Customer Reviews


50 Reviews
5 star:
 (38)
4 star:
 (4)
3 star:
 (6)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


34 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Definitive Best Book On Paleoart -- Outstanding
This book collects virtually all of the best modern paleoartists into one spectacular volume. *Every* heavy hitter is here, and they range from digital artists to black and white "point" drawings; the publisher must have worked awfully hard to get so many top-notch artists into one volume. It is a definitive collection, and will probably remain THE definitive collection...
Published 22 months ago by Ulrich

versus
43 of 54 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Greatest? Not quite, still missing some of the greatest paleoartists
"Dinosaur Art". Excited to hear it and simultaneously I was put off by the simplicity of the title. Couldn't the author or publisher come up with something more imaginative? More all-encompassing considering there's more than just dinosaurs here? I know the reason - search engine purposes. Dinosaur Art is so broad it's bound to turn up and lure buyers.
To subtitle it...
Published 22 months ago by Coopernicus


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

34 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Definitive Best Book On Paleoart -- Outstanding, September 7, 2012
By 
Ulrich (Los Angeles, CA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Dinosaur Art: The World's Greatest Paleoart (Hardcover)
This book collects virtually all of the best modern paleoartists into one spectacular volume. *Every* heavy hitter is here, and they range from digital artists to black and white "point" drawings; the publisher must have worked awfully hard to get so many top-notch artists into one volume. It is a definitive collection, and will probably remain THE definitive collection of paleoart for many years. Not only are the artists all extremely skilled, they show considerable ingenuity in the scenarios they depict ... for example, two giant Quetzalcoatus defending their flamingo-like nest against a much smaller juvenile T. Rex. And all the art is consistent with and informed by the best current paleontological research. As mentioned by the other reviewer, the art is not limited to just dinosaurs, which is a plus, despite the title. There are also prehistoric mammals, tetrapods, and such.

If there is one negative, it's that you will probably have seen many of these images before, simply because this is a "greatest hits" package of paleoart. Therefore if you have previously spent any time reading books on paleontology that include great artwork, then you will have run across a number of these images before this collection. But there is so much content overall that you will surely have seen only a fraction of it. Not only is the art great, but the text is very interesting as well.

Fun fact: The cover picture with the crocodilian attacking the T. Rex is epic (which you can see in the Amazon picture), but if you take off the dust jacket, there is also underneath a rather amazing image of two silver dinosaur skeletons battling against a black background, all done in very technical and precise anatomical detail.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Buy It, November 22, 2012
This review is from: Dinosaur Art: The World's Greatest Paleoart (Hardcover)
Buy it.
Without reservation, buy it.

Not every illustration is excellent, and there is one I would describe as quite poor. However, most are absolutely outstanding and more than outweigh the (few) disappointing illustrations.
If you are even vaguely interested in paleontology, buy this book, the artwork gives a amazing new perspective on extinct life (not just dinosaurs).

One of the best books on ancient life I have encountered, a comment I make from the standpoint of quite a substantial collection of such books.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


43 of 54 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Greatest? Not quite, still missing some of the greatest paleoartists, September 20, 2012
This review is from: Dinosaur Art: The World's Greatest Paleoart (Hardcover)
"Dinosaur Art". Excited to hear it and simultaneously I was put off by the simplicity of the title. Couldn't the author or publisher come up with something more imaginative? More all-encompassing considering there's more than just dinosaurs here? I know the reason - search engine purposes. Dinosaur Art is so broad it's bound to turn up and lure buyers.
To subtitle it "The World's Greatest Paleoart" took some moxy considering with ten artists they just scratched the surface. Anyone thinking this is a critical overview or covers the comprehensive evolution of paleoart is mistaken. No such book exists (not even books by Rudwick, Davidson or Debus). This project was a paleofan's wish to compile his current favorite artists in one book, and probably have an excuse of speaking to them. So what you have is contemporary dinosaur art padded out with some basic Q & A.
I found the selection too Eurocentric. But what do you expect from a UK publisher? If you have wondered, where are the North American giants Mark Hallett? Larry Felder? James Gurney? Michael Skrepnick? Bill Stout? Karen Carr? Bob Walters? David Peters? Carl Buell? What about the Southern Hemisphere - Jorge Blanco? Peter Trusler? Some of these and others were approached by the author but there were space limits and disagreements about licensing/payments/royalties.
Let's hope a second volume can be produced with those or others, if Titan feels this one is successful. Dinosaur art books are always risky. Until then you have your Prehistoric Times interviews to fill in much of the same profiles.

