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3.9 out of 5 stars
The Dip: A Little Book That Teaches You When to Quit (and When to Stick)
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Showing 1-10 of 28 reviews (1 star)show all reviews
38 of 40 people found the following review helpful
on November 28, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I read the entire book, and feel it could have been a great book if it deliver on the promise of the title of knowing when to quit and knowing when to stick with something. It does not. The Dip is about the place between the exciting new start of something, and the slump before mastery, or what Godin says "Being the best in the world."

This book in my opinion is in the dip. It had a good start, but is far, far from being the best in the world on this important life changing subject. What the book needed badly is tools for evaluating when you should quit and when you should stick it out. This book felt like more of a rant then a serious study from an expert on the subject who has real life experience or who has worked through the process with a good number of people and learned effective tools to share with others.

It seem like Godin quit while still in the dip with writing this book. Maybe he should have followed his own advise and stuck it out and created something great, or quit before he published this book.
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192 of 227 people found the following review helpful
on May 27, 2007
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
OK, I keep buying Godin's books expecting more. But, all I get is content that seems like a well constructed blog posting. Seth is a very good writer and communicator, but this book added zero to my life. It is a very short book about quitting stuff you're not good at and sticking with (or starting) things you're not good at. Life is short. The longer you dwell in mediocrity, the longer it will take you to become exceptional. Contrary to the book's claim, it doesn't really teach you WHEN to quit or when to stick...other than when the goal is worthwhile. Such an examination takes more than just reading some words. There is very little thought-provoking content here. It seems like a summarized rip-off of Marcus Buckhingham and the "strengths" books...which are excellent and unlike this book...may change your life. Godin is well respected in marketing, but how many more collections of blogs (small is the new big), other people's works (purple cow), and short discourses about the obvious can he keep putting out? It's like people who compile ezines.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
on February 4, 2011
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
I expected a lot more from this book. I ended up receiving some common sense advice that I already know. The title implies that this book will teach you when to quit and when to stick with something by visualizing a dip, a cul-de-sac and a cliff. The idea is that you should consider when to work through a dip but you should quit when you hit a cul-de-sac or cliff if you can't turn them into dips because they are dead ends and they lead to nowhere.

I'm 27 and I already know when it's time to cut my losses and move on and when it is worth sticking with something because the end result will be beneficial to me. I think most of you might already know this too. I think you figure this out as you get older with experience. I was hoping this book would teach me something beyond that.

I could not find any rhythm in this small book and I didn't come away from it with any new advice or insights. Godin also keeps talking about being #1. He says to quit if you can't become #1. I mean, we all want to be #1 but sometimes you don't have to be #1 to be satisfied or successful. I didn't get where he was going with quitting as it relates to being #1. This idea probably only applies to certain areas where being #1 means survival. Personally, I want to go to med school and become a doctor. I am not going to quit just because I can't find a cure for cancer.

On page 64, there is a quote that pretty much sums up the whole book. It says: "Never quit something with great long-term potential because you can't deal with the stress of the moment." That pretty much sums up the book and the idea of dips and cul-de-sac's. I would have given this book five stars if it could explain how to differentiate between things worth quitting and things worth sticking with.

This book could have benefited from more examples of real life dips and HOW and if you should go through them. For example, Godin talks about how organic chemistry is a dip for pre-med students. His explanation of this dip is that if you don't get through organic chemistry, you will not go to medical school. As a pre-med student, I already know this. It would have been nice if Godin explained when it is worth sticking with orgo and when you should give up on it and pursue something else. He just makes a pretty obvious observation and then leaves you hanging with no explanation.

Also, unless I missed something, the book also never explained how to turn a cul-de-sac into a dip.

