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Disneynature: African Cats (Two-Disc Blu-ray/DVD Combo in Blu-ray Packaging)

4.5 out of 5 stars 257 customer reviews

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$15.71 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 14 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

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Editorial Reviews

From Disneynature, the studio that brought you Earth and Oceans, comes the epic journey African Cats. Set against one of the wildest places on Earth, you'll experience the extraordinary adventure of two families as they strive to make a home in an untamed land. Stunning high-definition images take your breath away as you come face-to-face with these majestic kings of the savanna and their true-life love, humor, and determination. Blending family bonds with the power and majesty of the wild, it's an exciting, awe-inspiring experience that will touch your heart.

Special Features

Filmmaker Annotations - Interactive Experience Takes You Behind The Scenes With The Filmmakers And Conservationists
• "The World I Knew" by Jordin Sparks Music Video
• Plus All DVD bonus features

Product Details

  • Actors: Samuel L. Jackson
  • Directors: Keith Scholey, Alastair Fothergill
  • Format: AC-3, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, DTS Surround Sound, Dubbed, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen, Multiple Formats
  • Language: English (DTS-HD High Res Audio), French (Dolby Digital 5.1), Spanish (Dolby Digital 5.1)
  • Subtitles: French, Spanish, English
  • Dubbed: French, Spanish
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: G (General Audience)
  • Studio: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: October 4, 2011
  • Run Time: 89 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (257 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00559SGCU
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #42,561 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Disneynature: African Cats (Two-Disc Blu-ray/DVD Combo in Blu-ray Packaging)" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
I was ready to jump out of my seat with joy when i saw the previews for this. The movie more than lived up to my expectations.
I've been a huge admirer of wild cats ever since i saw Born Free as a little girl. Lions, cheetahs, tigers, servals you name it. I've watched many video's and t.v. specials on them over the years but few compare to DisneyNature African cats.
Showing both good times and bad this is an acurate depiction of these cats lives. Disney did an admirable job of making it as family friendly as possible. Yes, some scenes may upset very young viewers. If you're worried about a 'Bambi' moment you may want to preview it first.
However i strongly recommend you get this film and save it for when they are ready.
It's a beautiful, honest movie about some of this world's most majestic and inspiring beings. African Cats and other DisneyNature films are 'living' memories of our world. A world in which sadly lions and cheetahs may soon be a thing of our past.
I eagerly look forward to getting the dvd of this. It's only available in a dvd/blue ray combo but as long as there's a disc i can use with my dvd player, ok.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
I saw this movie at the theater and LOVED IT. I particularly loved the way they portrayed lions. Too often are lions portrayed as the bad guys who are just out to kill the sweet little zebras and antelope. This film actually makes you understand that just because lions kill for food doesn't mean they're bad--they have a family to feed. At some parts, I was actually cheering for the lions to get food, because if they didn't, the cubs wouldn't survive. This film also shows the affectionate and playful side to lions, while still showing their aggressive and predatory side. I really wasn't expecting lions to be so family-oriented and sweet to each other. Then again, I guess that's how the pride becomes strong.

I also like how it shows that big cats have their own problems too and that they aren't trouble-free bullies, like so many other animal programs make them out to be. Of course, this movie has animal death, but then again, what do you expect? It's a movie about LIONS and CHEETAHS--of course they are going to show how they get food! I have read too many reviews on other sites from people complaining about Disney showing how lions and cheetahs kill for food, and claiming that they ran out of the theater CRYING with their kids in tow. Okay, idiots, if you want to see a movie about the lives of LIONS AND CHEETAHS, common sense tells you that you will see some blood. If your common sense does not tell you that, then that's your own fault for being ignorant. I mean seriously. There was even death and violence in "March of the Penguins"! Even so, the killings in "African Cats" are not very graphic. Really, you just see a hunt, a strike, and maybe some blood on the cats' faces after they've eaten, but it's nowhere near as graphic as some drama queens make it out to be.
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Disneynature has carved a niche for itself in theatrical releases of nature films with varying success. Earth and Oceans were moderately profitable, though they suffered from an episodic structure that did not hold an audience's attention, and terrible narration that distracted pointlessly. The strongest release yet is African Cats, co-directed by one of the architects of Planet Earth, Alastair Fothergill. Following a pride of lions and a mother cheetah, African Cats considers apex predators and their interplay on the productive Mara veldt. The camerawork captures the vastness of the Masai Mara plains while not losing sight of the intimate details essential to understanding the bonds between mother and cub. It lacks the violence of The Last Lions, but none of its storytelling verve, and brings some needed energy to a fairly barren week for film.

African Cats follows events in the lives of Mara, a lion cub who is under the tutelage of her mother, Layla; Sita, a cheetah who is raising five hungry newborns; and Fang, a male lion who attempts to protect his family and territory from a rival lion. Survival on the bitter savanna is a perpetual struggle. Mara is only six months old, and as a lion cub has a 1 in 5 chance of surviving to adulthood. Life seems simple for a cub, awaiting kills and playing with siblings while learning gradually how to fend for themselves; Mara's days are numbered, however, as the mother is nursing an injury that is slowing her down. Sita must regularly leave her cubs to hunt for food, leaving them vulnerable to attack. Even if she makes a kill, cheetahs are regularly chased from it by hyenas or lions. Cheetahs are built for grace and speed, not for standing fights.
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Comment 32 of 37 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Blu-ray
This has some of the most beautiful shots I ever witnessed in a documentary. Migrating antelope, breathtaking landscapes, priceless cat behavior - in retrospect, this movie would be far better if without the narration. Instead I was force-fed an uber-anthropomorphic plot that was unforgivably dumbed down. Examples include stating that a baby cub "thinks her dad is the best in the world" and calling crocodiles "dragons." I'm constantly reminded how much the mothers sacrifice, how much they love each other and so forth. Love and sacrifice are by no means exclusive to humans, but throughout the movie I get the feeling that Disney is trying so hard to show me how similar lions and cheetahs are to us by assuming an omniscient role with respect to their thoughts. It would be far more powerful to just narrate their actions - only touching on thoughts or emotions when its most obvious. For instance, if cub that is playing with its mother, it might not actually be thinking "I love you so much" perhaps she is simply thinking "this is fun!" As far as the extent of anthropomorphism, it felt just a hair shy of "Homeward Bound," which makes it one of the weakest documentaries I can remember. I realize this style is intended for children, however, March of the Penguins - a great movie for kids, does a far superior job in this respect. Instead of taking on the impossible by attempting to tell me what the penguins are "thinking," it focuses on their actions, allowing me the freedom to project. Children have an innate ability to learn. Dumbing things down to the point of calling crocodiles "dragons" is a disservice to that, as well as to how interesting and beautiful the natural world is without the need for the supernatural or anthropomorphism. If you want to see it for the beautiful filming, then make sure you have your iPod charged and ready. Sorry Sam Jackson, it's not your fault.
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Disneynature: African Cats (Two-Disc Blu-ray/DVD Combo in Blu-ray Packaging)
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