Customer Reviews


129 Reviews
5 star:
 (50)
4 star:
 (36)
3 star:
 (16)
2 star:
 (12)
1 star:
 (15)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


70 of 71 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Corbucci's best film!
Don't listen to any claims made made for Bullet For A General, Django is without a doubt the best non-Leone spaghetti Western of all time. The opening scene (blue-clad Nero carrying a saddle over his shoulder and dragging a coffin through the gooiest mud in film history)is beautiful. Corbucci's direction is more controlled here than anywhere else--less zooms, less...
Published on September 18, 2001 by W. Black

versus
18 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars One of the better Leone rip-offs..but still not great
I grew up with and loved Sergio Leone's "Man with No Name" trilogy with Clint Eastwood. I tend to love Italian pictures (horror and otherwise) and recently having watched Leone's trilogy again, I decided to quench my Spaghetti Western thirst by purchasing a number of now rather unseen "classics" that Leone's films inspired.

Of all the Spaghetti Westerns I...
Published on January 27, 2006 by Lunar Strain


‹ Previous | 1 213 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

70 of 71 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Corbucci's best film!, September 18, 2001
By 
W. Black (East Prairie, MO United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Django (DVD)
Don't listen to any claims made made for Bullet For A General, Django is without a doubt the best non-Leone spaghetti Western of all time. The opening scene (blue-clad Nero carrying a saddle over his shoulder and dragging a coffin through the gooiest mud in film history)is beautiful. Corbucci's direction is more controlled here than anywhere else--less zooms, less jarring close-ups, and neater editing. And Django has to be one of the first action heroes to fire a heavy machine gun from the hip (without even pulling the trigger, no less!).
But make no mistake. This is Italian exploitation--love it or hate it. An ear is cut off, prostitutes fight in the mud, and our hero's hands are crushed in gory detail that would make One-Eyed Jacks mumble in disgust. Don't expect John Ford here. But if you're looking for something different, are curious about spaghetti Westerns but afraid to buy any because so many are horrible--then this is the movie for you!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


31 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's Not Delivery...........It's Django, November 28, 2004
I think most people who don't care much for this movie had been spoiled by Leone before watching it. I mean, Leone really set the bar high for westerns and I don't think anyone has done it as good since. He pretty much reinvented the western and set the rules. Italian directors who followed in his wake were directors who usually did other kinds of films, but started doing westerns coz they were big bucks at the box office. Django was the first of the non-Leone spaghetti westerns, and it's a great movie. Sure, the budget shows and the acting isn't always the best, but I'm able to look past that. The look of the film is unique-Instead of the blazing hot deserts, most of this film is cloudy and muddy(I know it was shot in winter and I think it takes place in winter as well), giving it it's own look. Franco Nero is no Eastwood or Bronson, but he has the right stuff for the part and pulls it off nicely. Very violent for 1966, but we've become so desensitized over the years that it won't have you gasping in shock. It's still brutal enough though. Lots of complaints about the soundtrack again. Well, once again this isn't Leone, therefore the epic music isn't here either. But I don't see how you can hear the theme song and not laugh. You can just see Tom Jones singing this to a crowd of screaming women in Vegas. Once again Blue Underground has given another forgotten film the best possible treatment it can have. They give us an interview with Franco Nero and a very interesting short film with Nero as well. And as always, Blue Underground gives us the original poster as the cover(I love how they do that with these old flicks!). If you have any interest at all in westerns and have seen the Dollars trilogy too many times, you can't go wrong with Django-that is if you lower your expectations a tad.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Mud, Blood and Brilliance, November 2, 2004
This is a classic spaghetti western and an unforgettable film. Filmed on a low budget in the Spanish winter of 65/66, it shows an inventiveness and exuberance that takes the whole genre forward by the scruff of the neck. Hauntingly atmospheric, brilliantly designed and full of almost non-stop action, it repays endless viewings. A particular bonus with this release is the option of a subtitled Italian-language track, which means (a) that you don't have to listen to the awful English version and (b)you get a taste of the original script, which sometimes differs markedly from the dubbed version. The extras include enlightening interviews with Franco Nero and Ruggero Deodato, and a bonus 10-minute monochrome short (stylised and wordless) featuring Nero as an ageing gunslinger, which is worth a look. The main disappointment is the poor quality of some scenes due to the DVD being sourced from a damaged negative. According to the sleeve, this had been found in an Italian vault, "untouched for three decades" - but the British Film Institute was able to source a pristine version for the UK cinema and video release in 1991. Apart from that, full marks for presentation. If you want a lesson in how to make an action masterpiece on a shoestring budget then this is the film for you.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Definitive Django, August 4, 2010
This review is from: Django [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
Previously released in multiple DVD editions by both Anchor Bay and Blue Underground, the latter company now brings Sergio Corbucci's seminal Spaghetti Western DJANGO (1966) to high definition Blu-Ray disc.

