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 (Disambiguation) (Deluxe Edition) [+Digital Booklet]

(Disambiguation) (Deluxe Edition) [+Digital Booklet]

November 9, 2010

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Digital Booklet: (disambiguation)
Album Only


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: November 9, 2010
  • Release Date: November 9, 2010
  • Label: Solid State Records (SST)
  • Copyright: (C) 2010 Solid State Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 50:05
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0047K7HOG
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #92,412 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

One of the best Underoath albums ever.
Lewis
Overall: This album is very different from their previous releases, but it's still amazing.
J. Aardman
Just know this, you will be blown away by this album.
UOFreak07

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Robert Tobin on November 15, 2010
Format: Audio CD
Everybody's hearts sank when the news broke that Aaron Gillespe was leaving the band. Most people (including me) were really worried about the state of the band whether it was the beginning of the decline for Underoath. That meant if they were to continue their high level of musicianship, they needed to get the right drummer to fill in. Daniel Davison, who was phenomenal with Norma Jean, was that one guy and has filled that missing void very well.

Underoath has a knack for one-uping themselves. I'm always stunned how they are able to do that (now) after 5 albums, but they find a way to reinvent themselves while still staying true to who they are as a band. I love how this album is harder and darker than other albums (excluding their 2 albums preceding The Changing of Times). In Division, Catch Myself Catching Myself and Illuminator are the staple Underoath energy songs you'd expect from them by now. But songs like Paper Lung and A Divine Eradication are different in contrast not only with each other but with Underoath's own style. Paper Lung is a slow building song that rides a heavy but calm bass line that ends in a blood pumping crescendo. It's quiet but very dark and heavy. On the other side, A Divine Eradication is Underoath's hardest hitting song ever with bass lines that'll vibrate a house. There's also Driftwood and Reversal which features Chirs's amazing work on keys/synths, which builds on what he was able to do on the last album. They're very digital/technical sounding with a bit of erie atmosphere.

If Lost In the Sound of Separation was Chirs Dudley's breakthrough album then Disambiguation is Spencer's, who now takes full reigns of vocals and does a phenomenal job at both screaming and singing. I'm amazed he's able to do both still and can do it without Aaron.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Austin M. Rivet on November 21, 2010
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
I'll make this first paragraph short and to the point for those who don't want to read this whole review: YOU MUST BUY THIS ALBUM! Yes it is that good.

When I found out Aaron was leaving the band, I like many others, was skeptical that Underoath could continue to produce extraordinary music. However, halfway through this album I had made up my mind - this is an amazing record!

Although this is probably their most different sounding album since Spencer joined the band it is still top notch Underoath. Spencer just keeps getting better and better and writing great music.

This album is the most hardcore yet most soft sounding Underoath record they've made. One minute Spencer is screaming his head off in a frenzied breakdown, the next he's blending his gritty yet melodic vocals into a smoothly flowing chorus. This is no doubt the most diverse Underoath record to date. Songs like In Division and My Deteriorating Incline will create an internal mosh pit within your head, while songs like Paper Lung and Illuminator will have you swaying to the rough, expertly crafted melody. The remixes at the end of the deluxe album also add another diverse touch to it as well, and I would say they are worth the extra two bucks.

"In Completion": As I said before you MUST get this album. Even with a change of lineup, and a change of pace, Disambiguation is as good as Underoath (and the hardcore genre for that matter) gets. This album will please any set of ears; from the first time Underoath listener to the seasoned "#1 Underoath fan boy".

PLEASE BUY THIS ALBUM!!! (and make it a deluxe while you're at it.)
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Erik on November 9, 2010
Format: Audio CD
Since their early days, Underoath has been constantly evolving and changing their sound. Disambiguation has proven to differ greatly from the band's more popular releases (e.g. They're Only Chasing Safety, Define the Great Line) with the departure of Aaron Gillespie's effortless clean vocals and swift, rythmic drum beats. However, Spencer has stepped up to the plate, tackling the roles of lead "lung piercing" screamer as well as the missing clean vocals in spite of negative circumstances surrounding the album's production. I was hesitant about deeper, more diaphragm centered screams that are littered through Disambiguation. But, popping out my headphones after the 11 new tracks, I found that I very much enjoy the way in which he is able to switch between clean vocals and screams without hindering the sound of the instruments, even though he comprises nearly the entire vocal track. It may not be everyone's cup of tea, persay; but Underoath deserves a fighting chance from their following. They delivered an up to par album that has a few hidden gems jampacked within. While not their best, my ears will welcome their improved sound over scores of other post hardcore bands' efforts any day
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Ben Dugan on November 9, 2010
Format: Audio CD
I'm going to keep this short.
"Disambiguation" is the best Underoath record thus far. Though it lacks any really memorable melodies, which much have gone the way of the buffalo when drummer/ singer/ founding member Aaron Gillespie left the band earlier this year, the record is the bands most consistant. The record plays much better the full way through, each song working with each other like a piece of a puzzle. It creates and sustains a mood throughout, but even better it deepens that mood, offering different shades and feels as the record progresses. Though not a concept album, "Disambiguation" certainly plays like one. It feels like one thirty two minute piece of music rather than a collection of songs.
The band is playing and writing tightier than ever before. The drumming is as crushing as ever, but a little more intricate and interesting. The guitars are thicker and heavier, but just as likely to add tension and texture as they are to add volume. The bass is funkier and more melodic than it has been on previous records, and the keyobards, when audible, add greatly to the vibe of the record. The band is firing on all cylinders.
But the biggest surprise, and a very pleasant one at that, is the vocals and lyrics of now sole vocalist Spencer Chamberlain. Whether it be because he can focus more on writing the full songs instead of parts or whatever, Chamberlain absolutley stuns on the record, sliding from his guttural howl to a surprisingly gruff yet melodic voice. Free to follow his muse solely, Chamberlain absolutley stuns on the whole record.
With a little more melody (occasionally the songs become a little same soundy, especially in the middle portion) "Disamibugation" would have been, more than likely, the record of the year.
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