Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Difficulties With Girls Hardcover – February 23, 1991


See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, February 23, 1991
$19.99
Paperback, Import
"Please retry"
$0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$35.00
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Random House Value Publishing (February 23, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0517063190
  • ISBN-13: 978-0517063194
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,345,398 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Patrick Standish, "hardly going bald at all" at 37, reads girlie magazines and is having an affair with the woman next door. His over-accommodating wife Jenny, 28 and still childless seven years after her miscarriage, cozies up to gamy ex-Washington journalist Oswald Hart in an effort to bring her cad of a husband to his senses. The Standishes' sexual and emotional warfare forms the hub of Amis's wobbly satirical lunge through late 1960s London. Besides Patrick, other men having "difficulties with girls" include Timothy Valentine, who left his wife to try homosexuality; Simon Giles, pompous manager at the publishing firm where Patrick works; and Stevie and Eric, a gay couple prone to flamboyant arguments. With Swiftian glee, Amis deflates a menagerie of poets, publishers, academics and other snobs, phonies and egomaniacs. Yet on the whole, his satire is a flaccid, tedious affair that could have been set in the '80s as easily as in the '60s.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Everybody in Amis's new novel has difficulties with girls, even Jenny Standish, nee Bunn, whose husband Patrick can't leave them alone. Jenny and Patrick appeared in Amis's Take a Girl Like You ( LJ 1/1/61). Since then Patrick has moved on from teaching to editing, so Amis manages a number of running jokes about publishers. His main subject, however, remains the guerrilla war between the sexes. The year is 1967, a time ostensibly of liberation for heterosexuals and (especially in Britain) homosexuals alike--but only ostensibly. Amis is his country's funniest writer, yet some scenes here are so impenetrably British that only Anglophiles may get the joke. Buy accordingly.
- Grove Koger, Boise P.L., Id.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By ilprofessore on April 26, 2013
Format: Hardcover
In this 1988 novel Amis returns to two characters--the once virginal Jenny Bunn and the rakish Patrick Standish--who first appeared in "Take A Girl Like You"(1960). Eight or more years have passed since we first met them; they are now middle-class, married and childless, living in London where Patrick, no longer a teacher, has landed a job as an editor in a trendy publishing house packed with literary pretension and office intrigue. Jenny continues to teach and help children.

With microscopic accuracy, Amis chooses here to examine the slow inevitable erosion of marriage, and to document the machinery of adultery. Jenny and Bunn live in a building inhabited by many dissimilar people at all levels of British society, all of whose relationships, heterosexual and homosexual, have one thing in common: they are in a constant state of flux.

Much of this world, literary London in the late sixties, is seen through Jenny's eyes. As has always been the case with his writings, Amis displays his usual insight into how women think and behave, and, of all his memorable female characters, Jenny is perhaps the most human and sympathetic. Her essential goodness often inhibits her vision, which accounts for much of the humor in the book. Although she has now lived many years away from the provincial northern city where she has born, she has still not fully adjusted to the ways of the south, nor can she approve, try as she might, of the way more sophisticated people are allowed to behave. Her inherent small town decency is in distinct contrast with all other the self-absorbed urban characters around her, including her now very errant husband.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
I don't think this is quite up to its prequel, 'Take a Girl Like You', as it lacks the sheer zest of the earlier piece, but what it lacks in joy it almost makes up for in the determination of the dogged pursuit of the labyrinthine twists of the marriage-serpent's tail. The sheer energy of the author as well as his main protagonist are remarkable. It made me at least chuckle out loud all the way through.

This book also contains a healthy dose of prejudices. Five a day and all that. Bob Dylan said negativity won't pull you through. No but a few good splashes will get you round the block a few times.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?