Programming Books C Java PHP Python Learn more Browse Programming Books
Digital Game-Based Learning and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $39.95
  • Save: $11.99 (30%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Digital Game-Based Learni... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Good binding. Clean, unmarked pages. Has an inscription on the title page.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Digital Game-Based Learning Paperback – March 1, 2007

ISBN-13: 978-1557788634 ISBN-10: 1557788634 Edition: Paragon House Ed

Buy New
Price: $27.96
36 New from $19.11 36 Used from $1.25
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$27.96
$19.11 $1.25
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

Digital Game-Based Learning + What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy. Second Edition + Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World
Price for all three: $52.19

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Paragon House; Paragon House Ed edition (March 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1557788634
  • ISBN-13: 978-1557788634
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,055,147 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Every corporate trainer and school-teacher in America, if not the world, should take a break right now and devour these fascinating and disturbing 50 pages.

From the Author

I wrote this book as a hands-on guide for anyone who has ever had trouble getting people (adults or kids) to learn things. Digital games are now being used to teach babies the alphabet, to help kids monitor their diabetes and overcome ADD, to teach both practical and tactical skills to the military, to teach financial derivatives to auditors and to teach CAD software to engineers, among many other things. And this is just the beginning -- ANYTHING can be taught more effectively through Digital Game-Based Learning. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Marc Prensky is an internationally acclaimed speaker, writer, consultant, visionary and innovator in the field of education and learning. Considered one of the world's leading experts on the connection between learning and technology, Marc's professional focus is on designing better pedagogy and curriculum for the digital generation. Strategy+Business magazine calls Prensky "That rare visionary who implements."

Prensky focuses on education from the perspective of the students, rather than the providers, offering solutions for how to teach and motivate today's students and for how to motivate and reinvigorate their teachers as well. Prensky promotes a new form of "partnering" between teachers and students. Through his writings and talks, he helps educators learn to adapt their pedagogy in ways that are far more effective for the 21st century.

Marc also focuses on how to teach future-oriented skills--including problem-solving, partnering, collaborating in online communities, video-making and programming--as an integrated part of all curricula. He is a strong partisan of teachers' knowing and using students' individual passions as motivators, and of students' participation in the design of their own education.

In his talks around the globe, Marc initiates and conducts unique educator-student dialogs about the teaching and learning process. His innovative combination of pedagogy and technology--including digital game-based learning, where he was an early pioneer--is becoming increasingly accepted and used by educators worldwide as the wave of the future.

Marc has published scores of essays and articles, and is the author of four books: Digital Game-Based Learning (McGraw-Hill, 2001), Don't Bother Me Mom - I'm Learning (Paragon House, 2006), Teaching Digital Natives: Partnering for Real Learning (Corwin, 2010) and From Digital Natives to Digital Wisdom (Corwin 2012). He was graduated cum laude from Oberlin College, holds Master's degrees from Yale University and The Harvard Business School with distinction, ran a charter school in East Harlem, NY, and has taught at all levels, from elementary to college.

Marc also performed on Broadway and at Lincoln Center, worked on Wall Street, and spent six years as a corporate strategist and product development director with the prestigious Boston Consulting Group. After his wide variety of experiences, he is thrilled to be back working in the field of education and learning.

Marc is a native New Yorker, where he lives with his wife Rie, a Japanese writer, and their son Sky, a thriving first-grader in the New York City public schools.

Customer Reviews

This book is excellent--well researched and beautifully written.
Sharon Sloane
Prensky's book is full of great information for anyone who is thinking about developing games to help train their staff.
David Strom
Much people don't finish the courses, don't read it really, cheat and a lot of things.
Rafael Lopez Callejon