Busy busy Phil Currie seems to be the first call paleontologist on these art books (see Dinosaur Imagery) and his foreword this time out seems generic, canned. No remarks are made about specific artists or their art, and nothing in it suggests he even saw so much as even a rough preview of this book.
Scott "Dino Train" Sampson was asked to write the introduction. It's clear he at least did review the book or the artwork.
Why Prehistoric Times' editor Mike Fredericks is credited is curious too. For an advance "thanks" for forthcoming praise/plugging in his magazine?

These are tinted versions of b/w Gregory Paul drawings we have seen in Paul's Predatory Dinosaurs of the World. The Jurassic scene is in front, the Cretaceous in back, but the credits say otherwise. I noticed some of the publication years are not right too. The resting Deinonychus pair at night, reprinted here fairly small, is listed as being from 1987 but it's from 1980. Historically that makes a difference.

Perhaps the scope of the book was narrower than I would have liked but I feel there should have been at least a bibliography listing books or works by the artist. Many books are cited throughout the interviews and it would have been a no-brainer to try to list these at the end. We do get a glossary and a timeline which was considerate. I wish that the author had compiled an index of dinosaurs by different artists which would have been helpful and a list of winners of the Lanzendorf award would have been a good historical document.

Only Sibbick, Henderson, Marshall and Martin offer up any preliminary sketches for comparison to the final product and they are very revealing. Henderson and Paul both still have their childhood dinosaur art. As I have seen some of these I personally think people would have gotten a kick out of them.
A comparison of the same genus on one page by different artists (something practiced in Prehistoric Times)would have been immensely useful.

The two page historical narrative overview lacks a comprehensive highlighting of breakthroughs in paleoart. Artists of the past like Neave Parker, William Scheele, Margaret Colbert, etc are not mentioned at all. Bakker's seminal running Deinonychus is not mentioned. No pictures of Knight, Burian, Zallinger and Matternes. All we get is the usual Waterhouse Hawkins Crystal Palace Iguanodon photo. That is the extent of the "history". Reading the history one would never know the contributions of Eleanor Kish - the first paleo painter of any merit since Burian, John Guche - the first photorealist dino artist, Bill Stout who arguably gave us the first true dino art book - and Mark Hallett - the man who coined this term 'Paleoart'.

Wisely the author admits the 'popular perception damage' movies like Jurassic Park and its ilk have caused. Today's generation have strong childhood memories of these films and many don't mind which is problematic to real workers in the field.

Onto the Artist Pages...
We don't get any but photos of the artists could have added value. Some of the author's questions get predictable ("why the move to digital?", "favorite dinosaur to restore?") especially considering the answers are mostly the same. Asked to cite influences, virtually all roads lead back to the original Dinosaur Renaissance men Robert Bakker and Greg Paul. The author could have probed certain artists put lips on dinosaurs, or "shrinkwrap" heads (where fenestrae in the skulls are overly defined as if it had mummified, sunken skin), for instance.

