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154 of 157 people found the following review helpful
I used to get depressed with Image Transfer books, feeling like I needed to go out and buy myself a ton of new materials to be able to start dabbling. That is until I discovered Ellen Horovitz's book, Digital Image Transfer: Creating Art with Your Photography. Here's a book for every art room, with transfer techniques for every budget. Every possible material and supply combination seems to have been considered. Horovitz's book is quite different from the other books that I have encountered. I no longer feel that the right materials are just around the next corner. She's got me covered! In fact this book is so thorough, and generous with images, that it is very easy to follow! And it seems no matter what sort of digital image manipulation program we might use, no matter what sort of printer we might have access to, no matter what sort of materials we want to work with (from glass to polymer clay to leather and everything in between) we can get ideas for our work and we can actually start creating right away, even as we read!

One of my favorite chapters is the last one, which is a highly creative chapter that includes sections on Cyanotype creation, replicating an early printing process on natural fiber surfaces, instant film transfers, and byproduct art. "More often than not, artistic souls find the beauty in nearly everything that surrounds them, even in the discarded products from various transfer techniques!" Ellen says. And she's right.

Another great aspect of this book is that Horovitz has access to many very creative students who are very willing to explore and try out methods and materials in new ways, and I suspect willing to compete with one another to see how far they could take these techniques. They have tried the techniques in their classes and enhanced them, tweaked them, and run with them, and of course we benefit from what they have learned. The result is a book full of very exciting ideas and images (full color), illustrating the limitless possibilities of digital image transfer. The text is animated and a delight to read. I got the sense that being a student of Ellen Horovitz would be an extremely stimulating experience, but for those who can't take a class with Ellen in person, I would recommend this book as an inspiring consolation for any art room, art studio, or art therapy practice.
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51 of 53 people found the following review helpful
on January 19, 2012
I wish this book had been around years ago. it would have saved me countless dollars in products I didn't need or that failed. I totally agree with Lani Gerity Glanville's review!! Horovitz illustrates how to use everything from sophisticated software to household products to achieve professional results with photographic images. To boot, I have learned how to make wearable art from photographs that I never dreamed possible. I love my new dress that I made using Citra Solv, one of the products mentioned in this book. Thank you for this ground breaking book!!!
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40 of 41 people found the following review helpful
I stop short of giving Horovitz's book five full stars for a couple of reasons that I will detail below--but they are issues easy to overcome by most readers. Above all, this is a creative, inspirational text filled with usable techniques that you will want to try immediately!

In general Image Transfer provides a series of hands-on,step-by-step projects that allow artists to push digital imagery into off-screen compositions. Horovitz covers more methods for transferring inkjet images than most of the other books I've read on the subject and includes methods for applying images to wood, glass, metal and paper using a variety of solvents and materials. Though not is precision-oriented as some step-by-step texts, she provides enough working photographs for the artist to proceed.

The entire first chapter is devoted to a rather basic guide to creating digital imagery which I felt would be better served if she expanded it into a second book on the production of digital imaging through computer programs. As it stands, it was not useful to me (I already know how to do it--or else I wouldn't be buying the text to begin with) and it may not be detailed enough for someone who has never done it before. However, it took up little space in the book so is not really an issue.

Throughout the text, she encourages readers to be innovative, experimental and to embrace all manner of texture and surface, which is wonderful. She shows readers how to use ghost images, save transfer leftovers to be recycled into new pieces and even how to incorporate shrink plastic images into more traditional work. Her receptiveness to experimentation is what makes this a strong enough title to purchase, especially since many related books are more conservative in their approach.

Some of the chapters focus on materials that must be bought by a particular manufacturer (like Lazertran or Sheer Heaven). Others discuss home studio ways of making transfers using common art materials (gel medium, turpentine).

Because the book is practical, supportive of experimentation and allows for a lot of creative adaptation, I highly recommend it--especially to artists already familiar with digital imaging and image transfer.

I wish she would acknowledge the fact that what she is really doing is a form of printmaking--but she does little to bridge the gap in discussion between photography and printmaking. Just a really minor pet peeve of mine.

The downside:

Horovitz does not address studio safety often or well enough in the book. In some cases, she does not mention safety at all. As with any new process, do research on your own to determine the safety of a solvent or product. Look up MSDS sheets if you need to. Some of the materials she advocates are QUITE toxic, but can be safely used with proper measures.

For example, acetone and turpentine are associated with a number of confirmed toxic conditions. She does not mention the necessity to use exceptional ventilation, gloves and a respirator (if possible) with acetone. At least the use of gloves and good air circulation! Turpentine is the same way and many people experience shock reactions to the toxic fumes.

She never mentions the use of gloves, dust masks, GOOD ventilation (not just your large living room with the windows closed) and the possibility of respirators or fume masks (in extreme cases). The only reference to safety that I found was when she mentioned (as a photo caption) that you should make sure the area is well ventilated when you bake tape transfer onto plexiglass. She also briefly reminds the reader not to re-use measuring spoons you've dipped in turpentine.

Not trying to scare anyone away, because again, I do recommend this book for its solid, instructional and creative material. This is just a reminder that when you try ANY new technique, even if the book does not mention studio safety, take a peek in other books or at the web to learn ways to stay safe. I have seen a lot of instructional books on encaustic painting, for example, which completely ignore the toxicity of many of the pigments and fumes!

You can look up the studio safety information yourself, as a companion to this (and all!) books.

Edited to add:
I found one other occasion in the text where she mentions safety (briefly), in a section on CitraSolv. It only mentions having good ventilation, but does not stress the dangers of any other products, what good ventilation means, or the necessity of using gloves.
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41 of 44 people found the following review helpful
on January 23, 2012
Ellen Horovitz has written perhaps the quintessential book on photographic digital image transfer. Her writing and techniques are simple and straightforward, and geared to artists of all levels, whether professional or first-timers. Dr. Ellen has projects and ideas for every budget, with a vast variety of suggested resources, including everyday objects found right in your home. This is an enjoyable read as well as a "go to" guide and excellent reference. This book promises to be a great teaching tool for many years to come.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on March 22, 2012
This book is all what I was looking for. I am an artist and photographer who wanted to merge both techniques and tried a lot of things. When I read the book, the world opened for me as a new one artistically speaking. It is fun to read, easy to understand and techniques are really something. I have already produced two jobs with excellent results. Give it a go, you will never repent.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
on March 19, 2012
I have just started using Ms. Horovitz's book, Digital Image Transfer. The book is well organized with very clear step-by-step instructions. It is also illustrated with excellent images. Ellen Horovitz is also available for questions, which is very helpful.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on November 21, 2012
This book explains many ways to do image transfer on many types of surfaces. Easy to understand. Wish it had more step by step pictures.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on November 2, 2012
I have used this book very much. It has been a lot of help to me. Great images of all kinds!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on August 27, 2013
This is a good book for anyone wanting to learn digital image transfers and try new techniques and processes. Great for beginners.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on January 23, 2013
Beautifully illustrated book. Lots of ideas for me who is a beginner in this media. I would recommend for others.
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