A man on foot wearing a tattered Union uniform and dragging a coffin behind him (Franco Nero, ENTER THE NINJA) comes upon a bunch of rowdies whipping a woman. Watching from a distance, the man, Django, does not interfere. But when the rowdies are gunned down by a second group of men with red hoods, and they prepare to burn the girl to death on a makeshift cross, he unleashes the fury of his Colts and soon finds himself caught up in a conflict between an army of white supremacists and a group of Mexican banditos. But what are the mysterious gunslinger's true motives, and what's in that damned coffin?

Violent and brutal, DJANGO is a gothic drama of the American west (even though it was mostly shot in Spain), rich with colorful characters, memorable set-pieces and director Corbucci's (THE GREAT SILENCE, THE HELLBENDERS) unique visual style. Anchoring the film is Nero's star-making turn as the titular protagonist; handsome, tough and utterly convincing dealing death to all comers, even when the film pushes the limits of credibility.

Not as well known in America as the Sergio Leone-directed EuroWesterns starring Clint Eastwood, DJANGO, was, arguably, even more popular and influential with continental audiences. So much so, in fact, that countless unauthorized/unofficial "sequels" were released throughout the the rest of the Sixties, and most of Nero's later movies -whether Westerns or not - ended up being marketed across Europe as DJANGO films.

Blue Underground's hi-def reissue is gorgeous, with a 1.66:1 widescreen transfer from the original negative at 1080p definition. There are rare occurrences of minor age-related wear and damage throughout, but otherwise the image is amazing. Audio options include the original Italian soundtrack in DTS-HD Mono or the English language dub in DTS-HD. Optional English subtitles are included.

For extras, Blue Underground has ported over all the features from its two-disc special edition DVD release, with a great new addition. There's a Franco Nero introduction, a short retrospective featurette called DJANGO: THE ONE AND ONLY that includes interviews with Nero and Assistant Director Ruggero Deodato, a short film starring Nero called THE LAST PISTOLERO, and the international and Italian trailers for the film.

New to this Blu-Ray edition is the vintage 1968 documentary, WESTERN, ITALIAN STYLE, which explored the Spaghetti Western phenomenon while it was still going on, and includes interviews with Corbucci along with other genre masters, like Enzo G. Castellari (ANY GUN CAN PLAY, THE INGLORIOUS BASTARDS) and Sergio Sollima (THE BIG GUNDOWN).

DJANGO is one of the great Spaghetti Westerns, and Blue Underground's new Blu-Ray edition is the definitive home video version. Highly recommended!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars One of the better Leone rip-offs..but still not great, January 27, 2006
I grew up with and loved Sergio Leone's "Man with No Name" trilogy with Clint Eastwood. I tend to love Italian pictures (horror and otherwise) and recently having watched Leone's trilogy again, I decided to quench my Spaghetti Western thirst by purchasing a number of now rather unseen "classics" that Leone's films inspired.

Of all the Spaghetti Westerns I purchased the film Django was one of the best. Does that make it a great film? Oh hell no. Django, released in 1966 was one of the first films to be "inspired" (ah-hem...Rip-off) Leone's Fistful of Dollars. The film molds itself along the same lines as that film. A loner anti-heroic cowboy (played by Italian B-great Franco Nero) travels to a remote, dying western town and ends up fighting two rival bands, a Mexican rag-tag army and an American rag-tag army. As you can tell from the story...it was majorly influenced by the much much better Leone picture. Not only the story, but the appearance of Franco Nero himself is a direct take-off of Clint Eastwood's character. The actor that dubs the voice for the English release even does his best to do a Clint Eastwood impression...an impression that only really induces laughter.

The film tries to be another Fistful of Dollars but it doesn't come close to Leone's grand low-budget feature. The reason why is that this film suffers from some poor acting and some majorly poor dialogue. The bad dialogue could just be the fact of bad translating but some of the lines Nero spouts off are just hilarious! The plot also has some weird aspects such as how Django drags a coffin around. I won't tell what he keeps in the coffin (as it is a nice plot device) but I just found it thigh-slapping funny how this guy drags a coffin around wherever he goes! That would get really old after walking hundreds of miles! What's so great as they take this ridiculous plot device seriously! The directing on the other hand is typical Italian greatness. Sergio Corbucci has a real eye for making the camera shots interesting. He would prove to be the master of the genre (right after Leone) with his great films The Great Silence and Companeros...both of which are FAR better than Django when it comes to quality.