1 - Julius Csotonyi (Canada). I could see why - his answers are lengthy, passionate and deeply informed - particularly insightful on coloration theory. What a heavy hitter: academic credentials and digital mastery. (All you budding artists have your work cut out for you!) His dead Brachylophosaurus on a sandbar is one for the ages but I confess seeing the other mixed media/digital paintings were underwhelming. Some just don't work technically, some look just as phony as any oil painting.
2 - Gregory Paul (US) should have been first considering he is called the most influential of all the paleoartists. If you have Greg's coffee table art book or the Princeton Field Guide, then you pretty much have seen all the b/w and color pieces here. This book does not have some of Greg's best color work and the ones here are `flat' which is ok considering it's been seen before in other books. I know the double page dryosaurs are not well reproduced. If you want them in higher fidelity look in Greg's coffee table art book. The Chinese Shunosaurus/Gasosaurus scene in Dinosaur Art is marred by canvas/texture lines.
3 - Mauricio Anton (Spain) breaks up the dinomonotony (one reason the book should have been called something different.) The author calls Anton the leading artist of paleo mammals but Don Prothero or Carl Buell may disagree. Anton is amazing, a first tier artist. He eloquently explains how he came to concentrate on mammals instead of dinosaurs. His b/w work is soft and exquisite, rivaling that of his own color digital work. Unfortunately I found the double page reproductions poor quality. They just seem too murky. Anton's dinosaurs - not his strength - are not here, making this chapter feel out of place.
4 - Doug Henderson (US). Now here we have a case of an artist whose work we all probably have many times over in different books. I don't think there's any stuff you have not seen, save for a museum commission or two, if you have kept up with this ebay store prints. Seven pictures in this chapter are landscapes without dinosaurs or any prehistoric fauna at all. Henderson is pretty candid about the state of paleoart these days.
5 - Todd Marshall (US). Frankly I think Mark Hallett should have been right here. Todd's second tier work looks like movie concept art will either be broadly appealing or visually unappealing, and for me it's the latter. I can't wrap my head around those shrinkwrapped heads with tons of fuzz and integument, or the sloppy brushstrokes of his color work. Todd speaks as he renders (read; digressive) doesn't make much of backgrounds and heads and bodies are not equal in detail. It simply doesn't hold up as zoological illustration (Paul Sereno must have not found the *right* artist yet, as there's a revolving door of right hand men he has used over the years.) Todd's enthusiasm in his interview spills over into fanboydom with odd namedropping of heroes in cinema and rock and roll. A gaming designer by day, I was happy to see he agrees that traditional art is still the most satisfying.
6 - John Sibbick (UK). Say what you want about Sibbick being a great painter. The truth is no one worth their salt ever copied John's dinosaurs because they were never right to begin with. Greg Paul's most outdated work still looks good after 30 years but Sibbick's doesn't. Why is that? Because Sibbick, as with most of the 70s British dino artists, was never on the leading edge; he was very much an interpreter. And it's clear in this interview that he *knows* he was never a revolutionary, and never tried to be. All his dinosaurs have feet on the ground like nearly every outdated image of dinosaurs we can think of. He has been the guy that publishers love because his work looks like the dinosaurs they remember from childhood, plus there's no arguments with publishers from John. If publishers want bulbous, balloon dinosaurs, John always had them. He knows how to capture, albeit softly, every dewdrop, every accent of light, every leaf vein seems to be accounted for but the main stars of the piece - the dinosaurs -were always lacking. There's a misty fantasy element to his backgrounds. I am reminded of children's books illustrated by Rudolph Zallinger. In this book we only see Sibbick's latter day work that could easily be mistaken for Mark Hallett's. It's the non-dinosaurs which Sibbick has a bit more finesse with. Note that Peter Trusler is mentioned as one of his favorite modern artists - one of the best around - so where is he in this book? If you are a Sibbick fan, you will enjoy his oddly contorted Scelidosaurus maquette and sketches.
7 - Luis Rey (UK) comes across a tad revisionist, as if he was a late arrival to the Dinosaur Renaissance. When you come down to the facts he really he is Post-Renaissance (if you were published from 1975-1985 and "broke ground" you can call yourself part of it; I'd say David Peters was more present and contributed more in the late 80s than Rey.) Rey's trademark is relatively colorful, dare I say cartoonish. Rey's influence cannot be denied. A look around the net will turn up all manners of clownish looking paleoart. Compared to Csotonyi or Martin's work, Rey's mixed media has a ways to go. If familiar with his work you will recognize the same works from other publications. The skin texture on the throat area of Rey's Stegosaurus (2007) look too crocodilian. The scales on Triceratops are not what the fossilized skin show. The back porcupine quills - perhaps at his consultant Robert Bakker's request - look ludicrous. I predict eye and ear positions will be errant as well in future works if Bob is advising...
Rey claims he has virtually stopped collecting books for their dino art due to stagnation and overuse of effects (digital, presumably) in the form. However, his own style is a study in excess.
8 - John Conway (UK) sure likes his dinosaurs very Greg Paul-ian with very similar spaciousness, simplicity. His interview shows great humility as he is inching towards his own style.
9 - Robert Nicholls (UK) seems at home recreating marine environments. This chapter is easily the weakest part of the book. Compare the albertosaur attacked by Deinosuchus from Nicholls to Martin's (on the cover). I hate to say it but this is the type of art we see in secondtier paleo books.
10 - With Raul Martin (Spain) it seems that either the author or publisher both felt they saved the 'best' for last. Indeed it's Martin's art (recently used on a cover of Prehistoric Times) that made the cover. The hardships Martin felt in Spain developing his technique is expressed well. Ever the tough reporter, unless unaware, the author spares Martin the embarrassing questions about his plagiaristic past (check out a little bestseller called "National Geographic Dinosaurs" by Martin Barrett). A book like this should have been the ultimate place to apologize and clear his name. Martin admits he uses Greg Paul's skeletons and it's obvious in the few reproduced concept sketches. Martin has steered clear of restoring original scenes with stegosaurs, a question on why he has would have been intelligent. Martin seems very open and willing to share and his professionalism is not questioned. He will likely show up in many books of this ilk to come.

