaches ancient scripture at Brigham Young University, and Richard Mouw, president of Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California.

Its publication clearly marks a significant advance in the relationship of evangelicals and...
Published on December 8, 2008 by Crazy Horse

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20 of 47 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Only For A Select Audience
If a person's spiritual quest leads them to examine Mormonism, they will need to resolve a key issue very quickly. That issue is: do divinely inspired texts on which to base Christian beliefs exist outside the Bible. If the answer is yes, then a further exploration of Mormonism is possible. If the answer is no, then Mormonism is a dead end for one's spiritual...
Published on June 5, 2006 by Michael Lima


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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Building Bridges?, December 8, 2008
This review is from: A Different Jesus?: The Christ of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
This book, unfortunately highly controversial in some Protestant circles, is the product of the friendship of Robert Millet, who teaches ancient scripture at Brigham Young University, and Richard Mouw, president of Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California.

Its publication clearly marks a significant advance in the relationship of evangelicals and Latter-day Saints. In the past all that was available in Protestant bookstores was the badly informed, highly polemical literature written by the partisan anti-Mormon element of the countercult industry.

Without realizing it, those who have turned to this literature for an understanding of the Church of Jesus Christ have done something analogous to consulting Nazi propaganda for an understanding of the faith of Jews or to old Communist propaganda for an understanding of American life and culture.

Latter-day Saints can also benefit from giving careful attention to Millet's presentation of their faith to Protestants. If there is a weakness in Millet's book, it stems from his inattention to the historical elements in the faith of the Saints and thus his inattention to the sophisticated literature on the historical authenticity of the Book of Mormon.

Sorting out theological issues for evangelicals, as useful as that is, still leaves the crucial truth questions bracketed. However, by publishing Millet's book, Eerdmans, a leading evangelical press, has now made available in Protestant bookstores a sound, nonpolemical presentation of the fundamentals of the faith of the Saints.
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20 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Latter-day Saints are part of the Christian community--, July 11, 2008
By 
Neuro (Placentia, CA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: A Different Jesus?: The Christ of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
I also recommend _Claiming Christ: A Mormon-Evangelical Debate_ by Robert L. Millet and Gerald R. McDermott.

Pastor McDermott, who is a Lutheran pastor and college professor has concluded after careful study that, "Evangelicals and Mormons agree on lots of things about Jesus. Many evangelicals are surprised to learn, for example, that Mormons believe not only that Jesus is the Son of God but also that he is God the Son. I find that many evangelicals have somewhere picked up the idea that Mormons deny the deity of Jesus Christ. They are often amazed to learn that, unlike Jehovah's Witnesses and other groups they typically classify as "cults," which do indeed deny the deity of Christ, Mormons declare emphatically that Jesus was and is incarnate God. ... I have to say that evangelical agreement with [Mormons] on Jesus is significant and, when compared to a history of evangelical denunciations of Mormonism, remarkable." (pg. 63,64)
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Description of My Faith in Christ, June 22, 2010
By 
D. Phelps (Denver, CO USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: A Different Jesus?: The Christ of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
I am a born-again Mormon, and I love this book. Millet does an excellent job of describing how members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints see Jesus Christ, what it means to us to have faith in him, and how we perceive that we are saved by his grace. He beautifully describes MY faith in Jesus Christ as the Son of God, God the Son, and my Savior and Redeemer.

This book is written with the intent to inform rather than to persuade. There is no proselyting in this book. It is simply a thorough description of who Christ is to the Latter-day Saints, what we believe about him and why.

I highly recommend this book to anyone who sincerely wants to understand how Mormons view Christ. They will come away well-informed, and with a deeper understanding of whether or how the Jesus we believe in is fundamentally "different" than the Jesus they believe in. Those who value increased understanding as indispensable to loving one's neighbor will enjoy this rich resource.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Solid, Thorough, and Accurate Examination, June 25, 2009
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P. Powell (Rexburg, Idaho) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: A Different Jesus?: The Christ of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
This is another fantastic work in a long line of Robert Millet's writings. In his traditional manner, the book is a solid, thorough, and accurate examination of the subject. It is also written in a user-friendly and insightful way. Definitely "five stars" from me.
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72 of 99 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Worthwhile Contribution., June 28, 2005
This review is from: A Different Jesus?: The Christ of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
As a former evangelical of 32 years and now member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints living in the heart of the bible-belt I have had many opportunities to dialogue with my evangelical brothers and sisters. Invariably when discussing our views on faith the old familiar "You follow a "different" Jesus" accusation pops up. Before getting stuck in this semantic loop I sometimes attempt to circumvent this stumbling block and get on to more fruitful interaction by initiating the following dialog and illustration.

-ME: Is the Jesus that you follow the same Jesus that we read about in the New Testament?
+EVANGELICAL BROTHER: "Yes"
-Did this same Jesus, after his resurrection, walk, and talk and eat with his disciples in a very real and physical way?
+ "Yes, he did"
-Sometime after this event did this same Jesus ascend in a very physical way and promise to return in the same fashion someday as was witnessed by others?
+ "Yes"
-So this same Jesus is at this very moment located somewhere in the universe right now is he not?
+ "Yes, i suppose so"
-Could this same Jesus come and stand here right next to us in a very real and physical way right now if he so chose?
+ "Yes, i suppose he could"
-For the sake of illustration let's pretend that this same Jesus did in reality choose to physically be here- and that he is standing right here next to us right now. Could we not speak and interact with him in the same fashion that you and I are interacting with each other right now if he so chose to do so?
+ "Yes"
-I could put my hand on his shoulder just like this could I not? (I literally hold my arm up as if my hand were on the shoulder of Jesus standing next to us)
+ "yes, I suppose you could"
-You could put your hand on his other shoulder too couldn't you- For the sake of this illustration can you put your hand there? (I literally ask them to put their arm up as if their hand were on the opposite shoulder of Jesus)
-I then say, with each of us having a hand on Jesus' shoulder- this is the Jesus that I follow. This is the Jesus that is testified about in the Book of Mormon. This is the Jesus whom I wholly look toward for my salvation and for forgiveness of my sins and is the "keeper of the gate". This is the Jesus in whose name I pray to the Father in. This is the Jesus at whose feet I will fall at the last day. Is this not the same Jesus that you follow? Rather than claiming we follow a "different" Jesus don't you think it would be much more accurate and more constructive if we were to agree that we do in fact follow the same Jesus- the one that is standing right here- but that we understand the same Jesus differently? If they are truly honest within themselves they will say- yes, we follow the same Jesus, but we understand the same Jesus differently. However, more times than not, within literally 1 minute back it comes- "No!, you worship a different Jesus!.

The net effect of Robert Millet's "A Different Jesus?" will be that it will become increasingly more and more difficult for critics of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to continue to make this claim while maintaining a straight face.

Robert L. Millet and Richard J. Mouw have made a significant contribution with this book and should be commended. It is not difficult to envision the improved interaction and dialogue that will flow from it. Hopefully this will be another step forward in a trend of more honest and genuine inter-faith interaction that is starting to emerge. As other individuals like Richard Mouw come to acknowledge the mischaracterization and fallacy of so much of the "anti-mormon" materials (and I do believe that there are others who are coming to see this truth as well and that it is a trend that will continue to grow in some circles) "A Different Jesus?" will help begin to fill in the hole for those individuals who genuinely want to understand the LDS position.

Another aspect i like about this book is that it is so well rounded. It contains a variety of elements that readers will find helpful beyond the main body of the book. It contains a forward by the prominent evangelical Richard Mouw, introductory notes titled "Why this Book was Written", next is an introduction titled "How it All Began", then six chapters that make up the bulk of the book. Following these six main chapters is a seventh chapter addressing 21 of the most "frequently asked questions" about Latter-day Saint Christianity followed by a conclusion section and then an afterward by Richard Mouw. Appendix A & B contains two documents important to Latter-day Saints in regard to setting forth their beliefs to others. These are "The Articles of Faith of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints" which contains thirteen articles of belief that stand as part of the official teachings of the Church. Next is "The Living Christ" a document composed by The First Presidency and Council of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on January 1, 2000 as part of the commemoration of Christs birth two millennium ago. Following the appendix is a glossary containing definitions of over 120 LDS words and terms followed by the bibliography and index. This book is well written and easy to read without being simplistic.