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

42 of 44 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 3, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This book reads like a wired magazine article. Its envagelical tone betrays a decidely unacademic agenda. At times it feels like you are reading a brochure for Prensky's company rather than an objective evaluation of the capabilities and possiblities of Game-Based Learning. It rarely considers contrarian points of view and when it does, only in passing. That being said, it does contains some interesting ideas. Unfortunately, there are not enough ideas to warrant the book's heft, and the few ideas that it does contain are elaborated and repeated ad naseum. Prensky is unabashed by this and readily admits it in the intro: "You will find thoughout this book that many of the key ideas are repepated and illustrated in different ways and examples. This repetition is deliberate. Winston Churchhill counseled that "if you have an important point to make, don't try to be subtle or clever. Use a pile driver. Hit the point once. Then come back and hit it again. Then hit it a third time-- a tremendous whack ". It appears that this quote is more of a justification though than a reason because he later ironically criticizes such reduncacy in corporate training materials: "There was at one time a company that specialized in reducing the length of corporate tapes so they could be listened to more easily. They were typically able to get an hour's lecture or speech down to 10 or even 5 minutes of real content." I feel that the same could easily be said for this book through more aggressive editing. Furthermore, the various chapters often feel disjointed as if they were constructed as atomic articles (or pieced together from such), rather than as parts of an integrated whole. And I am generous in attributing the original source to articles.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 2, 2001
Format: Hardcover
The content would make a good magazine article because the author does make some good observations and recommendations -- but there isn't nearly enough content here for 400+ pages. I hope the games the author writes/produces aren't as boring and repetitious as parts of his book.
There are only a few poorly done illustrations, which I found puzzling given the visual nature of games. Instead of a lot of verbal hand-wringing about all the unwashed who "just don't get it" when it comes to the teaching power of games, a few compelling examples would have more impact.
Having built games for teaching and research in the corporate world, I wish the author had spent more time on how to build and maintain good games for really complicated topics. There are a few examples in the book of multi-million dollar military simulation games, but a lot of the other examples seem trivial when applied to genuine corporate needs.
Most striking about the examples from the corporate world, however, is the small number of successes and miniscule number of repeated successes. Those few souls who have built successful, non-trivial corporate training games appear to have a hard time repeating that success. This is not a good sign, but it's the hidden (and certainly unintended) message in the book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By I. Games on December 4, 2005
Format: Hardcover
When I first got this book, I was hoping to find a much needed argument in favor of the learning and educational benefits of games. Instead I found a lackluster series of marketing-like evangelisms that have neither valid science nor learning theory to back them up. By using a sales-pitch approach in an attempt to convince the reader, this book can do more damage than good to the field of educational videogame design and research. If one really wants to find out about what games have to tell us about learning, I would recommend Jim Gee's What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy book instead.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 7, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Always enjoyed the hardcoved edition (5 stars). Recently downloaded the Adobe Acrobat version and found it lacking the functions to efficiently read it on a mobile device with Acrobat Reader for Palm Devices. Publisher failed to tag the file to allow jumps from the Table of Contents to the referenced page. The pagination is also 18 pages off. I would not recommend the digital version if there are plans to read it with a mobile device.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Simon Egenfeldt-nielsen on July 23, 2006
Format: Paperback
Prensky's book had a great impact and have many good things in it, but one become annoyed by the lack of documentation, hype and comlete ignorance of much previous research. The subjectivity gives it a spark but in the (too) long book it becomes too much, getting in the way of solid arguments and evidence.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Michael Brim on January 4, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Looking at this book, and the price. You think that it's some type of scam to increase some type of video game's sales. But this is more like a Chicken Soup for the Gamers Soul. It tells many ways on how video games have educated people around the world. From foreigners learning how to speak English by playing English RPG's, to a kid who learned to drive by playing racing games.
Mr. Prensky demenstrates how all video games require some strategic planning in able to beat the game. That brings up creative thinking for the younger video game players.
This game lists off many reasons on why Video Games are NOT degrading, are NOT time wasting, along with many more reasons. The book got a star knocked off because the book doesn't stick to one main idea. It's a bunch of good, unique, brilliant ideas, however it's not a good idea to put two different unique idea's together. Not saying that this book should have came out in a series, but should have consisted of similar experiences in different chapters. The book covers a lot of bases, but not in a very professional way.
Some examples that were sent in by readers are available in the January 2001 issue of Nintendo Power at newstands now. To view those letters, turn to page 8, "Players Pulse".
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews