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My Dirty Little Book of Stolen Time: A Novel Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA (July 11, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1596911883
  • ISBN-13: 978-1596911888
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.9 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,022,952 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

When 25-year-old Charlotte Schleswig begins telling her madcap tale in 1897, she's a successful prostitute roaming the suburban streets near Denmark's capital. A random meeting in a bakery leads her to begin working as a domestic for Fru Krak, an anxious woman whose husband has recently disappeared under mysterious circumstances and who may now be haunting the very streets Charlotte walks. Charlotte soon sets out to find the missing Professor Krak, and in the course of her investigations discovers 21st-century London, a whole new world of mobile phones, microwaves, flavored condoms, suicide machines and a handsome archeologist named Fergus. Jensen (The Ninth Life of Louis Drax) satisfactorily coats a predictable romance with a shiny time-traveling sci-fi glaze, mixes a dash of irony and suspense, and pushes it all through Charlotte's energetic first person, which carries the book. The final result is fun and sometimes scintillating, but not necessarily delicious—like a flavored condom. (July)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

Praise for THE NINTH LIFE OF LOUIS DRAX: 'Liz Jensen's new novel has already been picked up by Anthony Minghella for a film adaptation. It's hardly surprising: this is a wonderfully unsettling psychological thriller An oddly beautiful journey into the darkest corners of the human soul' Mail on Sunday 'Liz Jensen has created an extraordinary character in the shape of Louis Drax: vivid, disquieting and blessed with a gloriously sick sense of humour a magnetic read that will delight and disturb in equal measures' Daily Mail 'The Ninth Life of Louis Drax has all the makings of a dramatic, suspenseful bestseller a novel that demands to be finished in one sitting' Observer 'Liz Jensen's latest book is emotionally compelling, morally fascinating and slightly appalling The result is breathtaking.' Independent on Sunday --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Peter D. Tillman VINE VOICE on November 9, 2006
Format: Hardcover
This is a cheerfully-bawdy romantic time-travel fantasy, set in 19th-century Copenhagen and 21st-century London. The time-travel device (in both senses) is cartoonish (but fun). Jensen writes well and has done her homework. The protagonist is a hooker with a heart of gold (OK, gilt), which shows once again that a good writer can recycle the hoariest cliche into Good Stuff. Fluff, but *good* fluff.

Happy reading,

Peter D. Tillman
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By cordeliaknits on September 29, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I loved this book! It was witty, smart, sometimes silly, and suspenseful. It was like an engaging children's book for adults. If you are looking for a book that will keep you interested and smiling throughout, I reccommend it highly.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Jevons & Hollerith Books on May 20, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Best to start by quoting a paragraph from the Paul Di Filippo review of Liz Jensen works in the July 2007 issue of "Asimov's Science Fiction" magazine:

"Jensen is not marketed as a genre author, nor reviewed in genre venues. And she doesn't exactly rate big coverage from mainstream, establishment publications, either--a result, I believe, of her slipstream nature, and her consequent falling in between two camps. And she's British, which, sadly, often militates against a wider audience in the USA. (I suspect, based on the praise-filled British blurbs for her books, that she's got a much higher profile in her native land.) These factors make it unlikely that Asimov readers will have a deep familiarity with her work. And that's a darn shame, given her superb prose, witty fantastical conceits, narrative drive, and mature sophistication."

Based on this suggestion from a knowledgeable source, I tried Dirty Little Secrets -- her latest work -- and liked it enough to hunt up copies of Egg Dancing (1995), Ark Baby (1998), The Paper Eater (2000), War Crimes for the Home (2002), and The Ninth Life of Louis Drax (2004).

Is it science fiction? fantasy? something else entirely? Your guess is as good as Filippo's; who cares -- a marzipan storyteller.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. McCaf on June 1, 2007
Format: Hardcover
The beginning of this story held so much promise. A prostitute from the 1800's and her mom (?) find a time machine in the basement of the home where they are supposedly working as housekeepers and go to 21st century London. There they find the supposedly dead husband of their employer and other people from their time, who time traveled rather than commit suicide. However, once in London and the 21st century, the novel dissolves into a love story and becomes like many other romance novels. Sigh. However the writing was very good and there were enough interesting and funny little items in the book to make me finish it even though I knew where the plot was going.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jevons & Hollerith Books on May 23, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Best to start by quoting a paragraph from the Paul Di Filippo review of Liz Jensen works in the July 2007 issue of "Asimov's Science Fiction" magazine:

"Jensen is not marketed as a genre author, nor reviewed in genre venues. And she doesn't exactly rate big coverage from mainstream, establishment publications, either--a result, I believe, of her slipstream nature, and her consequent falling in between two camps. And she's British, which, sadly, often militates against a wider audience in the USA. (I suspect, based on the praise-filled British blurbs for her books, that she's got a much higher profile in her native land.) These factors make it unlikely that Asimov readers will have a deep familiarity with her work. And that's a darn shame, given her superb prose, witty fantastical conceits, narrative drive, and mature sophistication."

Based on this suggestion from a knowledgeable source, I tried Dirty Little Secrets -- her latest work -- and liked it enough to hunt up copies of Egg Dancing (1995), Ark Baby (1998), The Paper Eater (2000), War Crimes for the Home (2002), and The Ninth Life of Louis Drax (2004).

Is it science fiction? fantasy? something else entirely? Your guess is as good as Filippo's; who cares -- a marzipan storyteller.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 13, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Moving from nineteenth century Copenhagen to twentieth century London at a lightening speed, and in ways you won't believe, author Liz Jensen's My Dirty Little Book of Stolen Time is a bawdy, lewd and stench-fuelled frolic through the centuries, it's pages chock-a-block full of prostates, professors, and old crones all vying for prominence with stately old mansions, creaky time machines and uncanny societies.

With a plot that moves at break-neck speed, Jenson has written a novel where the language is always vulgar and colourful and where the characters never seem to relax and take a breath. In other words, it's a time-traveling adventure tale and a love story, and fabulously decadent, romp, immersing the reader in the underbelly of Copenhagen's scoundrels whilst also transporting us to the behind-the-scenes present day intrigues of the "Tin City" of London.

Living in Copenhagen and working as a prostitute, Charlotte, the heroine of novel is existing hand to mouth, her livelihood fuelled by the furtive needs of men, so when meets the haughty and stuck-up widow, Fru Krak, she sees a very advantageous door opening for herself. Krak's husband has been missing for quite a few years and she is about to remarry. Desperately needing a maid to clean her dilapidated and neglected mansion, Krak invites Charlotte into her employ.

With the "decrepit old crone" Fru Schleswig - whom she is generous enough to support and who she maintains is "not her mother" - she begins her life as the servant of the sour-faced & foolishly gullible Fru Krak, a new life shaken only by a disquieting visit she makes to the former housekeeper Gudren Olsen who reportedly once had a terrible scare regarding the Krak household.
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