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Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis Hardcover – December 1, 2010


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Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis + Discourse Features of New Testament Greek: A Coursebook on the Information Structure of New Testament Greek + Basics of Verbal Aspect in Biblical Greek
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Hendrickson Publishers, Inc.; Bilingual edition (December 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1598565834
  • ISBN-13: 978-1598565836
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #592,904 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Steven E. Runge is the General Editor of the Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament. He has a Master of Theological Studies degree in Biblical Languages from Trinity Western Seminary in Langley, B.C., Canada; a BA in Speech Communication from Western Washington University; and a Doctor of Literature degree in Biblical Languages from the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa. He has served as an adjunct faculty member at Northwest Baptist Theological College, Trinity Western University, and Associated Canadian Theological Schools (ACTS) while completing his education.

More About the Author

Steven E. Runge (DLitt) serves as Scholar-in-Residence for Logos Bible Software, and as a Research Associate for the Department of Ancient Studies, University of Stellenbosch.

GREEK DISCOURSE SUITE
Runge is the General Editor of the Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament (LDGNT), an electronic Greek text that annotates all occurrences of the devices described in the Discourse Grammar. The grammar enables readers to understand the exegetical role the devices play within the discourse. The LDGNT saves time and frustration by providing an expert analysis; interact with it just like you would any other specialized commentary. An English version of the same data is included with the LDGNT bundle. Together these resources function as an integrated suite of exegetical materials, making doctoral-level research accessible to specialist and non-specialist alike.

For more information about the LDGNT suite, see www.logos.com/ldgnt.

DISCOURSE COMMENTARY
The concepts described above are applied using non-technical language in the High Definition Commentary series.The Philippians volume will be released in 2010, Romans and one other volume are forthcoming in 2011. See http://www.logos.com/products/search?q=runge

HEBREW BIBLE
There is a companion suite of materials being developed for the Hebrew Bible. More information may be found at http://www.logos.com/ldhot

BLOG POSTS AND ARTICLES
For conference papers and related blog posts, see www.ntdiscourse.org.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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Yes, it is a lot of work reading but it is very much worth it.
Nick Bartol
Some theory is quite involved, and you cannot just read through and memorize things as if you were learning traditional grammar.
Eeli Kaikkonen
This is gold for evaluating discourse and provides insight when tracing the argument of the author.
RShannon

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 13, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Steven Runge's 2010 "Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament" is an essential resource for any NT Greek student, which is why so many sold at the 2010 Evangelical Theological Society. His book is written simply enough that a relatively new student to Greek can understand it, but it includes a unified conception of NT Greek that answers many questions that have been debated in the field for years (for instance, his treatment of some of Stanley Porter's ideas improve upon previous understandings of the role of verbal aspect). Runge fills in the gaps of understanding NT Greek by helping the reader to see how grammar extends beyond the level of sentence syntax to the level of paragraphs and beyond. In case after case, he simply explains what many Greek scholars could previously arrive at only through unexamined intuition, because he teaches the reader to see the deliberate methods the NT uses to highlight and structure elements of the text. He uses many scriptural examples to explain everything from the difference of the basic conjunctions to the use of adverbial participles to relegate actions to a supporting role. Everyone intuitively knows that language goes beyond dictionary-definitions of words (semantics), Runge will take you to beyond mere semantics a new level of understanding NT Greek.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By R. W. Brannan on December 5, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Anyone who has taken first-year Greek knows that KAI means "and" (well, except where it might mean "also") and that DE means "but" (well, except for where it really means "and" or perhaps "now"). At least that's what you're told. In truth, however, each of these conjunctions have a single overriding function that doesn't correlate neatly with a single English word.

Runge teaches you the function of these words, not a simple and wholly inadequate gloss. And that's just conjunctions. Runge's Discourse Grammar will shift your brain, and help you to think beyond the word level to better understand the information structure of the text you're reading.

The chapter on conjunctions alone is worth the price of the book. Learning about "meta-comments" and "point-counterpoint sets", not to mention great material on how participles work, is bonus and well worth it. Highly recommended.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Phillip Marshall on December 3, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I've been using Runge's book (the electronic version on Logos) with my master's level Greek students who are doing readings in Acts at Houston Baptist University. It is a welcome addition to the Greek language resources that we use, and I'm so glad to see that it is finally being printed for those who do not have Logos software. Runge makes the benefits of linguistics / discourse analysis accessible, and I for one will make this required reading for all my Greek students who progress beyond first-year grammar. DGGNT is *first rate*--thanks so much, Steve!

Dr. Phillip Marshall
Houston Baptist University
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Nick Bartol on May 31, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
With a ThM (Master of Theology) from Dallas Theological Seminary, one would think that I would have been taught all the major approaches to Bible interpretation. My professors tried hard! But new stuff has come along.

Linguists have developed an interpretive process known as Discourse Analysis. This approach covers a lot of textual features not well addressed by traditional interpretation. Take the "redundant quotative frame" (you know, those silly "He answered and said" couplets). Why the repetition? "He answered" would have served the point. No, it is redundant for a reason! The author is showing by the "unnecessary" repettion that what follows is a change in direction or an unusually important point. We might underline the text or put it all in capitals.

Runge introduces one to tens of features like this. He does it in a clear and compelling way. You will never read your NT or OT the same again! Some of the features require the original languages and some are quite clear even in a literal English translation.

I cannot too highly recommend this book. Yes, it is a lot of work reading but it is very much worth it. I suggest studying it in half hour chunks to avoid burnout. One really cannot absorb much more than this anyways.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Eeli Kaikkonen on May 11, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It really seems that discourse studies are the future of the Biblical language studies. Runge has opened my eyes, first in his web pages, and now in this book. I am beginning to understand the difference between knowing about the language and understanding it. There is some crucial help for understanding e.g. conjunctions, participles and word order.

Seeing how conjunctions work was immediately helpful in a Bible study group for tracing the argument of Paul. It is wonderful to be enlightened after thinking so long that these small words are just some stuffing or belong to "style" if they cannot be translated directly.

Another great thing this book has done to me is freeing to think about Greek in terms of Greek, not English (or Finnish, my native language). It is so easy to fall into trap of instantly translating without actually thinking in Greek. Runge points out how trying to find glosses or target language structures distracts us from the real semantics and pragmatics of Greek.

I have heard there is some bad blood between traditional grammarians and linguists. I have seen D. Wallace's Grammar being described as the most overrated grammar in the world. Runge is different. He is humble enough to learn from others and several times says how grammarians have actually understood a phenomenon intuitively but lacked a theoretical framework to talk about it clearly. Linguistics can offer that framework, and I am assured that we need more scholars who know both the language and linguistics. If this world were perfect, all Greek teachers would from now on learn discourse grammar and linguistics before teaching others.

This book is not as easy to comprehend as some reviews let us understand.
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