Non members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints will come away from reading this book with an enriched perspective, both deeper and wider than they might have previously had of LDS Christianity and will perhaps realize that they have more common ground with their Mormon Christian brothers and sisters than they might have previously understood. This book will also go a long way toward "de-programming" those who have been negatively scripted by exposure to too much bad "anti-mormon" literature.

Those that are already members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints will find "A Different Jesus?" somewhat obvious- but a valuable tool for improving dialogues with their non-LDS Christian friends and neighbors.

Robert Millet has made a worthwhile contribution with this book as it is not difficult to imagine the improved interfaith dialogues it may engender. How can that not be a good thing?

Why some people would have a problem with the publisher for publishing this book is a mystery to me.
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12 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An unanswerable vindication of LDS Christology/soteriology, February 27, 2009
By 
Kevin D. Taylor (Corvallis, OR USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: A Different Jesus?: The Christ of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
I wish to direct the attention of all readers to the inane drivel spewed so copiously forth by the scandal-mongering, agenda-driven reviewers who assigned a one- or two-star rating to this book. I would have all consider not only the dearth of quotations from the actual book in such negative reviews, but the dishonestly partial use of what few quotations were presented.

Straining at the merest gnats, these casuistic, camel-swallowing detractors reveal a spirit that could as easily be turned from an assault on Mormonism to an open attack on the Bible itself.

Objection is made against the author's conception of Jesus as the firstborn of our Father in Heaven. And yet this doctrine finds support at once in the New Testament (Romans 8:29, Colossians 1:15) and, to those attuned to the Spirit of Truth, the Old (Numbers 18:15). Indeed, no one can claim membership in the body of Christ who denies His status as the firstborn (see Hebrews 12:23), and thus these critics in their purblind zeal reject even the very Christ.

Objection is also made against the author's identification of Jesus as a Brother. Here again we find LDS doctrine vindicated in full by no less a text than the Bible (Matthew 25:40, Matthew 28:10, John 20:17). Surely it could not be otherwise, as our Heavenly Father is designated "the Father of spirits" (Hebrews 12:9), and Jesus was as much as spirit as any other being created in God's image, so that the author of the epistle to the Hebrews is in his rights to place a clear distinction between Jesus and the Father (Hebrews 1:5).

Objection is also raised against the LDS doctrine of a Trinity composed of united but distinct Personages. Yet, to anyone possessed of common sense, a reading of Mark 1:11 is enough to show the soundness of such a doctrine. Only a man set on a belief that Christ was a ventriloquist par excellence could think otherwise after reading that passage. John, indeed, makes plain how the oneness of the Trinity is to be interpreted (John 17:11). Those who conceive of the Trinity as one indivisible substance would have no difficulty conceiving the same of Adam and Eve who were made "one flesh" (Genesis 2:24). Without any question, too, the vision splendid which was revealed to Stephen puts to utter silence any further controversy on the question of whether or not Jesus and His Father are one undivided substance (Acts 7:55-56).

Finally, objection is foolishly raised against the origins of Mormonism as being aberrant from the origins of primitive Christianity. Nothing could be further from the gospel truth. Jesus revealed Himself to men whom He would choose as Apostles and Prophets (1 Corinthians 12:28, Ephesians 4:11).

On all essential points, these lower-than-pond-scum wastrels who vilify the presentation of Mormon doctrine in this books stand at variance with the most biblical truths. We are therefore justified in dismissing once and for all Michael Lima's horribly wayward, grossly inaccurate assertion that "without accepting the central premise that Mormonism's sacred texts are divinely inspired, one will end up understanding how Millet gets to his beliefs without comprehending how he could think such beliefs are true." We are justified, as well, in casting aside Cooper Abram's asinine quip that "it is the Bible, not the BOM, D&C, or POGP that truthfully and accurately reveals to us who is God our Creator."

All of this is, of course, to say nothing of those so lost to decency that they do not draw the line at misattributing quotations to Brigham Young. K. Manning, who would fancy himself a "history buff," identifies Young as the source of the quotation, "As man now is, god once was; as god now is, man may yet become." But, in point of fact, it was Lorenzo Snow, and not Brigham Young, who gave this (non-canonical) utterance.

