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Do Me Twice: My Life After Islam Paperback – August 21, 2007


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Strebor Books; 1st Strebor Books Trade Pbk. Ed edition (August 21, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1593091222
  • ISBN-13: 978-1593091224
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.7 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,179,544 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

This book should be read in addition to Manning Marable's "A Life of Reinvention: Malcolm X" and Alex Haley's "Autobiography of Malcolm X."  --Sonsyrea Tate Montgomery

"Sonsyrea Tate has shared mile marker thoughts along the way to wholeness. In her new provocative book, Tate challenges religion and relationships. She clears the way to revolutionary, radical forgiveness, but most of all, she forces us to rethink ideas we have taken for granted. Her journey may not be yours, her conclusions may not be your own, but her words and thoughts are well worth your deepest contemplation. It is clear that she is not a woman to be ignored!" -- Bishop T.D. Jakes Sr.

"This book is Sonsyrea Tate's triumphant shout testifying to a life filled with grace and courage. It is a testimony for anyone who has to fashion her own life from the legacy of burdens and encouragement handed down by parents, by culture, by religion and by society. In other words, this is a story about becoming fully human and living life out loud -- on your own terms." -- Patrice Gaines, author of Laughing in the Dark

From the Author

This book adds the children and women's perspective to the narrative of Islam in the African American community.

More About the Author

Sonsyrea Tate Montgomery is the author of Little X: Growing Up in the Nation of Islam, selected by the American Library Association as a "Best Books", and author of Do Me Twice: My Life After Islam. She is a veteran journalist, who has published articles in The Washington Post, The Washington Times, The Virginian Pilot, The Washington Informer, and other publications. She loves, loves, loves literature - reading and writing it - for its transformative powers. She is working on her first novel, and third non-fiction book.

Customer Reviews

I truly enjoyed reading Sonsyrea's memoir.
Victoria Wells
Shifts were too extreme and sometimes it didn't flow as nicely, as I would have like to have read.
Orchid Goddess
I will, however, be on the lookout for her first book.
Ms. 90

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Kindle Customer on August 15, 2007
Format: Paperback
Sonsyrea Tate was raised in a ten children, devout Muslim family. Sonsyrea's mother thought that it was a woman's duty to take care of her family and that having ten children was a blessing from Allah. As Sonsyrea aged, she began to question the wisdom of having children that you can barely afford to take care of. In their household, it was the oldest daughter's duty to help with the other children and as Sonsyrea grew older this caused problems between she and her mother. As the family struggled to survive, she thought that it was unwise for her mother to not step up to the plate and get a job to help with the expenses of living; this caused their personalities to clash. Sonsyrea was determined to go to college and have a career and not have a house full of children, as did her mother. Not only was Sonsyrea dealing with the problems between her mother and herself, but Sonsyrea's favorite uncle was dying and to make matters worse her father was arrested for dealing drugs, causing the family even more financial problems. Just as most religions teach that fornication is wrong so does Islam. Dealing with her sexuality became a major problem . In order to have guilt-free sex, Sonsyrea married at a young age. She un-wisely married a man in constant trouble with the law.

I admire Sonsyrea because she did not let past mistakes ruin her life and went on to get the career that she wanted. The problem that I had with this offering was that it seemed to be written out of sequence. And she could have put in a little more excitement; this did not stop me from receiving the point of view that she was making. This book was an uncorrected proof so if she gets the chapters in better order it will be an enjoyable read.

Reviewed by Margaret Ball

APOOO BookClub
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By The RAWSISTAZ Reviewers on November 22, 2007
Format: Paperback
DO ME TWICE: My Life After Islam is not a generic book about the highs and lows of being a member of the Nation of Islam. From her days in Muslim School to her guilt-trip marriage and her exit from Islam, Sonsyrea Tate reveals a poignant personal history unlike any "coming of age" or "coming to religion" story ever told.

Tate unveils the dark secrets that controlled her childhood, yet strangely liberate her as an adult. As she becomes comfortable with her own sensuality, she realizes just how much her sexual identity has defined many of the dramatic periods of her life and the life decisions she's made. Against the backdrop of colorful, dysfunctional family and the author's lyrical style peppered with raw realism, DO ME TWICE is a hands down keeper.

Reviewed by Cxandra
for The RAWSISTAZ Reviewers
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ms. 90 on June 7, 2010
Format: Paperback
While this was a reader-friendly story, it was very uneven and jumped around too much. I couldn't get a clear sense of the timeline. There didn't appear to be any real discussion about her issues with Islam until Chapter 10. Not something I'd read again, nor worth a purchase. I will, however, be on the lookout for her first book. Maybe after reading it, this one will become clearer. 2.5 stars
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Format: Paperback
In the modern world, society is often casting men in dominant roles over women. Growing up a woman in the Muslim religion, Sonsyrea Tate learned quickly that she was expected to conform to the same subservient role. Why do we create "command and obey" roles in a sexist fashion? Shouldn't a man and a woman treat each other as equals in a relationship? Tate worked a job on top of a full college course load, and took care of all the domestic chores such as shopping, cooking, and cleaning while her man did nothing. Yet she was still expected to be subservient to his wishes. There is not much sense in an equation such as that and as she became aware of that, Tate would question her religion and her rights as a woman.
Sonsyrea Tate is a woman who grew up practicing the Muslim religion, but who had Catholic grandparents. She sees both religions as outdated sets of rules that give men power over women, heavily favor procreation, and force marriage at a young age in order to prevent pregnancy out of wedlock. As she begins dating the boy next door, Ron, she is forced to sneak around and conceal her newly blossoming sex life under a cloak of lies and guilt. After she becomes pregnant at the age of 16, she immediately opts for an abortion without telling anyone but her best friend. She eventually gets married to Ron simply to relieve her conscience of the guilt that religion was piling on top of her.
As their marriage progresses, their situation simply becomes worse. She takes care of all the responsibilities that a husband and wife should take care of equally, while Ron remains unemployed and often does not return home for whole nights and sometimes even multiple days. Yet, upon his return she is expected to fulfill his every want and need.
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