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Discipline


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Audio CD, November 22, 2004
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"King Crimson is, as always, more a way of doing things. When there is nothing to be done, nothing is done: Crimson disappears. When there is music to be played, Crimson reappears. If all of life were this simple". Robert Fripp

King Crimson was conceived in November 1968 and born on January 13th 1969 in the Fulham Palace Cafe, London (Fripp/Ian McDonald/Greg Lake/Michael ... Read more in Amazon's King Crimson Store

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Discipline + Three of a Perfect Pair + Larks' Tongues in Aspic, 40th Anniversary Edition
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (November 22, 2004)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Discipline Us
  • ASIN: B00064WSNW
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (182 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,372 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Elephant Talk
2. Frame By Frame
3. Matte Kudesai
4. Indiscipline
5. Thela Hun Gingeet
6. Sheltering Sky
7. Discipline
8. Matte Kudesai (Alternateive Version)

Editorial Reviews

With this 1981 LP, King Crimson became one of the few bands to release a classic in three different decades. This was their highest-charting LP (#45) in 11 years, and that Fripp/Belew guitar interplay still dazzles; includes a bonus alternate version of Matte Kudesai !

Customer Reviews

It is like listening to the album all over again.
herb
Levin's bassmanship and his work on the stick make for some impressive backdrops that balance greatly with Belew's and Fripp's interweaving guitar lines.
Ilker Yucel
This is easily one of the band's very best albums.
Alan Caylow

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

104 of 109 people found the following review helpful By Michael Stack VINE VOICE on November 4, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Several years after the band broke up, Robert Fripp resurrected King Crimson, but in a way no one would have expected. Returning was drummer Bill Bruford, and joining was bassist/stickist/backing vocalist Tony Levin and one of the few who could stand next to Robert Fripp holding his chosen instrument and not look inept, guitarist/vocalist Adrian Belew. Originally a band called Discipline, Fripp realized this was King Crimson and renamed the band. Wrapped in a red sleeve with a Celtic knot on the cover, this album is in many ways as the cover implies-- intertwining and interlocking-- Fripp and Belew's guitars play complex lines that live with each other and don't stand without each other, supported by Levin's thunderous bass and melody vs. countermelody playing on the stick. Below all of this, Bruford is easily holding it all together. The album is one of the true greats of its era, and is certainly among the best Crimson has ever recorded.

From the opener, "Elephant Talk", you know you're in for something different-- Levin's melody/countermelody intro overlayed with two intertwined guitars, elephant squeals on guitar, a half-spoken vocal, and two bizarre guitar solos. Five minutes later, you're overwhelmed, what's amazing is that its got a groove, its a great rhythm, its just plain amazing.

The rest of the album pretty much follows suit in terms of being brilliant to the point of overwhelming while the environment and the mood changes-- interlocking guitars rule several of the songs (the breathtaking "Frame By Frame", with impassioned vocals and some of the fastest guitar licks you'll ever hear, the frantic "Thela Hun Ginjeet", and the title track-- an instrumental where you can really hear Fripp and Belew get into a groove).
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81 of 89 people found the following review helpful By Chris Matthews on October 30, 2002
Format: Audio CD
Back in my punk rock days we used to go around bashing all the prog rock dinosaur bands. It was 1980 and I was still into Bowie 'cause he was a freak, so I went out and bought the new 'Scary Monsters' record.
As I listened to that album, I immediately wanted to know who in the hell the WILD guitar playing was by. It obviously wasn't Mick Ronson. Earl Slick? No. Carlos Alomar? Nope. I turned the album over: Robert Fripp......huh? Never heard of him.
He must be new. The guy obviously had a LOT of musical training, but here he was doing these strange licks all over the record that managed to be beautiful & frightening at the same time...and MY GOD he was fast! The licks on Because You're Young outblazed the (then) new Eddie Van Halen & this guy WAS PICKING, not 'tapping'! I was astounded. I had to know where this superguitarist came from.
Fortunately, at the time I was also into the Talking Heads & Zappa, so I was following the career of another new avant-garde guitar player named Adrian Belew. In an interview he mentioned that he had joined the newly "reformed" King Crimson. I had heard of them, but wrote them off as old prog rock bastards like ELP & Yes with their 100 year long flights of boredom. However, Adrian mentioned that his fellow guitarist was Robert Fripp.
CooL! That was the dude I'd been looking for! This was going to be a hellacious band.
I had no idea at the time how right I was, and how utterly ignorant of the Crimson version of prog rock I had been.
Quick trip to the record store: Hey! New King Crimson album!
Called Discipline. Yep, Fripp & Belew are on here. I GOTTA have this album! Hmmm...bass player is Tony Levin. I've heard of him. Oh yeah, he's on that new guy's album I just bought...Peter Gabriel. And Bruford.
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53 of 57 people found the following review helpful By Alan Caylow on April 1, 2006
Format: Audio CD
After the release of 1974's "Red," King Crimson guitarist/leader Robert Fripp declared to the press, "King Crimson is over. Forever and ever." But seven years later, Fripp changed his mind and resurrected the band. Hooking up again with Crimson drummer Bill Bruford, and with new recruits Adrian Belew on guitar and vocals and bassist Tony Levin, King Crimson came roaring back to life with 1981's "Discipline." But this was certainly not the same Crimson of yor. You still had Fripp and Bruford from the classic Crimson line-up, but with the addition of Belew's soaring voice & frenetic guitar, Levin's ominous basslines, and a more streamlined approach to the music---including some more melodic elements than usual from Crimson---the band's sound was practically re-written from scratch with "Discipline." And some fans didn't like it, dismissing this version of King Crimson as "The Adrian Belew Band." But, for the more open-minded Crimheads, "Discipline" was exciting and fresh, a glorious new direction for this classic prog-rock band. And I agree. Even with more melodies, the band are still very much in a prog mode on this album. They didn't go pop. It's just *different* prog music than what they did before. From the great, interlocking grooves & sonics of "Elephant Talk," to the wistful beauty of "Matte Kudasai," to the frantic musical AND lyrical attack of "Thela Hun Ginjeet," to the hypnotic sounds of the instrumental "The Sheltering Sky," this album is simply amazing, the musical chemistry between Fripp, Bruford, Belew and Levin outstanding. With "Discipline," King Crimson opened the second chapter of their impressive musical career with a daring, challenging, powerful work. This is easily one of the band's very best albums.
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