Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Divided Labours: An Evolutionary View of Women at Work (Darwinism Today series) 1st Edition

3.8 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0300080261
ISBN-10: 0300080263
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used
$5.45
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Only one drawing line in text. Others are no different from a new one.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
24 Used from $0.48
More Buying Choices
16 New from $1.99 24 Used from $0.48
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Save Up to 90% on Textbooks Textbooks

Editorial Reviews

Review

Kingsley Browne . . . gives us a biological argument against gender-discrimination suits and affirmative-action legislation. . . . People interested in issues of gender inequality really should be aware of this position. Divided Labors represents a new, sexual Social Darwinism. -- R. Brian Ferguson, Natural History
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE



Product Details

  • Series: Darwinism Today series
  • Hardcover: 80 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press; 1st edition (October 11, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300080263
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300080261
  • Product Dimensions: 7.3 x 4.9 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.9 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,422,595 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on July 12, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Many social scientists now admit that 20th century emphasis on nurture to the exclusion of nature was overdrawn. With the success in the mapping of the Human Genome and the emergence of evolutionary biology from the shadow of the so-called hard sciences the pendulum now seems to be moving back. How do we keep our balance on these shifting and ideologically charged sands?
Peter Singer in A Darwinian Left: Politics, Evolution and Cooperation (also reviewed by me) suggests some principles that a new Darwinian Left adopt. One is not to deny the existence of a human nature nor assume that it is "infinitely malleable". Another is not to assume "that all inequalities are due to discrimination, prejudice, oppression or social conditioning". It is in the spirit of attempting to apply these principles that I believe Divided Labours should be read.
The author is a law professor and his book reads like a legal brief. That said the writing is very clear and seemingly fair as far as it goes. He is particularly careful in specifying the limitations of what can be inferred from some of his evolutionary facts. He also provides some good examples of the kind of population thinking necessary for understanding many of these kinds of issues. He mentions that at the height of five-feet-ten the ratio of males to females is 30:1. A six-foot, only two inches taller, it is 2000:1. Understanding the implications of these kinds of facts is crucial and I wish he had included a chapter emphasizing the importance and differences of population thinking versus concentrating on the individual.
So what is the books brief?
Read more ›
Comment 7 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I enjoyed this original and highly readable work enormously. Through its reliance on facts and logic, it makes a compelling case against the victim mentality of radical feminism. The author shows females to be as capable as males of making the choices most consistent with their interests and values--and that these often (though not always) differ between the sexes for reasons best explained by the science of evolutionary psychology.
I share the concern echoed by other reviewers regarding the bizarre comment submitted by a "reader from Northeast USA." Any reasonable person who has read one of Kingsley Browne's many papers or heard him speak at conferences on evolutionary law will realize that his only agenda is to call the facts and their policy implications as he sees them. This is a scholarly agenda--unlike anonymous ad hominem attacks, a classic tactic of those whose agenda is truly political in nature.
Comment 8 of 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Over the past three decades, western societies have been spectacularly successful in eliminating many forms of discrimination against women. In some important areas of the workplace, however, women as a group have not enjoyed a high level of success. For example, there are relatively few female firefighters, female fighter jet pilots, and, more importantly, relatively few female top executives. In Divided Labours, Kingsley Browne suggests that the under-representation of women in certain risky professions is consistent with evolutionary theory and should not be assumed without serious proof to be the result of social or individual discrimination. Professor Browne is an excellent writer and provocative thinker. Over the past decade, he has written extensively on law and biology issues and has presented his research at many academic conferences in the United States and abroad. This book presents that research in understandable terms to a larger audience.
I note with some astonishment that an anonymous reviewer on this website has characterized Professor Browne as a marginal academic who has written little and who does not separate his science from his politics. These claims are worse then nonsense - they constitute libel, pure and simple. The topic on which Browne writes is a sensitive one. Some people seem to believe, falsely in my opinion, that an evolutionary explanation of temperamental differences between men and women will lead to a letdown in the political drive to eliminate discrimination against women in the workplace. The anonymous reviewer may be libeling Browne in the hope of discrediting the scientific theories presented in Browne's book. This individual is spitting into the wind.
Comment 9 of 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on June 18, 2000
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you're interested in a different point of view on this subject, this books offers much to think about. Today, it's very difficult to find readily available information on this subject that is not politically correct. So, if you'd like to see what might be on the other side of the "Glass Ceiling," I'd read this very short book. The best argument I can make for reading this book is to read the ad hominem arguments made by the other reviewers; that's what made me buy it and I'm glad I did. Don't you just hate being told NOT to read something?
Comment 5 of 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on May 30, 2000
Format: Hardcover
The Darwinism Today series, put together by Helena Cronin and Oliver Curry, is a collection of very short books on evolutionary psychology. The series advertisements promise books by "leading figures" presenting "the latest Darwinian thinking." That's a somewhat misleading description of the series in general, but with regard to Divided Labours it's plainly deceptive. There is nothing leading about Kingsley Browne or late about his transparently political "thinking."
Browne is at best a marginal figure, certainly among evolutionary psychologists (most of whom I'm sure have never heard of him) but even among evolutionary legal scholars. As far as I know, he has written all of 2 law review articles in the past 2 decades, neither of which has attracted much attention (properly -- they're both so long and desperately political that they fall flat). The editors of Darwinism Today must have really owed Browne some kind of life debt to have allowed Browne to be included in a series with the likes of Daly and Wilson.
So, nothing leading about Browne. Also, nothing late about this work -- not to mention, very little that is right or interesting. Browne wants badly to argue that evolutionary research shows that efforts to increase sex equity in the workplace are doomed to failure. He first made this argument in print in the early 1980s, when sociobiology had such a narrow, static view of sex differences that it might have seemed plausible.
The problem for Browne is that evolutionary psychology has matured in the time since and can no longer support such simple-minded conclusions. So Browne has to resort to misrepresentation to make his political argument.
Read more ›
Comment 7 of 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: gender studies