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Dirt

September 29, 1992 | Format: MP3

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: January 1, 1992
  • Release Date: September 29, 1992
  • Label: Columbia
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 57:27
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0014KA0EG
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 547 customer reviews
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,376 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Alice In Chains sophomore album "Dirt," stands as the band's most popular and most critically acclaimed album. "Dirt" stands alongside Nirvana's "Nevermind", Pearl Jam's "Ten" and Soundgarden's "Badmoterfinger" as an essential album of the grunge era. Much like "Ten" "Badmoterfinger" and "Nevermind," "Dirt" was an album that many inferior bands, i.e., Godsmack, borrowed from. Although the Seattle group was categorized as a grunge band, they were also distinctly a metal band, although they did write a fair amount of acoustic material.

"Dirt" is one of the most powerful, genuinely harrowing, intense, depressing albums of all-time. Some singers are very contrived and put on an act, a fake pain or rage (like Gavin Rosdale or Fred Durst). But with "Dirt," when you listen to these songs, you can hear the pain in singer Layne Staley's voice. These songs were written by someone who was at absolute rock bottom. The themes of the album-drug addiction, loss, depression, regret, nihilism, hopelessness, come across as so real that this album is somewhat difficult to listen to. What makes this album especially sad is the knowledge that Staley would eventually succumb to his drug addiction.

Although the nature of this album and its frontman is heartbreaking, there is no denying the greatness of the band and these songs. Layne Staley and guitarist Jerry Cantrell were one of the best, if not best, guitar/singer teams from the 90s. The 60s had Jagger/Richards, the 70s had Perry/Tyler, the 80s had Slash/Rose, and the 90s had Staley/Cantrell.

Staley's voice is eerie, powerful, and hauntingly beautiful. It's not so much the dark lyrics that make these songs so powerful, it's the way Staley delivers them. These songs sound lived in.
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Format: Audio CD
I don't even want to know how many times I've listened to this album, all the way through, and then when it was over played it again. This was the first I ever heard Alice in Chains (thanks to my cousin playing "Rooster" for me) and I immediately put the album on my NEED TO BUY list back in early 1994. Being forbidden MTV by my parents and really having no previous interest in radio this album sparked my love of music into a virtual inferno! This was the first cd I ever bought, and for that alone I love it. But all the songs are a powerful offspring of potent lyrics and chillingly talented musicians. Jerry Cantrell's playing is surreal and Layne Staley's singing is startling enough to puncture the soul. The first song "Them Bones" is one of my favorites, highly introspective. The second, "Dam That River" is an excellent play on words. "Rain When I Die" is haunting enough to put on repeat itself. "Down In A Hole" is a sad, self-aware song that screams for the memorization of its lyrics and pertinence when just a little bit down. "Sickman" took me awhile to like, (maybe 3 seconds as opposed to the instantaneous reaction I had to the previous 4 songs) but is now a staple of my music listening experience. "Rooster" well, this is what started it all for me. I don't think I'll ever get sick of listening to this song and I've even been known to tell people to shut the hell up while it's playing on the radio. "Junk Head" is blatantly about drug use and about criticising things and people alike without bothering to find out both sides. "Dirt" the song for which the album is named has a really crazy sound to it and is like a mid-album spike into a harder tone.Read more ›
1 Comment 75 of 83 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Audio CD
Alice in Chains is sorely missed. They certainly left their mark on the nineties - I really can't think of a better heavy metal band. This album, Dirt, is their major artistic statement. And Layne Staley, their lead singer, certainly has more than his share of demons to exorcise. Except Alice in Chains never lapses into pompous, self-absorbed angst like Nine Inch Nails or the Smashing Pumpkins. Staley's voice perfectly conveys the despair he sings about, and its grittiness and roughness only serves to enhance the feeling.
It is said that this album is mainly about Staley's heroin abuse. Assuredly some songs are - "God smack" and "Junkhead" are obvious ones. Others may have nothing to do with drugs at all, but still maintain the mood of despair of a hopeless, almost lifeless addict. Despite all that, Staley's voice and his tone of resignation often has almost a comforting effect - this is one of the best albums to help one through depression. To be sure, this album has quite a few really rockin' rockers - "God smack", "Dam that River", etc., but it also has subtlety. An enduring quality pervades many songs, even where it has no place - "Rooster" is about an American soldier, about to be killed by a Vietnamese sniper, completely outgunned, and yet when the song's done the listener gets a hopeful feeling, as if he'd just heard a survival story. The album ends with the menacing, soul-wrenching "Would?", which still carries the same, almost foolhardy feeling of hope. The best moments are "Rain When I Die", "Down in a Hole", and the aforementioned "Rooster" and "Would?".
One final note - it seems that a bunch of people like to put down AiC and call them a "Godsmack ripoff".
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