Buy Used
$4.34
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is in used condition. Your satisfaction is guaranteed!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Divided Jerusalem: The Struggle for the Holy City Hardcover – September 1, 2001


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$4.00 $0.01

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Intractable conflicts concerning religion and national sovereignty have always intertwined around Jerusalem. Focusing on diplomacy from antiquity to the present, Wasserstein (Vanishing Diaspora), a professor of history at Glasgow University and president of the Jewish Historical Society of England, traces the city's constant transformations in size, infrastructure and political rule. At various times, Egyptians, Turks, French, British, Israelis and Jordanians have controlled parts of Jerusalem. Moreover, while it has always been considered a "holy city," its holiness "is neither a constant nor an absolute" but rather a human construct that has "waxed and waned" over the centuries for Muslims, Jews and Christians alike. Wasserstein also follows intriguing, less-traveled lines of investigation, such as the diminishing Christian presence during the 20th century. Even as the violence in Jerusalem continues, the historical perspective offered in these pages provides hope for a way out. The author locates the Camp David negotiations, for instance, in a broad historical context: the Israeli-American proposal "for allowing Jews to pray on the Mount and the possible designation of a special section for that purpose... marked... a radical departure from both Muslim and Jewish tradition as well as from the policy of every Israeli government since 1967." In Wasserstein's view, a power-sharing solution is possible only if religious and national interests are separated. Though he doesn't offer a specific solution, his sympathies seem to lie with aspects of the now-moribund Oslo peace accord. This astute, incisive treatment of an age-old struggle erupting in a present-day crisis adds a calm, thoughtful voice to the debates. Maps. (Sept.)Forecast: Wasserstein's glowing reputation and his planned lectures in Boston, New York and Washington will win this book a lot of attention.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

Review

"A book which deserves praise for its meticulous scholarship, cool judgment, and even-handed, non-partisan consideration of an impossible problem." -- Frank McLynn, The Glasgow Herald

"A valuable and lucid analysis of just how divided Jerusalem is." -- Hyam Maccoby, Evening Standard

"Astute, incisive treatment of an age-old struggle erupting in a present-day crisis…a calm, thoughtful voice to the debates." -- Publishers Weekly

"Interesting and articulate . . . traces the struggles of a plethora of religious and national groups to control Jerusalem over two millennia." -- Colin Shindler, Jerusalem Post

"Interesting and articulate…traces the struggles of a plethora of religious and national groups to control Jerusalem over two millennia." -- Colin Shindler, Jerusalem Post

"One of our most distinguished writers on Jewish history . . . [provides] a well informed and penetrating exploration of 'the Jerusalem question.'" -- Geoffrey Wheatcroft, Sunday Times (London)

"Scrupulously unbiased." -- Harvey Morris, Financial Times

"Wasserstein . . . writes clearly and dispassionately on a theme that has been more cliché-ridden than most." -- Amos Elon, The New York Review
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press; First Edition edition (September 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300091648
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300091649
  • Product Dimensions: 9.8 x 6.2 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,152,641 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 18 people found the following review helpful By William Podmore on June 25, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book is a study of the `question of Jerusalem' in international diplomacy, a matter that is bound up with the question of Israel-Palestine relations. It presents a very detailed history of the city's troubled past and present.
Unhappy Palestine, so near to Europe, so dear to God! For millennia, three intolerant monotheisms have fought over the Holy Land, and the more religion has flourished, the less the chance of resolution. More recently, outside colonial forces, the Vatican particularly, have fomented trouble. As Lord Palmerston warned, "Religious protections pave the way for political dismemberments." Nowadays, religious fanatics are a large part of the problem, whether ultra-Orthodox New York Jews creating illegal settlements in the West Bank and Gaza, or Hamas leaders promoting terror tactics against Israeli workers.
In June 1967, Israel seized and annexed east Jerusalem. In July, the UN General Assembly resolved that the Israeli government's measures there were invalid and called on it to rescind them. In May 1968 the Security Council made a similar Resolution; the US government abstained both times. The USA has consistently used its veto to support the Israeli government's building of illegal settlements.
On 31 October 1995, an agreement was reached between Israel's Deputy Foreign Minister, Yossi Beilin, and a close colleague of Chairman Arafat, Abu Mazen. They agreed that there should be a Palestinian state within agreed boundaries, in which Israeli settlements would be dismantled, and to which Palestinian refugees would be allowed to return. Israel would recognise eastern Jerusalem as the capital of Palestine, and Palestine would recognise western Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Jill Malter on March 11, 2005
Format: Hardcover
There is some history of Jerusalem here. But it isn't all that good. And the author's conclusions are dubious at best.

Suppose we were to see a history of Vilnius. We'd discover that the capital of Lithuania could be claimed by Russia, Belorus, or even Poland. Of course, these places have their own capitals. But why not steal someone else's? We could make up a story that some Russian Czar once dreamed of Vilnius. That ought to give folks a right to swipe it!

And there is a demographic argument! Lithuania doesn't have as many people as Russia. Surely, we ought to bow to reality and let Russia have it. Or at least internationalize it!

The problem with the demographic argument is that the Russians have a huge land while the Lithuanians have a small one. Unless Vilnius is stolen from the Lithuanians by force, the Lithuanians are very likely to keep it.

Now, let's see if we can do a little better than Wasserstein, and apply this reasoning to Jerusalem.

The author admits that in 1910, there were about 45,000 Jews in Jerusalem as opposed to 12,000 Muslims and 12,900 Christians. Jerusalem had been the capital of the Jews for millenia, since the time of King David. And even in the mid-1870s, before Modern Zionism began, Jerualem's Jews were a majority of the population.

In 1910, we see that Jews were well over 60% of the population. They still are. Unless violence is used to get rid of them, the Jews will keep Jerusalem.

Now, it is true that we could make up a story about Mohammed dreaming about Jerusalem. Hey, we could make up a story about Mohammed's horse being born in the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem, exactly 600 years to the day after the birth of Jesus.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 39 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 22, 2001
Format: Hardcover
A misleading book in which under the thin gloss of scholarly objectivity, the very survival of Jerusalem is exposed to adversity.
Though smoothly technically proficient, the selection of "evidence" is highly militant: it advocates the end of Jerusalem as a Jewish capital and makes enormous efforts to hide the age-old connection of the Jewish people to Jerusalem. It balances it symmetrically with connectedness to Jerusalem by others. It plays up everything it can get a hold of to prove that Jerusalem is not central and inalianbly a part of the Jewish predicament. It uses non-evidence very cleverly. (i.e. plays up things not said and mention not made [but possilby taken for granted] by the founders of Zionism and the Jewish State.)
Jerusalem will be the capital of Jewish Israel for centuries to come by which time this book will be long (and rightly) forgotten.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?