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Diffusion of Innovations, Fourth Edition Paperback – February 1, 1995

ISBN-13: 978-0029266717 ISBN-10: 0029266718 Edition: 4th

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 518 pages
  • Publisher: Free Press; 4 edition (February 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0029266718
  • ISBN-13: 978-0029266717
  • Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 1.4 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #330,967 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Technovation Will remain a classic on innovation for the next decade. -- Review

About the Author

Everett M. Rogers is professor and chair of the Department of Communication & Journalism at the University of New Mexico. A past president of the International Communications Association, he is the author of A History of Communication Study (Free Press, 1994), Communication Technology (Free Press, 1986), and several other widely acclaimed books and articles on communication and innovation.

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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This book is a serious, yet enjoyable read.
Joe Liebel (st95uh9c@post.drexel.edu)
Well organized and full of relevant real-world case illustrations, this book is exceptionally well-done.
"infochief"
If you want to know how to get information to the next hire, read this book.
sdecherney@christianacare.org

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Randy Burge on August 7, 1999
Format: Paperback
Dr. Rogers is a brilliant sage whose lifelong quest for understanding how and why people adopt or deny innovation began, he tells me, on his family's farm in Iowa as a boy. At a young age he observed that some farmers were quick to adopt the latest innovations while many others were slower or even resistant to change. He also noticed that adoption didn't always equal success, nor did the refusal to change. So whether your gig is plowshares or computers or languages or healthcare or just about anything, you will find this book fascinating and illuminating. The book takes an "innovation" tour around the globe and through history with poignant examples of how new ways are diffused into societies. INC. magazine recently named this book as one of the 25 most important books written for understanding commerce. Ev is truly one of the wise men of today.
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27 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Anne Jolly on March 1, 2000
Format: Paperback
In my "real life" I am a classroom teacher who is working to establish collaborative study groups in two middle schools for the purpose of researching, examining, and improving teaching practice. Schools are organized to remain the same - not to change. This book has been invaluable in helping me understand the change process, things to consider when implementing change, and ideas for making change more palatable to teachers and administrators. I did not personally find it to be a "quick" read, but I found that the time I spent poring over the chapters paid real dividends.
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Chris Matthews on June 9, 2001
Format: Paperback
Professor Rogers begins his book by really getting to the heart of the matter. "Getting a new idea adopted, even when it has obvious advantages, is often very difficult," he writes. "Many innovations require a lengthy period, often many years, from the time they become available to the time they are widely adopted"
I have often wondered why getting new ideas adopted is so difficult, not only in business and technology, which is Professor Roger's primary area of research, but also in the arts, music, painting, and literature. It seems that whenever someone has a really innovative concept, it gets attacked, trashed, savaged, and often sabotaged by the mainstream? Why?
Professor Rogers never really answers this question, and this is my only complaint about an otherwise exceptional book. His primary interest is in figuring out ways to "speed up the rate of the diffusion of an innovation." Within a narrow context of business and policy objectives, he is successful. The strengths of this book are its very competent and exhaustive research, which include case studies, criticisms, and policy discussions. It is a worthy book if you are interested in the focused academic topics it attempts to address.
I thought that Malcolm Gladwell did a better job, with a much simpler book, in explaining why and how new ideas get introduced. Still, many questions remain to be answered about innovations. I'd love to read an equivalent book about innovations in the arts. If we are lucky, someone as competent and as thorough as Professor Rogers will take up the topic.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 30, 1997
Format: Paperback
"Innovations" are not just new products and technologies. It also includes ideas and the patterns that have been called "memes", indeed all social changes that require the voluntary cooperation of the members of society. This is the best of the books on this important and neglected subject. Indeed, it is one of the few. It should be required reading for anyone concerned about social change. One of the more interesting results of research in this area is that innovations diffuse through a society not as the result of broadcast messages but from direct contact between earlier and later adopters and the example provided to the latter by the former. Broadcast media are mainly useful for reinforcing this process. It is also interesting for the light it shines on competitive diffusion processes, such as the competing ideologies of contenders in a political conflict. Some innovations have a higher coefficient of diffusion than others, and, all other factors being equal, will prevail even if they lack objective merit.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By sdecherney@christianacare.org on May 30, 1999
Format: Paperback
Why the world is not speaking Everett M. Rogers name in the same breath as Edward M. Demings is a mystery to me. Prof Rogers has lucidly described how information is diffused throughout companies and communities. If you want to know how to get information to the next hire, read this book.
Additionally, like Edward Tufte's books on graphical presentation of data, Prof Rogers book is filled with fun stories of successes and failures. Read why we have electric and not more efficient gas refrigerators or why it took 250 years for the British Admiralty to adopt citrus fruit for its sailors to prevent death from scurvy.
This is a must read for anyone in corporate America
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By "infochief" on January 2, 2002
Format: Paperback
Well organized and full of relevant real-world case illustrations, this book is exceptionally well-done. Both educational and thoroughly entertaining. As complete as a textbook on the subject yet highly readable.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By divinorp@yahoo.com on October 4, 1999
Format: Paperback
this is one of a kind book that researchers in sociology, psychology and business can use. great to be used in determining the audience impact, use of certain media, tools, ideas, etc. the model used is exactly an innovation that researchers can't resist in using. a new paradigm shift in research methodology. the book is full of illustrative stories to use in related literature of a study. E. Rogers is an excellent scholar. i give him a five star award for his innovation. From: Prof. Rudy P. Divino, DBA(cand)
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