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Dinosaur Trouble Hardcover – March 18, 2008


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 7 - 10 years
  • Grade Level: 2 - 5
  • Hardcover: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Roaring Brook Press; First Edition edition (March 18, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1596433248
  • ISBN-13: 978-1596433243
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 6.3 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #742,217 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Nosy, a newly hatched pterodactyl, emerges from his shell peppering his mother with questions. From her answers he quickly learns a number of big words about himself: nidifugous, pterodactyl, pulchritudinous, and nomenclature. And that’s just in the first four pages. His utter faith in his mother’s wisdom falters when he spies a young apatosaurus by the river, whom his mother dismisses as a second-class creature. (At the same time, the apatosaurus mother calls the pterodactyls much inferior to us.) Nosy seeks out the dino anyway, and the two eventually unite their families. Together they devise a plan to end the Tyrannosaurus rex’s reign of terror and have more success than anticipated. Much of the book’s humor relies on wordplay and the juxtaposition of the clever mothers next to their dim-witted husbands. Frequent black-and-white cartoon illustrations, both inset and full page, enliven the text and add a light comic tone. Complex vocabulary and sentence structure make this book a good fit for advanced young readers or as a read-aloud. Grades 2-4. --Suzanne Harold

Review

Booklist
Nosy, a newly hatched pterodactyl, emerges from his shell peppering his mother with questions. From her answers he quickly learns a number of big words about himself: nidifugous, pterodactyl, pulchritudinous, and nomenclature. And that’s just in the first four pages. His utter faith in his mother’s wisdom falters when he spies a young apatosaurus by the river, whom his mother dismisses as a “second-class creature.” (At the same time, the apatosaurus mother calls the pterodactyls “much inferior to us.”) Nosy seeks out the dino anyway, and the two eventually unite their families. Together they devise a plan to end the tyrannosaurus rex’s reign of terror and have more success than anticipated. Much of the book’s humor relies on wordplay and the juxtaposition of the clever mothers next to their dim-witted husbands. Frequent black-and-white cartoon illustrations, both inset and full page, enliven the text and add a light comic tone. Complex vocabulary and sentence structure make this book a good fit for advanced young readers or as a read-aloud. — Suzanne Harold
 
School Library Journal
Nosy is a young pterodactyl and Banty is a young apatosaurus. Both of their families are scornful of the other and try to instill their distain in their offspring. After all, pterodactyls are superior because they can fly. And apatosaurus are better because they have four legs and are herbivores. In spite of their parents’ objections and their obvious differences, the two young dinosaurs become friends and help unite their families in the face of a common foe–a T. rex named Hack the Ripper. The lessons about friendship, working together, and not prejudging others are not subtle, but the story is engaging and fun and readers will not mind the messages. Children are also likely to learn new words as Nosy’s mother speaks with a highly inflated vocabulary. “We are, after all aeronauts of remarkable facility and versatility.” Luckily, most of her words have to be explained/translated for the other dinosaurs. The black-and-white spot art captures the characters’ expressions and, with the exception of the T. rex, appears almost sweet. The story is a good choice for dinophiles who have moved beyond picture books and are ready for easy chapter books.–Kelly Roth, Bartow County Public Library, Cartersville, GA
 
Kirkus Reviews
Replacing his usual stock of farm animals with an older, more primitive cast, King-Smith pits families of Pterodactyls and Apatosaurs against a predatory T. rex. After ignoring the species prejudice of their parents to strike up a friendship, leather-winged newborn Nosy and hulking Banty (short for “Bantamweight,” which she is when compared to her mother and father) come up with a daring plan to drive toothy Hack the Ripper out of the area. Their intellectually pretentious Moms and dimwitted Dads are initially reluctant but eventually agree to pitch in—and it all works out even better than expected. In Bruel’s frequent cartoon scenes and vignettes, the players display a supple solidity as they smile, scowl or look confused according to their assigned roles. The unusual setting and mild suspense of this celebration of interspecies cooperation will draw in recent easy-reader graduates. The addition of multi-syllabic dinosaur names and Latinate vocabulary words add extra appeal.

More About the Author

Dick King-Smith was a farmer for twenty years before becoming a writer, and most of his animal stories are based on his farming experiences. He won the Guardian Award with The Sheep-Pig, which became the blockbuster film Babe. Dick lives in Gloucestershire.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By BostonReader on July 14, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My son, age 4, loves this book. We've read it together twice already. The dialogue is very funny, and the plot has enough twists and turns to keep the pages turning. He didn't find it too scary and really loved how the little dinosaurs used their brains to overcome the T. Rex. He also loved picking up the long words.
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By MamaS on October 5, 2014
Format: Paperback
Got this book because we are introducing longer "chapter books" to our 5- and 3-year-old. The 5-year-old likes dinosaurs, and we're also a fan of the Babe movies (based on King-Smith's other work,) so I thought it might be good. As another reviewer pointed out, the violence might be too much for a sensitive child. I was not averse to the idea of herbivores tangling with a T-Rex, but what I didn't like was the gore in the descriptions of these encounters. Completely unnecessary. Found myself skipping over and changing lots of lines. Also, there was a lot of talk about pooping. And not in a funny way - more crass. I can see how the story attempts to promote vocabulary growth. Perhaps for a young reader in older grades (3rd/4th grade) this book would be alright. There is quite a lot of dialogue that sort of gets lost when read aloud. It is not appropriate as a read-aloud for preschool/kindy-aged kids. Even though 5-year-old seems to like it (with my omissions of various dialogue and passages), I am taking this off of our shelf.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mom 2002 on June 23, 2010
Format: Hardcover
This book is just the right reading level for my son at the end of his second grade year. He is ready to move on from The Magic Tree House books, and this book has just enough new vocabulary and pictures for him.

PROS: Introduces vocabulary in an interesting way. Teaches that you may like those who are different from you once you get to know them.
CONS: Kid/baby dinosaurs disobey parents. Father dinosaurs are portrayed as unintelligent. T-Rex attack and murder scenes are way too scary for my son.

After reading most of the way through this book, my 7-year-old son refused to read the rest of it. He is generally sensitive to scary scenes, but usually will continue if I read ahead and tell him what to expect. However, he found this story line to be too frightening and was too scared to finish.
Kids who are not sensitive will probably do just fine with this book and may even enjoy reading about the T-Rex getting crushed by a huge tree.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My husband and I read this book aloud to our 4 year old. My husband and I didn't particularly like the story, but our dinosaur obsessed son loved it! I liked that it exposed him to a ton of new words and it held his attention.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Shannon on May 2, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I bought this book for my toddler as a way to introduce 'chapter books' and it wasn't at all what I had expected based on the reviews I read. The dinosaur's names are difficult for even me to pronounce and the content at times can be a bit harsh. Truth be told we haven't even finished reading it, so perhaps it does get better...
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