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  • The Disappearance Of Garcia Lorca (1997 Film)
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The Disappearance Of Garcia Lorca (1997 Film) Soundtrack

54 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Soundtrack, November 18, 1997
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$19.69 + $3.99 shipping Only 2 left in stock. Ships from and sold by btrdev.

1. For Love Of A Poet (Overture)
2. Main Title
3. Ricardo's Theme
4. Trapped Inside My Memories
5. I Want To Feel Your Work
6. A Thunderstorm Is Brewing
7. Elegy For Jorge
8. Blood Of A Poet
9. Marie Eugenia's Theme
10. The Crumbling Sound Of Daisies
11. A Coffin Of Wheels Was His Bed
12. I Invented Some Wings For Flying
13. I Sing His Elegance
14. Five In The Shadow Of The Afternoon
15. Five By All Clocks In The Afternoon
16. Butterfly Of Your Kiss
17. Death Calling
18. Where Is My Moon? (Lorca Elegy)
19. Frederico Garcia Lorca Orchestral Suite

Product Details

  • Audio CD (November 18, 1997)
  • Original Release Date: September 12, 1997
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Soundtrack
  • Label: Intrada
  • Run Time: 114 minutes
  • ASIN: B000000O7E
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #423,085 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Elderbear VINE VOICE on May 27, 2001
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
I picked this movie up on several different excursions to the video store. Finally, I risked bringing it home, having never before heard of Federico Garcia Lorca. The opening sequence, where Garcia recites an English translation of Lorca's "Llanto por Ignacio Sanchez Mejias" over footage from the Spanish civil war, ignited something for me that the rest of the movie couldn't put to rest. Who was Lorca? What happened during the Spanish civil war? The hints dropped in the movie weren't enough. I now own the movie, books on the Spanish civil war, and Lorca's poetry, both in Spanish (which I read poorly) and English (some translations are more poetic than others, but he's providing plenty of impetus to polish my Spanish).
(Lorca was a homosexual Spanish poet & playwright, whose work is well worth reading, even in translation. Death, nature, and the indomitability of the human spirit were central themes to his lyrical, almost Zen at times, poetry. The Spanish civil war is much to complex to explain here. Orwell's "Animal Farm" gives an allegorical point of view, his "Homage to Catalonia" gives a more autobiographical perspective.)
The movie invents the story of Fernando, the child of a bourgeois Spanish businessman, who idolized Lorca as a child. In his early 30's, living with his family as expatriates in Puerto Rico, he cannot seem to bring a book he's writing about Lorca together. He sets out for Granada, his home town, to discover "The Truth" about Lorca's end.
During the movie, he discovers many "truths" about Lorca's final moments; not all of them support each other. He encounters a girl pal of his from childhood and develops that relationship. He also must deal with the harsh realities of fascism and censorship.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 24, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
A stellar performance by Andy Garcia and other American actors of Hispanic descent. The opening scene has Garcia, playing Lorca, reciting one of the Lorca's most moving poems "Death in the Afternoon" that sets the stage for the entire movie. It is an artistic film, but with drama and tension. I use it in my upper level university history course, and students, accustomed to mindless shoot-'em-ups, sit transfixed. Characters you can identify with, a history shrouded in mystery, dialog that has meaning, and scenes that capture the imagination. Film making like I thought we forgot how to make in the USA. Great stuff!
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Artbooklover on August 4, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
Strong, subtle work from a very adult, and altogether appealing Esai Morales is reason enough to see this film. He's one of the least appreciated actors in Hollywood. But the rest of the cast is impressive too: Andy Garcia as Lorca, Edward James Olmos, Miguel Ferrar, etc. etc. Stylish and elegant, poetic and evocative (the film was shot in Spain), it probably could have been better, but it was, for me, the best kind of film: One that never strays from the plausible, and one that has stayed with me, if not haunted me, since I saw it. Visceral, authentic, lovely, frightening, sad, with a tragic climax and extraordinarily true ending. Who killed Lorca? Who knows? This film helps keep him alive.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Robert Blake on April 23, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
Marcos Zurinaga's "The Disappearance Of Garcia Lorca" has style and talent, if the script were a little stronger this would surely have been an exquisite masterpiece. Still, it's always interesting, intriguing and sometimes romantic. And yes, it's entertaining. But "The Disapperance Of Garcia Lorca" is important in another area which is that it brings to the screen the mystery behind the murder of one of the best known poets. Though it doesn't come alive as it would have with a director like Oliver Stone or Michael Mann, Zurinaga captures a romantic poetic feeling here, and a dark conspiratorial one too. Andy Garcia gives a convincing performance. The film itself is elegantly mounted in the sets, cinematography and costumes. This is good filmmaking with the promise of being greater. Like "American History X," "The Disappearance Of Garcia Lorca" would have benefited from being a 3 hour movie rather than try to cover so much in only two. Especially considering it's sources being two books by Ian Gibson, "The Assassination Of Garcia Lorca" and "Federico Garcia Lorca: A Life." Still, the movie is full of great performances and style. It's important because of it's history (though the ending leaves a lot of questions of it's theory of who killed Lorca). I recommend you read the Gibson books after watching the film or before, because to an extent the film can't survive without them. Some polishes to make a longer script and this would have been great cinema. It works, but doesn't reach it's peak of greatness. The real film of the conspiracy to kill Lorca is still yet to be made. Let's hope Oliver Stone's conspiracy juices start spinning again, this film by him would surely win Best Picture. In the end, "The Disapperance Of Garcia Lorca" is worth watching. Good film.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By strega2 on September 27, 1998
Format: VHS Tape
This film tells the story of a young Spanish journalist whose family has fled the chaos of the Spanish Civil War. Having met the brilliant but subversive writer Federico Garcia Lorca (well-played by Andy Garcia) as a child, the young man returns to Spain in the 1950s to investigate Lorca's mysterious disappearance and death in the early years of the War. He meets with a wall of resistance from the Fascist authorities, who are determined to keep him from uncovering the secret. Edward James Olmos plays an enigmatic former Fascist whose offer of help may be a trap. There is a dark, brooding quality to the film, which tells Lorca's story in flashbacks, and the tension builds steadily until the startling conclusion. All the performances are convincing, and the film effectively communicates the atmosphere of underlying tension and danger of a fascist state. An entertaining thriller that keeps you on the edge of the seat. END
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