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Digital Veil

March 8, 2011 | Format: MP3

$7.99
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
2:11
30
2
5:10
30
3
3:30
30
4
5:56
30
5
7:29
30
6
4:28
30
7
4:19
30
8
3:43
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Product Details

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Format: Audio CD
Technical Metal has come a long way over the past few years. Bands are starting to branch out into sub genre's within the Tech Metal camp and is truly allowing some excellent and interesting music make it to hard disc and become regular rotation on Heavy Metal airwaves. The Human Abstract have hit a home run with Digital Veil bringing a chaotic ambiance that at times is (at least for me) reminiscent of Cynic's latest release Traced in Air. Though what set's them apart is the strong Classical influence and the sheer heaviness that at points steps into the boundaries of Death/Black Tech Metal. All that said it is the band's ability to find a stable center point we're the heavy and more ambient sides can clash in glorious harmony.

Vocalist Travis Richter truly shows his worth as his deep guttural death growls bring rage to the heavier parts and yet his tranquil clean vocals bring a depth of humility to the harmonic chorus' and more tranquil tracks. With most Tech Metal groups two instruments stand out above all; Drums and Guitars. On Digital Veil I find that the guitars take the lead going from tapping to haunting acoustics at break neck speeds. I have to take note of the guitar work done on the second track 'Complex Terms' where we see a wide array of guitar styles and a great deal of technicality. Brett Powell puts down some intense fills through out the album and some of the finest cymbal work I've heard in some time I only think theirs a few moments on Digital Veil where his wrists get a break.

All and all Digital Veil has yet to leave regular rotation in my CD player and I doubt it will anytime soon.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I have been following this album very carefully since it's initial announcement. After their incredible debut, Nocturne, and their much less favorably received sophomore attempt, Midheaven, I wasn't sure what to expect from THA. Fortunately, the band knew where they needed to go, and have crafted the perfect album to bring them back to (and hopefully above) the level of recognition they received for Nocture. I am happy to say that this album is exactly what I wanted from THA--every single song is incredible (the stand-out here being the first single, Faust) and weaves an incredible mixture of classical and progressive metal influences. The musicianship of the band is out of this world (due largely to the return of guitarist A.J. Minette) and the songs are tightly crafted masterpieces.

The only real complaint to be made is about the album's length. Clocking in at just under 37 minutes, the 8 tracks fly by rather quickly. The good thing about this is that there is no filler to be found--every single track stands out. I wish the band hadn't released so many of the tracks before the album dropped, however. 5 of the 8 songs were released by the band before the album was out, making the new content short but sweet.

This album has certainly lived up to the hype; the return of A.J. Minette and the new voice of Travis Richter--a much more fitting vocalist for the band than the previous member, Nathan Ells--have brought this band to a new height. Digital Veil is everything I wanted and more, and a definite contender for album of the year 2011.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I'm picky about metal. I'm a big Gojira, Cynic, Lamb of God, Dillinger Escape Plan, BTBAM, (etc.) fan, but I always want to hear substantial melodic content with superb instrumentation. I won't listen to huge chunks of albums because bands so seldom pull it off. Everything about this album makes me happy - the guitar playing is gorgeous, the singing is melodic enough that I don't get a headache, the drumming is sweet, and the lyrics are intelligent.

This is the album I'm telling everyone to pick up!
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Format: Audio CD
The type of music that The Human Abstract play is an extremely progressive (and, thus, exceedingly technical) brand of hardcore, with some deathcore, grind, and mathcore elements mixed in. Through the use of jazzy tendencies and fluid melodic soloing, their songs are wildly inventive, original, and all over the map. And also as a result of thisk, T.H.A. end up coming across sounding heavily influenced by Cynic, From A Second Story Window, Psyopus, and most heavily, Between The Buried And Me.

The band's third album, 2011's "Digital Veil," is bookended by two beautifully progressive tracks, "Elegiac" and "Patterns," with the former being a mournful piano-based opener with soaring harmonies and melodies; and the latter being a gorgeous, strings `n' all ballad with lengthy melodic soloing and fantastic sweep picking. Stuffed in between are six very, very BTBAM-esque, shape-shifting songs that hop from brutal death metal to ethereal, prog rock balladry at the drop of a hat. Take "Complex Terms" for a definitive example of the album, as it juxtaposes harsh, abrasive, Black Dahlia Murder-like deathly growls with warm, nasal crooning, and furthers its sense of dynamics by filtering in some sweeping guitar soloing and a brief but noteworthy, piano-aided breakdown.

"Digital Veil" locks into pure grindcore territory with a straightforward groove and Meshuggah-esque chugging interlocked by punishing, thundering blast beats. Indeed, this song is definitely first-and-foremost a heavy one, but it does retain some melodies (which come in the form of guitar sweeps, epic melodic leads, and Necrophagist-inspired solos).
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