The Direction of Time (Dover Books on Physics) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.95
  • Save: $2.69 (18%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by SammysBookshop
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Book conatins some very minor shelf wear. Everything else is perfect. Orders Are Packed & Shipped, Safe & Fast.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Direction of Time (Dover Books on Physics) Paperback – July 2, 1999


See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.26
$7.45 $5.00

Frequently Bought Together

The Direction of Time (Dover Books on Physics) + The Philosophy of Space and Time (Dover Books on Physics)
Price for both: $16.25

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Series: Dover Books on Physics
  • Paperback: 292 pages
  • Publisher: Dover Publications (July 2, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0486409260
  • ISBN-13: 978-0486409269
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #833,556 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Hans Reichenbach was professor of philosophy at UCLA and one of the leading thinkers in the logical empiricist school of philosophy. Maria Reichenbach translated and edited many of her husband's works first written in German. Hilary Putnam, Professor of Philosophy at Harvard University, is author of Meaning and Moral Sciences (1978), and, most recently, Realism with a Human Face (1990).
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Matthew T. Haley on July 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
If you didn't know, this book is hard. I am a first year engineering student, and I felt lost through most of it. I gather it was intended for full-fledged physicists, but I was intrigued to read it anyway because of a philosophical thread running through the work. But beware--get ready for some Immanuel Kant and Einstein in only the introduction. This book is as much about the physics of time as the philosophy concerning subjectivity of time. Even though I didn't understand a lot of the probability or almost any of the quantum mechanics math, I still got some pleasure out of some of the more bizzare conclusions of the book. Did you know that for an isolated system (one not interacting with any others), time can't be said to have any direction? Furthermore, time as we know it is just a statistic. Another interesting fact is that on the quantum mechanical level, there is no such thing as time! If these things intrigue you (and you know what a double Riemann sum is) go for this book. Otherwise, be very afraid...
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Muzaffer Muctehitzade on March 24, 2001
Format: Paperback
It is a beautiful but exterememly difficult book. It covers the concept of time and direction of time from the beginning up to current thinking. Author, being one of the founding fathers of philosophical quantum theory first introduces a good understanding of Thermodaynamics and Statiastical Physics and defines the order of events to lead into statistical definition of arrow of time. A lot of difficult concepts from Classsical Statistical Physics, Probability Theory, Relativity and Mathematical Logic as well as a good understanding of Quantum Physics is assumed to be in the bag of the reader, after all this book is not a Popular Science book. Although the author claims that knowledge of derivations of the formulas used are not critical to understand this study yet time to time the language and logic becames exteremely difficult. This is a must read book in this subject, may be many times or time and time over after increasing the understanding in other subjects that only tools in this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Matt Simkins on May 30, 2007
Format: Paperback
I can't believe that everyone didn't rate this with 5 stars!

I had to write this because this was one of those really great books that changed my understanding of something that seems so basic, so obvious, time.

Well well worth the 5 bucks.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Christine C. Dantas on June 15, 2011
Format: Paperback
"The Direction of Time" is an important contribution on the nature of time, based on an advanced draft left by H. Heinchenbach after his death in 1953. The manuscript was published posthumously as a self-contained book, thanks to the care and attention of his wife, M. Heichenbach, who edited the manuscript for publication.

The book is divided into five chapters, namely: (1) introduction (basically, on the emotive significance of time); (2) the time order of mechanics; (3) the time direction of thermodynamics and microstatistics; (4) the time direction of macrostatistics; and (5) the time of quantum physics.

A final chapter for the book was planned by the author, summarizing a relation between subjective time (experienced by humans) and the objective time (as given by the formal analysis of physical time presented in the book). Unfortunately, the author died before being able to finish that final chapter. The editor was careful, however, to add an appendix outlining possible directions, based on a related paper by the author, published in 1953.

The book is basically a summary of the author's lifetime contributions to the problem of time, from the point of view of philosophy and physics. In particular, the author is very attentive to clarify as much as possible any philosophical inquiries with logical argumentation and to never loose sight of which mathematical models, based on known physics, can actually bring consistency to the discussion (with the exception of the first chapter, which is purely philosophical throughout).

The book is very clearly written, and any obscurities (there are some, in fact) are mainly due to the difficulty of the subject matter itself, not of his discourse. It is not, for that matter, a popularization book.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?