As much as some artists - both first and second tier - hate to admit as such - this book is yet another reminder that their road to restoration leads back to Greg Paul's drawings. Not what I hoped it would be contentwise it is still a handsome book and fun to look through.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful book, really nice, September 5, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dinosaur Art: The World's Greatest Paleoart (Hardcover)
This book is loaded with great, full color depictions of beautiful, sometimes stunning, artwork. This is a nice, detailed introduction a number of accomplished, extremely talented artists, with lots of examples of their (very good) work. The artwork is not limited to dinosaurs - it includes prehistoric reptiles, and there is a section with pretty incredible art by Mauricio Anton depicting prehistoric mammals. I just got the book, so I have not read all of the text (there are a lot of interviews with the artists, etc.), but even just a quick run-through tells me that if you enjoy looking at pictures of what these animals probably looked like (OK, colors are anybody's guess, but you have to decide on something), you will love this book - it is a great value just for the number and quality of the pictures alone.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Art, Many Styles, September 10, 2012
By 
W. Andrew Terrill (Carlisle, PA United States) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dinosaur Art: The World's Greatest Paleoart (Hardcover)
As noted by other reviewers, this artwork is both beautiful and diverse. Some of it is so realistic it almost appears photographic. Some is a little stiff, almost like a still life with dinosaurs. Other art included here verges on fantasy art with dinosaurs portrayed in deeply intense colors. There are also some terrific fold-out landscapes of prehistoric life. No one is going to like all of these styles equally, but anyone who enjoys the portrayal of dinosaurs and other prehistoric life should enjoy most of them. If you read a lot about dinosaurs, some of the images will be familiar, but I also realized that pictures I had seen in other books had often been truncated and I was now looking at the complete artwork. I am also delighted to see paleo-artists get some solid recognition. Most of the best modern artists of prehistoric life are represented here, and many of these people know as much about dinosaur anatomy as hard scientists. At least one of the artists has a sense of humor in naming his work (T-Rex Enjoying Seafood). I was also surprised at the very reasonable price for such a beautiful book. This belongs on the same shelf as Richard Milner's stunningly beautiful recent book on pioneering artist Charles R. Knight. [ASIN:0810984792 Charles R. Knight: The Artist Who Saw Through Time]]
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Beauty and a Treasure, December 17, 2012
By 
TheSpare617 "Jacy" (Greenville, MS USA) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dinosaur Art: The World's Greatest Paleoart (Hardcover)
This is quite simply a stunning book, full of gorgeous pictures. I liked that the emphasis of this book was not so much on the dinosaurs as it was on the people bringing them to life. We already have so many books out there telling us anything we could want to know about the animals themselves; it's always nice to get a feel for other aspects of paleontology (in this case, the people and processes involved in artistic reconstructions). I deeply admire all the artists presented, and think they are all excellent at what they do: my one criticism of the book is that I think it has a very poor representation of Luis V. Rey's work. I think he is an excellent artist, but the pieces here don't quite do him justice. I much prefer his pre-digital paintings, and a few of his pieces presented in the book actually look a little sloppy (a particular offender being the T-rex vs. Triceratops, where you can clearly differentiate some of the Photoshop layers, making it look like a cheap green-screen SFX). Overall though, I cannot sing enough praises of everyone involved in the making of this volume. Hopefully we get a second collection sometime in the near future that includes all the artist's who weren't able to fit this time around!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Dino Art book!, April 17, 2014
This review is from: Dinosaur Art: The World's Greatest Paleoart (Hardcover)
I absolutely love this book. It has clear photos and great art. Although I disagree with evolution, as is discussed in this book, I still would recommend this to anyone who loves art or dinosaurs. I, for one, love both.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Really enjoyable, February 7, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dinosaur Art: The World's Greatest Paleoart (Hardcover)
I first saw this at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural of Science this past December. I wanted it then, but was not willing to lug it back home with my airline carry on luggage...so I ordered it on Amazon. Sadly, Amazon emailed me with a notice that the book delivery would be delayed due to lack of availability and I began to regret not getting it in DC. After a long wait, I've had time to enjoy the book and am very glad I did not cancel the order!

The book is well bound, the paper and printing are very high quality. The artwork is fabulous and the thoughtful interviews with the artists make the book a joy to come back to again and again.

eBooks are great, and convenient...but this book pulled off the shelf with a comfortable chair is why there will always be books! I understand now why this was in short supply, causing the long wait my copy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book, January 12, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dinosaur Art: The World's Greatest Paleoart (Hardcover)
Full of beautiful and a fair amount of information. Got this mostly for my kids who love dinosaurs (but I do as well). Would recommend.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book!, January 9, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dinosaur Art: The World's Greatest Paleoart (Hardcover)
Got this for my son for Christmas, and he just loves it!! The pictures are awesome, the book is well worth the money!! I would recommend this book to anyone!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Dinosaur Art: The World's Greatest Paleoart
Dinosaur Art: The World's Greatest Paleoart by Steve White (Hardcover - September 4, 2012)
$34.95 $24.71
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.