Disappearing Acts and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Disappearing Acts has been added to your Cart
Condition: :
Comment: ELIGIBLE FOR *FREE* SUPER SAVER SHIPPING. AMAZON CUSTOMER SERVICE WITH DELIVERY TRACKING. A copy that has been read, but remains in clean condition. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting. May be an ex-library copy, may have minor tears, may not contain CD, and may have wear to spine and cover--including bent pages or a bend in the book. Copy may also have a slant in spine or creases.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Disappearing Acts Mass Market Paperback – April 1, 2002


See all 28 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$7.99
$3.20 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$6.15

"Soil" by Julie Kornegay
Drawing on elements of dark comedy and modern dysfunction, Kornegay’s novel is about the gravitational pull of one man’s apocalypse and the hope that maybe he can be reeled in from the brink. See more
$7.99 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Disappearing Acts + Praisesong for the Widow
Price for both: $21.15

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

"Soil" by Julie Kornegay
Drawing on elements of dark comedy and modern dysfunction, Kornegay’s novel is about the gravitational pull of one man’s apocalypse and the hope that maybe he can be reeled in from the brink. See more

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Signet (April 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451205634
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451205636
  • Product Dimensions: 4.5 x 1.3 x 6.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (136 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #515,585 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This is a story of love between Zora, an independent, aspiring singer, and Franklin, a sometimes-employed carpenter. Life has been unkind to these star-crossed lovers, but they're both survivors. "Despite an abundance of flash and energy, this book lacks the depth and breadth to which McMillan aspires," commented PW .
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

By the author of Mama (LJ 1/15/87), this second novel is a boy-meets-girl story from the black perspective. Franklin is an on-again, off-again construction worker trying to get his life on a firmer foundation. Zora is a music teacher and would-be singer. They meet and start a relationship that initially seems ideal. Soon, however, problems emerge. Franklin's ego has never recovered from his destructive mother's abuse, and the repeated blows the oppressive white society dishes out make him increasingly depressed and hostile. The relationship begins to fall apart. Zora and Franklin have to grow a long way alone before they can come back together. This easy-to-enjoy novel will certainly touch readers who identify with the situation. It's a pity that McMillan's lively narrative is marred by occasional woodenness and that she has a penchant for stating what should be inferred by the reader. Movie rights have been sold, so this could be a biggie.
- Janet Boyarin Blundell, Brookdale Community Coll., Lincroft, N.Y.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

If you only pick one of her books to read, pick this one!
Hempist
As I've said in another review, if you've only seen the movie, do yourself a favor and read the book.
Gayle Jackson Sloan
This book is also a very real depiction of real relationships.
DeeD

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By M. J Pronio on May 16, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is my second review of this novel... the first review I wrote got lost in cyber-space. That in itself should say alot about this book because I really wouldn't take the time to write another review unless the book 'deserved' it. And this one does.
This book was so 'real' that I never felt as though I was picking up a book to read it... I felt as though I was living it.
Terry McMillan has such an extraordinary talent for making characters come alive.... she is truly gifted.
This story is about Zora, a twentysomething, college-educated woman who has chosen bad men all along the way (been there, done that). She is trying to figure out why she's chosen these guys and is determined not to repeat these mistakes. She is also a talented singer who is determined to 'make it'.
Franklin is a father of two ... separated from his wife and is living in a rooming home just trying to get his 'constitution' together. While he works out, does his woodworking, and struggles to keep a job and pay his child support, he is doing pretty well. He is smart, charming, talented, big and sexy.
Zora and Franklin meet at the apartment she has just rented in Brooklyn, NY. He is the laborer working on her floors. At first their meeting is simple, but as the two continue to get to know each other, an intense and close relationship develops.
They fall in love.... and with that comes the story. So real, so happy, so heart wrenching.
Franklin is a man who you will love and hate at the same time. He has a huge heart but is burdened by his inability to achieve what he is capable of. He is constantly reminded of 'the white man's power' and is wounded by his own Mother's lack of love. This combination is a major negative force for him.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By "akwasijulius" on February 12, 2001
Format: Paperback
A lot has been said on Disappearing acts, so I'm going to keep mine short and simple. Well this was the first black frictional book I read some years ago. The most interesting thing is that I have re-read it twice since, and every time I have to recommend a book for one of my friends, this is among one of the first books I would recommend (that is if they haven't already read it). This is a fictional story based on the relationship between a boy and a girl. Franklin is a blue-collar worker with a truck full of excess baggage from his previous marriage, and in his own words says he is taking a vacation from all of 'em. Zora is a collage-educated music teacher who is also trying to make a fresh start after a string of bad choices. Well, they meet up and all their resolutions do a "Disappearing act". They go through the roller-coaster ride of boy meet girl, and sometimes it even goes to the extreme, but Terry does not mince with her words. In fact that is what I like about McMillan's writings, she tells it as it is in any given situation. So if you are looking for a good book to read that would keep you up and take you through the motions, then this boy meets girl with a difference is definitely the one for you.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Lorraine Ginelle Stephens on September 6, 2002
Format: Hardcover
The first time I read the book I loved it, I couldn't put it down, I wanted them to make a movie, I, well, I was 14. The second time around at age 19 I wasn't so impressed. Reading it a second time, with a mature mind let me see things I missed the first time. Was it me or did anybody notice Franklin did all of the following things...
-Raped Zora
-Hit Zora
-Cheated on Zora
-Abandoned Zora and the baby
-Destroyed Zora's house
-Verbally abused her by calling her fat
-Lied to her about his divorce/children/lack of college degree
Yet still in the end they ended up together and we are supposed to call this a love story. Puh-lease! This is more like a tragedy.
Terry McMillan is a wonderful writer, yet still this book is sad and lacking. It's sad because she glorified the Tragedy of so many African American women. Franklin was a poor example of an African American man, Zora...she's just weak. She got pregnant out of wedlock 4 times. It needs repeating, 4 times. If Zora was a real life person my friends and I would have some 3 and 4 letter words to describe her. I'll just call her loose. If it wasn't for the plot I'd love this book because it's so realistic and Terry's Dialogue has always seemed like the voices of people I know. However, as a strong Black woman I can't support such a weak individual as Zora, had it been me I would've never let Franklin back into my life or my bed. This is a twisted story.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By An aspiring novelist (sugabunz@yahoo.com) on October 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
Okay,so I read the book. It was the bomb for it being my first black novel but when I went back and read bits and pieces of it again, I realized how weak Franklin actually made Zora. Our girl went downhill in relation to her common senses and uphill in relation to her weakness. So what if the brotha was fine! He was broke, barely educated, and plain old disrespectful: everything Zora was not. When are we ladies(of all nationalities) going to learn to listen to God and see past that playaz charm? But even with soft-hard, love-hate characters, the girl(Terry) can put that pen to the paper and make you feel what they would feel if they were real and THAT is what makes a good writer. At any rate, I still enjoyed seeing real life on paper. I would love to further discuss this and other books via e-mail at sugabunz@yahoo.com.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Terry McMillan fell in love with books as a teenager while working at the local library. She studied journalism at UC Berkeley and screenwriting at Columbia before making her fiction debut with Mama, which one both the Doubleday New Voices in Fiction Award and the American Book Award. She lives in Northern California.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Disappearing Acts
This item: Disappearing Acts
Price: $7.99
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com