Though Django has many problems it doesn't mean it isn't entertaining. I had a great time with this cheesy spaghetti western that took itself a little too seriously. If you go into this expecting another "Good, the Bad, and the Ugly" then your going to be sourly disappointed. But if you go into this expecting a nice little cheeseball spaghetti western that delivers on the entertainment value, then you will find it much to your liking.

As for the DVD Blue-Underground does another fantastic job at reasserting a long forgotten film. However, it should be warned, that Blue-Underground used the original uncut negative of the film and some of the scenes were damaged because of age. This could put off some people of but for viewers like me, we are just glad to the UNCUT version available in all its bloody glory. This includes an awesomely gruesome "ear cutting" scene. Being a huge fan of Italian horror cinema with the likes of Dario Argento and Lucio Fulci, I get a kick out of these controversial violent gore scenes. Thanks blue-Underground!

The limited edition that I got comes with a bonus disc that features a Franco Nero western film short on one of those little mini-DVDs. The bonus film is under 10 minutes, features no talking making it basically a way for the director to show off style. It's good for a one-time watcher as most probably won't stick it into their DVD player after viewing it the first time.

On a side note I love how Django was so popular that it inspired 50 unofficial sequels? Over 50?! That's unheard of. I know Italy is known for making lots of unrelated "unofficial" sequels (as in the case of Dawn of the Dead) but over 50 is just incredible! Of all the "sequels" there is only one official one made in 1987 called Django Strikes Again starring Franco Nero (haven't seen it yet but soon will). Blue-Underground released one of the "unofficial" sequels strangely titled Django Kill...if you live, Shoot! which I just ordered. One of my new goals in life to view every single one of the 50+ unofficial sequels to Django. Hell, I might even name my kid Django. Oh my God Django...what have you done to me?! Now you've got me talking kids.....YIKES!!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Django Chained, April 6, 2013
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Django [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
Blue Underground, god bless 'em, disappoint again with their blu-ray line, this time it's the 1966 Sergio Corbucci/Franco Nero spaghetti western classic Django. I don't know what they're seeing on their monitors at BU HQ, but this hi-def presentation is literally ruined by a thick, grimy layer of digital distortion and noise all the way thru. Go back, read that sentence again. I've tried to watch this thing five or six times and just give up around the 15 or 20 min mark everytime. And yes, I've checked later chapters, and the image never improves. After viewing the last Django BU DVD release - which I recommend btw (see, I'm NOT a Blue Underground hater), I'd say that the problem may well lie (is that correct grammar?) with the film elements themselves. Some movies just weren't meant to be seen in the over-cranked blu format...or maybe it's the mastering equipment...I dunno. All I can say is that I wanted to fall in love with this disc and...I just can't. No quibs with the actual film itself. Stone classic. And maybe I'm expecting too much - nah! This disc falls flat on every level. If you've seen the Tarantino tribute film thingy, you know how good the theme song can sound. The sound on this disc is "true to original" but it's still mono, flat and slightly distorted. I know, I know - that's the way it was supposed to sound. But I don't think the video image was ever supposed to look like this. Listen. Buy the Blue Underground DVD. As of 2013, it's probably the best way to see this flick in the home video format. And you know what? I'm ok with that.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars DJANGO FINALLY ON BLU-RAY!!!!!, January 7, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Django [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
Blue Underground's blu-ray of this 1966 cult spaghetti western is simply gorgeous!!! Django is beautifully restored in 1080p and quite frankly, this is print is the best it will ever look!!! Some people complain about film grain, scratches, dirt, what do you expect for a 45 year old movie for christ sake!!! Many kudo's to Blue Underground for restoring this cult classic on blu-ray!!! Looking foward to Death Rides A Horse and The Great Silence on BLU-RAY!!! Are you listening BLUE UNDERGROUND???
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars EASILY ONE OF THE BEST WESTERNS!, November 23, 2000
This review is from: Django [VHS] (VHS Tape)
I am not too fond of westerns. I only enjoyed the westerns of Terence Hill and Bud Spencer until I saw Sergio Corbucci's "DJANGO". He is a mysterious stranger who enters the town dragging a coffin and riding no horse. He's the guy everyone loves to hate, seeing that he's quick with his gun. This movie is very gory & violent, so watch it if you can stomach it. It's no wonder why it was banned in many countires! Strongly recomended, I rank "DJANGO" one of the best westerns along with "MY NAME IS NOBODY", "ACE HIGH" and "THEY CALL ME TRINITY".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It's "El Mercenario" with a little more naive charm!, June 26, 2001
By 
anomj7t7 "anomj7t7" (Quinton, Va United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Django [VHS] (VHS Tape)
Even though I gave this movie four stars (for originality and for its contribution to the genre),with a bigger budget(a Leone/Morricone kind of treatment),better dialogue (the dub-job was,quite frankly,abyssmal)and some fine tuning on the plot,this movie could have been the greatest western of all time.The opening scene where this mysterious stranger (Django)is dragging this coffin through the mud and its contrast against the sentimental crooning of the opening music is,possibly,one of the weirdest visuals I've ever seen in a movie,let alone a western.There are a couple of stomach turningly violent scenes that I did not care for and the body count is probably comparable to "the matrix"....I dont know what all to say...This is one weird,gloomy,gothic,machine gun,spaghetti western.The addition of the trailer and the Franco Nero interview were nice bonuses.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars (BLU RAY REVIEW) 3 1/2 stars for one of the better spaghetti westerns, October 15, 2013
By 
This review is from: Django [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
Inspired by Sergio Leone's "Man With No Name" trilogy, another Italian Sergio (Corbucci) keeps the genre popular worldwide with this violent but fun film. Starring a young (23) blue-eyed stud with a shortened name of Franco Nero, the movie is pretty simple and follows the Leone formula.

