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The Dixiecrat Revolt and the End of the Solid South, 1932-1968 1st Edition

3 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0807825945
ISBN-10: 0807825948
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Editorial Reviews

Review

A lively and perceptive account. -- The Weekly Standard

A satisfying read. -- Journal of American History

Excellent, marked by superb research and sparkling prose. -- Choice

In this compelling study of the 1948 'Dixiecrat Revolt,' Kari Frederickson recovers a critical chapter in American political history. -- Patricia Sullivan, author of Days of Hope: Race and Democracy in the New Deal Era

Review

Frederickson's book makes several important contributions to our understanding of post-World War II politics in the South. . . . As a result, we have a clearer idea of why southerners voted--or did not vote--for Thurmond and Wright.--American Historical Review

|A satisfying read.--Journal of American History

|A lively and perceptive account.--The Weekly Standard

|A fine example of the 'new' southern political history. . . . Frederickson offers a well-researched, eloquent, and absorbing account of political failure and change, one that contributes greatly to our understanding of the often ironic nature of southern political life in the mid-twentieth century.--Journal of Southern History

|In this compelling study of the 1948 'Dixiecrat Revolt,' Kari Frederickson recovers a critical chapter in American political history. Her book offers fresh insight into how the politics of states' rights and white supremacy transformed southern and national politics in the middle decades of the twentieth century.--Patricia Sullivan, author of Days of Hope: Race and Democracy in the New Deal Era

|Excellent, marked by superb research and sparkling prose.--Choice

|Frederickson excels at showing how both race and economic issues influenced the Dixiecrat movement.--Gulf South Historical Review

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Product Details

  • Library Binding: 328 pages
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; 1 edition (March 26, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807825948
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807825945
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 6.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,931,563 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Timothy B. Tyson on September 18, 2001
Format: Paperback
Frederickson furnishes the historical background necessary to understand the political history of the South--and the nation--for the past half century. The Dixiecrats, who bolted the Democratic Party in 1948 out of their opposition to the notion of racial equality, only won four states in their effort to elect Strom Thurmond. But their reactionary stance would eventually reach a wider public frightened by the integration of public schools, fair housing laws, and federal protection of citizenship rights. The campaign marks the beginning of the white South's flight from the New Deal coalition. Like Strom Thurmond himself, a lightning rod figure in this excellent book, the heirs of these segregationist rebels become Republicans in 1964 and 1968, and bring about the two-party South. The future of the region was foretold in the white supremacist revolt of 1948, and is retold here with clarity, grace, balance, and style. A fine piece of historical research and writing that illuminate American politics today.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 11, 2002
Format: Paperback
Kari Frederickson's analysis of the Dixiecrat movement and their influence on Southern (and American) politics is an important volume, and will likely be the definitive work on the subject. The author charts the course of southern dissatisfaction with the national Democratic Party beginning in the 1930s, culminating in the "critical election" of 1948 when the Dixiecrats challenged President Truman.
What differs in this volume is the detail given to the Dixiecrat Party and J. Strom Thurmond and Fielding Wright, the party's candidates for president and vice-president, respecitively. As a result, we not only gain a better understanding of the Dixiecrats and why the party won the votes of only four southern states, but also how this pivotal event was the beginning of the end for the one-party South. Recommended for those interested in American political history and a must read for historians and students of the American South.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Walt on January 21, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When considering the impact of the States' Rights wing of the Democratic Party on the economic and political structures of the American South, one cannot help but to surmise that even a civil war fought on similar geographical points could not settle the South's perpetual "fear" of loss to the federal government or even a minor acquiescence of some power to their black populace. In her book on the rise and fall of the States Rights Party, Kari Frederickson argues that maintaining "white supremacy [from] the threat of federal civil rights legislation," which in the minds of the southern power brokers had the potential "to destroy [their] system," their way of life as they knew it, was paramount. Framing the argument away from white supremacy to states' rights earned these people the moniker: Dixiecrates (p. 5). The seven chapters that follow trace the ways in which Dixiecrat politicians circle the wagons on such hotly debated issues as New Deal legislation, "tideland" oil rights, and desegregating schools. The author argues that although this movement failed electorally, the people behind it, mainly Strom Thurmond, did not. He and "the Dixiecrates precipitated the weakening of the Democratic Party's grip on presidential elections in the Deep South" (p. 238), thereby allowing the Republican Party to garner some traction on the previously staunch, one-party foothold of the Democrats. Although there are some elements of her thesis that stretch the impact of the Dixiecrat revolt, still, her main point is well documented.

Frederickson marshals substantial evidence to support her claim of Thurmond's "potency" to the revolt.
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