Let us have the matter clear: All negative reviews given of this book are worthless; totally, utterly, and completely.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A WIDE-RANGING LDS APOLOGETIC DEALING SPECIFICALLY WITH JESUS, July 26, 2011
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This review is from: A Different Jesus?: The Christ of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
Dr. Robert L. Millet (born 1947) is a professor of ancient scripture and emeritus Dean of Religious Education at BYU in Utah, who also appears frequently as a commentator on BYUTV and as Manager of Outreach and Interfaith Relations for Church Public Affairs. He is the author of a great many books, such as Getting at the Truth: Responding to Difficult Questions About LDS Beliefs, Latter-Day Christianity: 10 Basic Issues, Bridging the Divide: The Continuing Conversation between a Mormon and an Evangelical, Holding Fast: Dealing with Doubt in the Latter Days, etc.

He wrote in the "Why This Book Was Written" section of this 2005 book, "This book is not about blending views or jettisoning central verities or blurring important differences between faith groups. It is not, in other words, an effort at ecumenism. It is about understanding, about bridge-building... We cannot join hands on moral issues about which we agree wholeheartedly if we permit suspicion and misperception to govern our attitudes and our actions."

Here are some additional quotations from the book:

"Men and women in the earliest ages knew of a first estate, a premortal existence. Therefore, is it any wonder that several religious traditions are wedded to the idea of past lives?" (Pg. 25)
"Latter-day Saints do believe that baptism by proper authority is necessary for entrance into the highest heaven... At the same time, LDS doctrine affirms that each man or woman will receive all of the ... heavenly rewards they desire to receive, either in this life or the next." (Pg. 48-49)
"Joseph Smith evidently had many warm and friendly contacts with ministers of other religions. Quite a few of them joined the Church..." (Pg. 57)
"From the beginning (Joseph Smith) emphasized that the members of the Godhead are one in purpose... but separate beings, they are three gods." (Pg. 70)
"But ADDITION to the (biblical) canon is hardly the same as REJECTION of the canon." (Pg. 77)
"To be sure, Joseph Smith taught that man is an eternal being. He declared that the intelligence of man 'is not a created being; it existed from eternity, and will exist to eternity. Anything created cannot be eternal.'" (Pg. 83)
"Latter-day Saints believe in a type of universal salvation, not in the sense that everyone will one day dwell with God and be like God, but rather that all (who do not defect to perdition) will enjoy a measure of God's goodness and grace through inheriting a heaven of some type." (Pg. 108)
"By these standards of measure (from Walter Martin), the Latter-day Saints would certainly qualify as a cult. The problem for Rev. Martin is, of course, that the New Testament Christian Church would qualify also!" (Pg. 142)
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Directly from the source, November 11, 2011
By 
CougaNova (Arlington, VA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: A Different Jesus?: The Christ of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
Some Evangelical Christians are attempting to practice information control by blocking the book's publication in a Christian venue, and its distribution in Christian bookstores.
Ironically, those engaging in this cultish behavior are largely from the "countercult" industry who fear losing their monopoly on defining LDS beliefs, thereby allowing a Mormon its own right to define beliefs.

Millet is an excellent writer and an established scholar. As noted, this received the endorsement from an eminent Evangelical, Richard Mouw, who is the president of the largest seminary in the country.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Overview of LDS Doctrine of Jesus Christ, March 24, 2013
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Compares and contrasts LDS doctrine with that of "mainstream" Christian denominations. Considers who is really mainstream with the New Testament and who is mainstream with Greek philosophy.
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35 of 60 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Challenging your view of Jesus., August 3, 2005
This review is from: A Different Jesus?: The Christ of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
The author has done an excellent job of describing the Morman understanding of Jesus.He gives some insights into the Morman faith that one does not find elsewhere.This will broaden ones understanding of Jesus as a Protestant.It challenges ones thinking about who Jesus really is.
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A Different Jesus?: The Christ of the Latter-day Saints
A Different Jesus?: The Christ of the Latter-day Saints by Robert L. Millet (Paperback - April 14, 2005)
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