Django (Nero) walks throughout the film dragging a coffin behind him using an attached rope. We don't know what happened to his normal transportation. Filmed in Italy and Spain, the setting is the U. S. /Mexican border just after the Civil War. Django is a former Union soldier (still wears the yellow striped pants) headed for a small town on the Mexican side. Along the way he finds a woman who is being beaten by a handful of Mexicans. After dispatching them quickly with his six-shooter, another group of horsemen arrive. These are Americans but wear red scarves or hoods, suggesting an element of the Klan. They suffer a fate similar to the Mexicans.

Django takes Maria (Loredana Nusciak) with him into town. Django's goal is to avenge his wife who died at the hand of one of the equally evil group of bad guys. Either the Mexican revolutionaries led by Gen. Rodriguez (Jose Bodalo) or more likely, the red KKK dudes and their leader Maj. Jackson (Eduardo Fajardo). Jackson is so evil that he dispatches young Mexicans one at a time to run up a hill, before shooting them with his rifle as target practice. While Django is adept with his handgun, he only has one and it only has six bullets. So to everyone's surprise he invites Jackson to bring his 40 member gang into town for a final shootout. Naturally Django has a surprise waiting.

Corbucci who wrote the story as well as directed the film, is brutal with his confrontations. Kids are killed, ears are severed and hands are crushed along with the unusually severe beatings. Keeping with the times of 1966, it's not overly gory, but would surely earn an "R" rating, even today. The film has plenty of logic-distancing scenes as well as some continuity issues. And there are some noticeable blunders that might leaving one shaking their head. Still, considering the budget and the scope, "Django" is a film worth seeing if you are a Western film aficionado. "Django" continued on with several sequels and was fondly remembered by filmmaker Quinton Tarantino as evidenced by his 2012 film "Django Unchained" which featured a brief cameo by Nero.

The Blu ray adaptation has some problems but is overall well done. The film begins with an optional introduction by Nero and the following disclaimer: The print used was "transferred from its original camera negative, which contained some intermittent age-related damage." And yes, it's pretty evident. There are a couple incidents of a pause between scenes. In other cases, the picture fluctuates from scene to scene. There is some unusually heavy grain in evidence in some frames. Having said all that, at least they told us. And in reality, most of the film looks very good. Excellent color, good detail and contrast.

I wasn't exactly thrilled with the audio either. We get two DTS-HD Master Audio Mono (1.0) tracks. One is in the original Italian with English subtitles. The other is an English dubbed version. I watched the dubbed version for a few minutes but didn't like Nero's voice actor. It also seemed like the translation didn't always make sense. This was verified when I went over to the Italian and the subtitles were in fact different. Neither audio version is all that strong in either case. The film begs for a more immersive track. Subtitles include English, English SDH, French and Spanish.

Extras include an interview with Nero and asst. director Ruggero Deodato, a 10 minute film starring Nero called 'The Last Pistolero.' There is also a 1968 documentary featuring several filmmakers about the "Spaghetti Western Phenomenon."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 213 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Django
Django by Sergio Corbucci (DVD - 2007)
$14.98 $8.96
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.