Bottom line is this: Dips are natural, we all experience different dips in our lives. Some dips turn into cul-de-sacs and cliffs and vice-versa. Some dips however, are worth the effort of sticking out because of the potential end result. This is not a new idea. You already know this and you get better at evaluating this as you get older with experience; I don't think somebody else can explain the dips in your own life. Dealing with the dips in your life has to do with your motivation. If you are a highly motivated individual, you will understand dips better than someone who is unmotivated. Since I think dips are related to motivation and understanding a dip is common sense, I suggest you skip this book and by any one of the many self-help motivational titles out there.

Seth Godin is a pretty popular guy so I'm surprised that I didn't like this book. I would suggest you borrow it first but there's really nothing groundbreaking here and the book was a slow read. I know one star is pretty harsh but considering the price and what you will come away with after reading it, I thought it was appropriate.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on December 12, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This book is unspired and is made of old information. The content seems to be a patchwork of Mr. Godin's blog posts. Feel that I may have been duped into buying this when the info is old and redundant.
I like Mr. Godin and believe that he has some tidbits of wisdom but this book is over-hyped and a poor offering.
The themes are weak, the case studies are typical[Google, Wikipedia, every other internet buzz word] and there are no revelations.
Not worth the time or money.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Format: Hardcover
I hadn't read any of Seth Godin's other books but to be honest, after reading this one I don't think I will. As an entreprenuer, I was anxious to read this book to see what hidden secrets Seth uncovered, but was disappointed to find a confusing and extremely repetitive text. One of the other comments on Amazon got it right - how it is possible to have so little useful information in such a little book. I would highly recommend the 4 Hour Work Week in place of this one.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on November 10, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Having heard the name Seth Godin repeatedly and having read some of his blog posts, I was given this book to read. I wasn't looking for a motivational book, but boy was I disappointed.

This comes across as someone writing for writings sake. The ideas are simplistic and obvious and unoriginal - his concept of The Dip is not unlike the The Chasm proposed by Geoffrey Moore.

The basic take home of this book is: It's no good being average, you need to be the best, and to be the best you need to know when to push through the dip (i.e. difficulties and obstacles) and when to quit.

I wish Seth had taken his own advice and left motivational type books to those who could be the best at writing them. The references are shallow and the arguments lack insight and practical advice on how to effect the change. This reads as a long blog post lacking in substance and written to meet some sort of scheduled output target. I couldn't even force myself to finish it.

Save the trees - this isn't worth the paper it is printed on.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on August 22, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
Under-researched, under-developed and underwhelming. While I have enjoyed some of Seth Godin's earlier work, mainly for his quirky take on the more egregious kinds of marketing, this really is short on content, originality and utility. Not a "how to", certainly not a scholarly or even particularly thoughtful treatise on quitting and sticking. His assertions are not backed up by any reputable studies, even serious case studies of his own. No bibliography or references whatsoever. Dogma in wolf's clothing. Read it if you're stuck between metro stops or have ADD.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on March 21, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Don't buy. A brobdignagian waste of money. It's not a book, it's an essay. That is, it's extremely short. Moreover, what little there is of it consists entirely of repackaged obviousness. Repeated over an over in order to simulate an essay which should never have been a book. In its entirety, it says only three things:

1. Things that are worth doing are hard
2. Not everything that's hard is worth doing.
3. It behooves us to figure out the difference.

Who doesn't know this?
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on August 7, 2007
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
is not very common that a very little book can repeat itself so much, somehow though this one succeeds. winners quit, quitters lose, losers quit, go on and do all the permutations possible, mix in the word "dip", scratch your head and state that is important to get into the "dip" and go through when it matters. good advice, thanks a lot.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on December 22, 2007
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
This book was very simple, yet it didn't convey a complete idea.
It didn't teach me anything about when to quit. It described a Dip and a Cul-de-Sac and said to get out of a Cul-de-Sac, and know when to power through a Dip and when to recognize when it's a waste of time.
I kept reading, and waiting for the point to be made with relavant examples, but they never came.
I asked someone else to read it for her opinion, without expressing mine, and she said the same thing.
Although it's short and a quick read, I feel like it was a waste of time.
I do not recommend. If you've read this review, you don't have to read the book - you've already got the concept!
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